Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 31
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    278

    Fenix BC30 Bike Light, Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review



    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,
    Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6

    (photo heavy)

    The BC30 is Fenix latest high power bike light and feature twin XM-L2-T6 leds delivering their Dual Distance Beam technology. This is their first replaceable internal battery bike light making the BC30 a powerful and user friendly cycle light for on or off road.
    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netimg_0016.jpg
    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netimg_0001.jpg


    What's in the box
    The BC30 come in good quality cardboard box with data and photos on front and back. Inside is a foam cut out protecting the various items, to include BC30 light, handle bar clamp, remote burst switch, user manual and registration/warranty card and a small plastic bag with 3 "O" ring replacement and a couple of rubber inserts to adjust the clamping diameter according to the size of your handle bar.

    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netimg_0006.jpgFenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netimg_0007.jpg

    Initial overview and feel
    At first view the light inspire confidence due to its overall quality, usual with Fenix lights.
    Housing two 18650 batteries the BC30 is a fairly big cycle light but well balanced in its designed as well as its looks. The light is made of aluminum alloy with a good quality plastic battery cradle and aluminum end cap. The BC30 also has some very impressive features, 1200lms on Turbo, 1800lms on remote burst mode, long run time, low power indicator, adjustable handle bar clamp and their Dual Distance Beam. The BC30 certainly looks at home on my bike handle bar and could also be used around the house or while camping as a hand held flashlight.
    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netimg_0009.jpg

    The head is satin silver, nice contrast with the satin mat black body, four cooling groves are positioned on each side of the light with an additional six on the upper body.
    You can immediately see that the BC30 has been designed for the cyclist has the head has a small visor on the top to reduce the height of the beam and therefore may minimizing slightly the risk of blinding incoming traffic (this of course is subject to the light being properly adjusted on your bike!).
    The twin lens is designed to achieve their Dual Distance Beam and is very specific to their system. The internal battery cradle is removable from the rear of the light making the head and body a single mass for better heat dissipation. This works very well with the whole body warming up if no airflow is present.
    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netimg_0002.jpgFenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netimg_0006a.jpgFenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netimg_0018.jpg

    The cradle has a square cut out on the underneath to facilitate battery removable by pushing the battery out through that opening (well thought out Fenix) They advise you to use flat top and they are right, standard batteries with the raised terminal make the battery removal a little more difficult.
    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netimg_0031.jpgFenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-fenixbatt1.jpg

    The cradle locking system is easy to operate and the release ring is spring loaded staying in flush with the end cap when not in use. The Battery cradle is made of an aluminum end cap attached to a plastic cradle which looks high quality.

    The light handlebar clamping is made of strong plastic rail attached to the underneath of the BC30, which do slide into the handlebar clamp and lock in place via a release catch at the rear.
    Again, Fenix are showing good friendly cycling design as the clamp as an horizontal 30 degree side adjustment to compensate for the curvature of many handle bars. I had to change the rubber insert to the two slimmer one, and they are easily replaced and locate securely into the mounting and do give a very firm grip without marking the handlebar.
    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netimg_0010.jpgFenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netimg_0013.jpg

    A small "Jack plug" port with a rubber bung is situated under the light to attach the remote "Burst" switch.
    The Remote Burst switch has a Velcro strap with an anti-slip backing and the switch itself has a "glow in the dark" rubber cover. The connecting jack plug has an "O" ring giving a waterproof and firm connection. This need to be pushed in firmly to establish a tight connection, if not the plug will come off! Once again, I am very impressed by the attention to details which went into the design of the BC30.
    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netimg_0003.jpgFenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netimg_0025.jpgFenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netimg_0039a.jpg

    Manufacturer Data

    Utilizes two Cree XM-L2 T6 LED with a lifespan of 50,000 hours
    • Uses two 18650 rechargeable batteries (Li-ion) or four 3V CR123A batteries (Lithium)
    • Output mode / Runtime:
    Burst: 1800 lumens
    Turbo: 1200 lumens / 1h 50min
    High: 500 lumens / 5h
    Mid: 200 lumens / 11h
    Low: 100 lumens / 20h
    Flashing: 200 lumens
    **Lumen/Run time figures given are from Fenix lab test carried out with their ARB-L2 and they warn you that results may vary due to battery and environment**
    • Dimensions and Weight:
    Length: 4.99" / 126.7mm
    Width: 1.97" / 50mm
    Height: 1.25" / 31.8mm
    Weight: 5.68oz / 161 grams (excluding batteries and handlebar mount)
    • Instant Burst: 1800 Lumens
    • Flashing Mode: 200 Lumens
    • Maximum Distance: 170 meters (557 feet)
    • Max 1800-Lumen Output
    • Instant burst activation with the remote pressure switch
    • Dual distance beam system
    • 4 brightness levels plus warning mode
    • Digitally regulated output - maintains constant brightness
    • Quick attach and detach handlebar mount sized for 22mm - 35mm handlebars
    • Easy, secure adjustment of the light's direction
    • Made of aluminium alloy and quality plastic
    • 0 - 30 degree horizontal adjustment and any vertical adjustment to satisfy your various lighting needs
    • High-quality detachable rubber mat included for improved shock resistance
    • Innovative quick-change battery system for fast and easy battery replacement
    • Low-power battery indicator
    • Normal function in heavy rain or thick fog (IPX-6 Rating)

    Settings

    The light is turn on by a 2 second push of the power switch, which will activate your last used constant mode (well done again, no need to cycle through the modes!) then modes can be changed by a single press of the switch, the flash mode can be activated by a double press of the switch once the light is on, to return to the constant mode , only one press is required. To switch off, again a two second press is required. The "remote burst mode" switch will work when the BC30 is on or off and will require constant pressure for illumination to the 1800lms or the highest level according to the power left in the batteries. The low Battery warning system is incorporated in the switch and will turn from green to red when the battery gets low. No data is given regarding run time and light behaviour when the battery light is on red. As this is important to cyclists, have a look to my test results, this do differ enormously according to the batteries you use.

    Riding with the BC30
    The first thing I notice once turn on; was its neutral tint, not surprising as I am used to cool white cycle and flashlights and this was a little warm for me.
    **Please note the BC30 tint is neutral and not warm**
    I do prefer the raw white light coming out of cool tint leds for forest trails. (Just down to personal preference).
    The colour rendering of the BC30 is very good and did not create some of the harsh shadows encountered sometime with the cool white LED while cycling. The NW generally does not look as bright as the CW but will illuminate better in rainy or foggy conditions and is preferred by some cyclists. I would have liked for Fenix to offer both tints for sale. The beam is very wide with good throw and place a lot of uniform lighting on the ground where you need most see photos. As mentioned before, the fitting and removal of the light is very quick and easy, The battery condition warning light is dim enough not to interfere with your night vision while ridding and is showing through the switch. The body main switch on my review sample sometime required several attempts to change light mode while wearing gloves on a ride.
    This may be due to the switch not being raised much from the body of the BC30.
    The burst mode switch due to its small size and its velcro strap can be position virtually anywhere on your handle bar. Mine was position on the left hand side just before the gear trigger! What I did found, is that despite the fact that I can always used a little more light on technical or fast section, the difference to my eyes from 1200 to 1800 lumens on a forest trail was not that great (see video) and changing light modes for me was an unnecessary distraction! So I did not use it in the forest but what I did find is; once on the road, the burst mode was a good way to attract motorists attention, like flashing your car headlamp. The Burst mode for me is more of a road feature!

    The BC30 wide beam is well suited as an handlebar light and ridding trails with an additional helmet mounted cool white light was a great combination for me.
    For road use, I found the BC30 NW tint excellent and found the high or medium setting more than sufficient for non lit roads giving me long riding time.

    Home test
    The Fenix BC30 was tested with my home made light sphere and a cooling fan was used between the readings. (please note they will be a small margin of error for the readings as the BC30 was removed and reposition on the sphere for the various readings)
    The test/monitoring was started 2mn after initial turn on, this is in line with ANSI method of testing flashlights. The BC30 was turned onto TURBO then left until it switches itself off. As you will see from the graph, the light did step down to different levels to achieved long run times.


    The BC30 was tested with 18650 batteries
    3 years old AW 2600mAh (Start voltage 4.2/4.2v, end voltage 3.04/3.66v)
    2 years old INTEL 3100mAh, (Start voltage 4.19/4.19v, end voltage 3.04/3.12v)
    6 months old PLUZPOWER 3400mAh (Start voltage 4.21/4.21v, end voltage 2.86/3.07v)
    New FENIX 2600 mAh (Start voltage 4.2/4.2v, end voltage 3.0-3.06/3.17-3.27v)

    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-bc30tests.jpgFenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-time.jpg

    Interesting to note the difference in run time with different batteries.
    The time given by Fenix is correct but you must realise that the time given by manufacturers are from turn on to turn off and not the time the light will run at a specific output level. Ie you will not get 1h50mn at 1200 lumens, but this is the same for all manufacturers given running time


    Manufacters data - Low100 lumens / reading from my integration sphere - 73000 lux
    Medium 200 lumens / 144000 lux
    High 500 lumens / 346000 lux
    Turbo 1200 lumens / 830000 lux

    The Fenix 2600 mAh batteries achieve the longest run time on turbo mode (approx 86mn) out of my four batteries tests but the PluzPower 3400mAh did achieved the longest overall runtime with 4h.15 from turn on to turn off (approx 80mn on the turbo level), not surprising due to the extra amperage.
    I would be very interested to see what runtime you do get out of the new Fenix 3400mAh batteries?

    Outdoor beam shots
    Trying to replicate what the eye does see at night via a photo is not easy, so to help a little with your perception of the light performance I have given the film speed, F stop and exposure. I do try to mimic as much what I can see via the camera settings, so you will notice sometime different exposure etc.

    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-1bc30low.jpgFenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-1bc30medium.jpg
    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-1bc30high.jpg
    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-1bc30turbo.jpgFenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-bc30med.jpg
    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-bc30high.jpg
    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-bc30turbo.jpgFenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-bc30turboplus.jpgFenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-img_4246-copy.jpg



    ARB-L2 18650 Fenix 2600mAh batteries
    Flat top batteries
    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-fenixbatt2.jpg
    Please note the batteries are not included in the box giving you the choice of purchasing your preferred make and amperage or used the one you already have.


    For/Against
    Please note, that like in all reviews some of the For/Against may be down to the reviewer personal preferences.
    For: Fantastic uniform beam, great output even if you disregard the burst mode, good runtimes, long steady turbo mode, lights level are well chosen, easy interface, good clamp and well designed battery cradle, cyclist purpose built light with an attractive look; safe light (30+ mn once red low battery warning is activated) and levels stepping down to conserve power, last used memory mode, very long overall runtimes with 3400 mAh batteries, very comprehensive instruction booklet, remote burst switch, well priced for the quality, features and output.

    Against: Very minor points: only offered in Neutral White tint (for some this will not be a negative point), only have one flash mode.


    So to sum up the review, if like me you like the internal battery(ies) cycle lights; the BC30 is an excellent choice, the light has very good features, good output and run time for that type of set up and when you look at the like for like competition, for me the UK retail price is attractive.

    For me this is a real keeper!

    The Fenix BC30 and the 18650 2600 mAh batteries were kindly supplied by Fenix for my review via their distributor: myfenix.co.uk.
    myfenix.co.uk also offered a free engraving service for the light.


    Skyraider59 (UK)







    Last edited by Skyraider59; 09-05-2014 at 05:33 AM.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    849
    Nice review. Since you made your own integrating sphere, is it possible to give us measured lumen values instead of lux values. I don't have any idea of what lux values equate to in terms of real world light output.

    In your first graph, there are steps in the output. Is the light cycling to a lower power output as the batteries become depleted?

    The fact that you have to hold down the burst button in order to keep it activated is utterly ridiculous. Most riders will probably use that mode during high speed descents, when you need to have a good grip. Taking another finger (besides the one or two engaging the brake) off the grip in order to hold down the switch is just too dangerous. It just goes to show you that these lights aren't actually designed by people who ride bikes at night. Do other light do this?

    Also rereading parts of your review, can you change modes with the remote button? It doesn't seem like you can, based on what you have written here. That would be major fail in my opinion.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    278
    Quote Originally Posted by varider View Post
    Nice review. Since you made your own integrating sphere, is it possible to give us measured lumen values instead of lux values. I don't have any idea of what lux values equate to in terms of real world light output.
    Hi
    On my way to work in a few minutes and I will reply to all points you have raised later on.
    For the moment, regarding reading in Lumens, Lux meters are very cheap and equipment to get Lumens readings extremely expensive (Thousand of £) But the Lux meter still give you a good view of the light performance as well as behavior has you can record the discharge graph. I do not believe that they is a scientific direct formula to transform Lux into Lumens as the measurement are made differently, but I think there is a DIY formula published by another light reviewer, I will see if I can use it. If not I can publish some of the figures I obtained from different lights to give you a measurement guide. Need to go now and will speak to you later on. Thanks

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    782
    Great review, Skyraider59: many thanks!

    The only questionable statement, IMHO, is about blinding of oncoming traffic: according to pictures, it's hard to believe 3mm "visor" may affect the beam in any way.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    782
    Quote Originally Posted by varider View Post
    The fact that you have to hold down the burst button in order to keep it activated is utterly ridiculous. Most riders will probably use that mode during high speed descents,
    Probably, its purpose is just to give a visible signal to the other drivers in complicated road conditions?

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    278
    Quote Originally Posted by varider View Post
    In your first graph, there are steps in the output. Is the light cycling to a lower power output as the batteries become depleted?
    Yes it does cycle From Turbo to high ,medium then low levels, this is done at different time and for different length of time depending on the batteries you use, but the step down has not been set too early as you do get a full turbo mode for between 60 to 85mn according to the batteries used. A lot of the lights on the market will start with an high output but the discharge curve will drop quickly. I think the running time on Turbo for an integral two 18650 battery set up is very good.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    278
    Quote Originally Posted by varider View Post
    Also rereading parts of your review, can you change modes with the remote button? It doesn't seem like you can, based on what you have written here. That would be major fail in my opinion.
    The remote switch is just a Burst switch and will not change the light mode as mentioned this was not used "off road", too much to think and watch without having to play around with a light switch on a downhill trail, so not good for MTB but I can see a use for Roadies, as a "flash mode"!
    I think this is also a way to advertise true higher output ie 1800 lumens when the light has only an operational output of 1200 lumens (which is ALREADY great) I have noticed that a lot of manufacturers are doing the same with flashlights advertising turbo etc modes which only last 3mn and then the light step down the their normal operating mode. All clever marketing but let face it, this it is is much better that the cheap ebay lights advertised by unscrupulous dealers with output up to 5000 lumens for twin XM-L or 2000 lumens for single XM-L NO WAY!!

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    278
    Hi Archie, that little visor if the light is adjusted properly will shave a little from the top of the conical beam emitted by the LED's now in practice how effective this is without very careful adjustment of the light direction remain to be seen, so I may change my wording slightly. Thanks for bringing this to my attention

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    278
    Just done some shot in the back garden to show you how nice the BC30 beam is! The other light is the twin XM-L light, the X2 for which some of the salers advertise as 5000 lumens, real jokers !

    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netbc30x2.jpg
    BC30 on turbo 1200 lumens and X2 on high
    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netbc30x2a.jpg
    BC30 on high 800 lumens and X2 on medium, (the X2 has only got 3 steady modes, high, medium and low)
    Fenix BC30 Bike Light,  Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review-netgardenref1.jpg

    Look at the lit up floor area and you will see that the BC30 is designed as a main bar light

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    10
    Great write up, Ordered one last night to alternate between my bikes. Carry loads of 18650 so these types of lights appeal alot more to me.
    Will order some Fenix cells and report on their runtimes

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    278
    Quote Originally Posted by lparker88 View Post
    Great write up, Ordered one last night to alternate between my bikes. Carry loads of 18650 so these types of lights appeal alot more to me.
    Will order some Fenix cells and report on their runtimes
    Thanks this will be great,, looking at my run time obtained with the 3400mAp batteries, I would be very interested to learn of any one else using that type of batteries and what run time they get. The turbo run time was similar if not less that with the 2600, but the overall run time was fantastic, this would be great for road riding as you generally use lower modes than MTB

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    278
    Quote Originally Posted by lparker88 View Post
    Great write up, Ordered one last night to alternate between my bikes. Carry loads of 18650 so these types of lights appeal alot more to me.
    Will order some Fenix cells and report on their runtimes
    Thanks this will be great,, looking at my run time obtained with the 3400mAp batteries, I would be very interested to learn of any one else using that type of batteries and what run time they get. The turbo run time was similar if not less that with the 2600, but the overall run time was fantastic, this would be great for road riding as you generally use lower modes than MTB

  13. #13
    Just Ride !
    Reputation: C.M.S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    806
    Looks like for the money this light can not be beat !! I will be diffenitly be purchasing this light very soon ..
    Great review btw :-)
    Mountain Biking in and around KC.

  14. #14
    am7
    am7 is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    12
    Hi,
    Immediately after using this light I found it to be the light for me. I will give my humble opinion in simple terms rather than a professional review.

    First the bad points:
    1) After opening the package I was disappointed with the looks, compared to all my other lights this is the ugliest by far, least they could to is keep the head black instead of going silver (sticks out like a sore thumb).
    2) It is extremely heavy compared to my other lights. Easily twice the weight sometimes even more.
    3) The mount has a long nasty bolt, again sticking out like a sore thumb.
    4) It is a real PITA to change batteries. The cover takes extreme force to close and will definitely break at some point (fenix warranty better be good). The cover does not sit entirely flush to one side when closed.
    5) I bought a self contained light to do away with wires, fenix defeats the purpose by offering a wired switch, needless to say I will not bother mounting it but did try it on the light and it worked intermittently no matter how hard and deep the connector was inserted. Feedback definitely not positive.

    Now for the good points:
    1) I love the natural light. I will call it yellow. I will never ride with a white light again. It is incredible how much more comfortable it is.

    I am loving the wide dispersed beam, there is no hotspot. When I am riding the light completely dissapears and I do not pay attention to it. All my other lights are like shining a white powerful torch on the street, really tiring. Cars appreciate the light as well as I am getting no flashes from oncoming traffic whereas before I used to get flashed all the time as all my other lights were blinding them. I use all 4 levels of brightness on the BC30 depending on occasion. If I am riding at walking pace between people I will use the lowest setting, if I am barreling downhill at speed I will use the highest. Mostly I use the middle two. I can't stress how much relaxing this light is to use, my other lights had a very bright hotspot and still no light at the sides so you get blinded but still not safe to see. With the BC30 I have soft all round light but feel alot safer without the need to bump the brightness, I just see alot better with less light I cannot explain it better.

    2) Battery life is outstanding. Twice of what I am used to. It will be very rare to have to change batteries on the road now whereas before it was a certainty. I do not have to run this light as bright as the others so I can easily get 6 hours (3400mAh cells), my rides are nowhere near that long during the night.

    3) The mount mounts very easily and securely on the handle bars and takes the light just as easily on and off. It just works although horizontal angle movement is limited in large steps but it does not bother me as I do not use it.

    4) Price is the same as all my other lights so no complaints here.

    5) I can spend less time looking at lights on the internet and more time riding.

    Maybe I forgot something, but I will add here if I remember.

  15. #15
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,817
    ^^Negative point #4 is what happened to me, and yes, it did break.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: spankone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    375

    Fenix BC30 Bike Light, Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review

    That issue is because of the o-ring on the carrier. Apply a little silicone grease. If it's still stiff try one of the other orings that comes with. Or fit a thinner o-ring.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    278
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Ray View Post
    ^^Negative point #4 is what happened to me, and yes, it did break.
    Hi, sorry to hear about the battery holder, I was going to say add a little silicone grease to the o ring, I had the same problem with mine being a little difficult to close at first, but I put it down to being new and tight, i never did lube mine, but as loosen up as it no longer required excessive pressure to be able to rotate the lock. What we all want to know now, is how this has been dealt with, from your supplier or Fenix?

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    278
    Quote Originally Posted by am7 View Post
    Hi,
    Immediately after using this light I found it to be the light for me. I will give my humble opinion in simple terms rather than a professional review.

    First the bad points:
    1) After opening the package I was disappointed with the looks, compared to all my other lights this is the ugliest by far, least they could to is keep the head black instead of going silver (sticks out like a sore thumb).
    2) It is extremely heavy compared to my other lights. Easily twice the weight sometimes even more.
    3) The mount has a long nasty bolt, again sticking out like a sore thumb.
    4) It is a real PITA to change batteries. The cover takes extreme force to close and will definitely break at some point (fenix warranty better be good). The cover does not sit entirely flush to one side when closed.
    5) I bought a self contained light to do away with wires, fenix defeats the purpose by offering a wired switch, needless to say I will not bother mounting it but did try it on the light and it worked intermittently no matter how hard and deep the connector was inserted. Feedback definitely not positive.

    Now for the good points:
    1) I love the natural light. I will call it yellow. I will never ride with a white light again. It is incredible how much more comfortable it is.

    I am loving the wide dispersed beam, there is no hotspot. When I am riding the light completely dissapears and I do not pay attention to it. All my other lights are like shining a white powerful torch on the street, really tiring. Cars appreciate the light as well as I am getting no flashes from oncoming traffic whereas before I used to get flashed all the time as all my other lights were blinding them. I use all 4 levels of brightness on the BC30 depending on occasion. If I am riding at walking pace between people I will use the lowest setting, if I am barreling downhill at speed I will use the highest. Mostly I use the middle two. I can't stress how much relaxing this light is to use, my other lights had a very bright hotspot and still no light at the sides so you get blinded but still not safe to see. With the BC30 I have soft all round light but feel alot safer without the need to bump the brightness, I just see alot better with less light I cannot explain it better.

    2) Battery life is outstanding. Twice of what I am used to. It will be very rare to have to change batteries on the road now whereas before it was a certainty. I do not have to run this light as bright as the others so I can easily get 6 hours (3400mAh cells), my rides are nowhere near that long during the night.

    3) The mount mounts very easily and securely on the handle bars and takes the light just as easily on and off. It just works although horizontal angle movement is limited in large steps but it does not bother me as I do not use it.

    4) Price is the same as all my other lights so no complaints here.

    5) I can spend less time looking at lights on the internet and more time riding.

    Maybe I forgot something, but I will add here if I remember.
    Regarding your Neg point 1, I think Looks is always a matter of personal preference, I do like it with its silver head and I "personally" think that due to it size it does need it,otherwise this would have been too much of a big black blob, but again some would have preferred it all black! More stealth looking :-)
    I also agree with your point Neg 3, the long bolt, lucky this is under the light so you wont stab yourself on it, but this is unusually long and not pleasing to the eyes!
    Regarding the Neg 5, I also had trouble with it to start with but this was due to the jack plug not being fully in, this require a very firm push,this is a lot easier if you do it with the light in your hand instead of fitted on your bar. May be a little lube again will help, but if it is fully in you should not have any problems. Now regarding the use of the burst mode switch, for me who use mainly the light in the fores, it is totally not required and is unwanted feature!
    Also as you said people who will buy the BC30 will do so to have a wire free light, so putting a wire remote burst switch is a little odd.

    Anyway pleased you really like the light, I do as well and I am getting used to the Neutral tint and I am sure this will be a lot more user friendly on wet and misty nights in the forest.
    I just wish it was continuous 1800 lumens instead of burst 1800 lumens. 1200 is still very good specially with the way their beam works, but the forest contrary to roads do soak in the light, so you can always do with a little more!

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: spankone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    375

    Fenix BC30 Bike Light, Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review

    [QUOTE=Skyraider59;11522205]
    I also agree with your point Neg 3, the long bolt, lucky this is under the light so you wont stab yourself on it, but this is unusually long and not pleasing to the eyes!
    QUOTE]

    Or course this is for those of us that have the larger 35mm bars. We need the extra thread.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Sirius9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    136
    Quote Originally Posted by am7 View Post
    5) I bought a self contained light to do away with wires, fenix defeats the purpose by offering a wired switch, needless to say I will not bother mounting it but did try it on the light and it worked intermittently no matter how hard and deep the connector was inserted. Feedback definitely not positive.
    Hi there,
    if you are not planing to use remote switch would you consider selling it? If yes, please let me know via PM, thanks

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    278
    [QUOTE=spankone;11523330]
    Quote Originally Posted by Skyraider59 View Post
    I also agree with your point Neg 3, the long bolt, lucky this is under the light so you wont stab yourself on it, but this is unusually long and not pleasing to the eyes!
    QUOTE]

    Or course this is for those of us that have the larger 35mm bars. We need the extra thread.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Got it fitted on my Giant Anthem (35mm bar) and the bolt still stick out a good 20mm, could have made it shorter!, but this is just a very minor point, if they monitor the forums, they may adjust the length on the next batch??

  22. #22
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,817
    Quote Originally Posted by Skyraider59 View Post
    Hi, sorry to hear about the battery holder, I was going to say add a little silicone grease to the o ring, I had the same problem with mine being a little difficult to close at first, but I put it down to being new and tight, i never did lube mine, but as loosen up as it no longer required excessive pressure to be able to rotate the lock. What we all want to know now, is how this has been dealt with, from your supplier or Fenix?
    jacob from Fenix did leave me a voice message...all I have to do now is take the time, which I have not had, to contact him back for a RA#, I presume. I've had two Fenix lights before, both the wearable headlamps, and they are the only lights I will consider using. Usually an excellent product experience, for me.

    I'm sure they will take care of the issue with this bike light.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: elco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    68
    Here are pictures of the light output of my own Fenix BC30.


    These were taken on village roads near my place at around 8 in the evening. The camera was a Samsung Galaxy S5 at full-auto settings. Exposure, white balance and ISO settings were all untouched. The only post-processing step done was to resize the photos from 5312 x 2988 pixels down to 960 x 540 pixels. Nothing was changed in the contrast, brightness and color of the resulting photos.








    First, a baseline photo with the BC30 switched off.



    I am approximately 50 meters (≈165 feet) from the two white globe lights at the end of the road. There is a yellow street light behind me, and you can see my shadow on the road in front of the bike.







    This is the lowest setting - 100 lumens.



    I find this output is actually enough to light up the road. It's what I use most of the time. Any potholes on the road are easily seen well ahead of your path, and you can take early steps to avoid them. The box of the BC30 says "dual distance beam." It really is so. There is light just ahead of the bike and more light further away. At this setting, the BC30 can give 20 hours from two fully-charged 18650 lithium-ion batteries.






    This is the second setting - 200 lumens.



    There is a nice spread of light in front, and the grass and tree trunk on the right side is just barely visible. Up to 11 hours at this brightness on the BC30. And at this setting, you will not glare any oncoming motorists, even if they are in low cars or cars with lowered suspensions. Confirmed by several of my friends.







    This is the third setting - 500 lumens.



    Now the tree trunk on the right can be clearly seen. The good thing is that the "hotspot" isn't just a spot. It is a long trapezoid of light that extends from just in front of the bike to the far end of the illuminated region. This is unlike the budget bike light I used to have who's hotspot was small and circular. The BC30 will last 5 hours in this mode, and is just as bright or even brighter than most halogen scooter headlights.







    This is the fourth setting - 1,200 lumens.



    The light is intensely bright and the tree behind the first one is now clearly visible. The BC30 can give just under 2 hours at this brightness but is easily twice as bright as most halogen scooter headlights.







    And this is with my finger on the remote "instant burst" switch - 1,800 lumens.



    Although the Samsung Galaxy S5 I was using captured the intensity of the light, its white balance changed a bit as most of the image was lit up. Note the night sky at the top of the photo is a slightly different color from that of the preceding photos. Also, please note this is a "temporary" mode, not to be used for more than a few seconds at a time as doing so will quickly drain the batteries.








    Here is a short video of the "instant burst" 1,800 lumen output, taken around 12 feet away from a parked delivery truck. The BC30 was initially in its lowest 100 lumen mode.



    Note how the white wall at the left gets lit up all the way to the end.

    Imagine that truck was a group of eternally distracted pedestrians who walk on the street instead of on the sidewalk, with their earphones on as they type away on their cellphones. Saying "excuse me" doesn't work as they won't hear you. So just press the "instant burst" button as you approach. When they turn behind to look, give it another quick press and watch as they scurry like cats towards the sidewalk with astounded looks on their faces, leaving your path free and clear.

    The result? Less stress and anger for you and a more enjoyable ride altogether!

    PRICELESS!








    And here's another video of the "instant burst" 1,800 lumen output, around 30 feet away from an unlit sidewalk. Again, the BC30 was initially in its lowest 100 lumen mode.









    Overall, I give the BC30 the highest marks - a full five stars. I am seriously impressed with this bike light. Highly recommended for bike commuters or anyone who rides at night or in the early morning. It not only serves for you to be seen by other evening motorists, it is definitely a light to see with. And the "instant burst" mode is very useful!

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    278
    Thanks very much for posting your beam shots, like you I think the BC30 is a very good light with a fantastic beam. I am not a lover of the instant burst mode as I use it for MTB, I would have preferred a standard switch. For me the only let down is there switch, great with fingerless glove, but no good in the winter with gloves, some time I have to press that switch half a dozen time for it to change mode, and back home or during the summer no problem, change mode with every press!!!

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: elco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by Skyraider59 View Post
    Thanks very much for posting your beam shots, like you I think the BC30 is a very good light with a fantastic beam. I am not a lover of the instant burst mode as I use it for MTB, I would have preferred a standard switch. For me the only let down is there switch, great with fingerless glove, but no good in the winter with gloves, some time I have to press that switch half a dozen time for it to change mode, and back home or during the summer no problem, change mode with every press!!!
    Yes, I've tried pressing the switch with full-finger gloves. If the material of the gloves is thin, no problem. But the material of thicker gloves will compress before the switch activates. I find the instant burst mode good for bike commuters on city roads. Not so useful on mountain trails if you are the first biker in a group, but quite useful if you are behind and you need to signal those ahead that you need to stop.

    Have you tried the Busch & Muller Ixon IQ Premium? I don't have a source for one where I live, but I think, from a bike commuter's point of view, it would be nice to do a side-by-side comparison with the Fenix BC30.

    I was told the Ixon's got a great horizontal cutoff.



    (Photo from here: Busch & Mόller: IQ-Premium)

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. New Fenix BC30 - twin xml-2 bike light
    By whokilledJR in forum Lights and Night Riding
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 12-09-2014, 06:05 AM
  2. Replies: 17
    Last Post: 10-20-2014, 04:11 PM
  3. Fenix BC30 Bike Light, Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6 review
    By Skyraider59 in forum Lights and Night Riding
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-04-2014, 01:32 PM
  4. Fenix BC30 Bike Light - Dual distance beam -Twin XM-L2 T6
    By Skyraider59 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-03-2014, 12:57 PM
  5. Dual beam, Twin XM-L New Cycle light from SPARK: SB100
    By Skyraider59 in forum Lights and Night Riding
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-13-2014, 03:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •