Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 45
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    897

    Brightest tail lights?

    I see the dinotte series and this other design shine or whatever it was as being the brightest so far. Are there any challengers?

  2. #2
    h79
    h79 is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    13
    I'll just join your question - I'm also looking for a bright tail light

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vapezilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    229
    I have this light and it is super bright http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1097545_-1___400159

    I originally had this light which is cheaper and just as super bright to but I lost it http://www.cateye.com/en/products/detail/TL-LD1100/

    Anyways regardless of which one they are retarded bright and when I did group rides people behind me would ***** about them being way to bright

    Anyways I chose the light and motion to replace the Cateye as I liked the design and how it mounts I did just find my Cateye a few weeks after I got the light and motion and I will compare brightness and get back but just to let you know out of every cyclist I have ever seen I have yet to see a light brighter then these 2 they are super bright

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    340
    Im using the Cygolite Hotshot, I can't say that its the brightest but I'm sure its a contender plus its not as expensive as the others and not to mention built in rechargeable battery.

    Sent from my HTC Sensation 4G using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    897
    Those aren't bright at all. I'm talking about a whole different class of light.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vapezilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    229
    Well i have seen the new dinotte the one that is one peice and it was just as bright as my light and motion so I went with the light and motion because it was half the price and seemed same in build quality beleive me I'm no penny pincher I only buy based on build quality

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Cat-man-do's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3,926
    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Those aren't bright at all. I'm talking about a whole different class of light.
    Well pretty much I think you had it nailed with your OP. Those are probably the brightest.
    The RedZone 4 might come close to the output of a Dinotte 300R but I can't say for sure. Regardless, nothing is going to beat the Designshine.

    As far as lesser self-contained rear lights go I'm glad to hear that more manufacturers are using brighter LED's. If the L&M Vis series has gotten brighter I might want to see if I can check one out. Currently my favorite is the Moon Shield. While probably not as bright as the DiNotte, it is smaller, cost about a fourth as much and has a very nice output and beam pattern. The Cygolite Hotshot is about as bright as the Shield but doesn't have the beam spread of the Shield. If Cygolite ever fixes that I would favor the HotShot. In the mean time I feel very safe using the Shield. The output is awesome and more than enough to satisfy my personal needs.

    When it comes to rear lights more light is always welcome. More light though means more power drain. If you're looking for something capable of outputting over 200 lumen
    it will have to have a much bigger footprint or use external batteries if it is to have any decent amount of run time. So far that's not something I'm willing to deal with.

  8. #8
    Eh?
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    24
    ^ Can you tell me where I can purchase the Moon Shield? I have searched it on eBay and found a place in the UK to purchase from for around $50-$60. Are there any other places?
    --Trevor--
    Vancouver, BC, Canada

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pigmode's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    222
    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Those aren't bright at all. I'm talking about a whole different class of light.

    Agree. Admittedly I have only used my Dinotte 400R a few times at night, but have not had any complaints. I still need to get a 300R (someday). Dealing with the battery gets tiresome, as I use it mostly for pre-dawn road training rides, which also routes through 45mph mountain summit twin tunnels.

    I like Dinotte's reliability, so am not looking for magic in my shine.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Cat-man-do's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3,926
    Quote Originally Posted by rovert View Post
    ^ Can you tell me where I can purchase the Moon Shield? I have searched it on eBay and found a place in the UK to purchase from for around $50-$60. Are there any other places?
    I bought mine from the "Wheelies" UK vendor on e-bay. It only took about 5-6 days. The only problem I had was that I broke the clip on mine. When I tried to e-mail the vendor I never got a response

    The Moon Shield has a sister product, the Serfas TL-60 which is almost identical to the Shield. The only difference being the menu. The shield has three steady modes ( L-M-H ) and two flash modes ( L-fast strobe, H-flash ) I consider the L-fast strobe useless. All other modes are fine. The TL-60 has 2 steady modes ( L-H ) and two flash modes ( L-H )
    I really can't say which one is better but I'm very happy with the Shield. If you get one though don't try to use it with just the clip. The clip is very thin and brittle. As long as you use the included rubber mount you are fine.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Climber25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    135
    Exposure Lights will be introducing a new rear taillight for 2013 called the Blaze in the next couple of weeks. Stay tuned.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,031
    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Those aren't bright at all. I'm talking about a whole different class of light.
    The Hotshot's on-axis intensity is higher than a DiNotte 300R, if you weren't aware of that. Of the existing DiNotte line, I believe the 140R still has the highest centerline intensity; it was demonstrably higher than my 300R (beamshots available if you want). I gave the 140 away after getting the 300R, and sold the 300R on Ebay after getting a couple Hotshots. They're all good lights, but the price/performance/weight mix of the Hotshot is really attractive.

    I have a RZ4 too. It puts out a lot of light on maximum, and has a very eye-catching quad-burst strobe pattern as the default, but spreads the light across an extremely wide area, so I think it's at its best in a city environment where side visibility is quite valuable. The superwide pattern does create a serious ground-effect behind the bike on dry surfaces in the dark.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    897
    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    The Hotshot's on-axis intensity is higher than a DiNotte 300R, if you weren't aware of that. Of the existing DiNotte line, I believe the 140R still has the highest centerline intensity; it was demonstrably higher than my 300R (beamshots available if you want). I gave the 140 away after getting the 300R, and sold the 300R on Ebay after getting a couple Hotshots. They're all good lights, but the price/performance/weight mix of the Hotshot is really attractive.

    I have a RZ4 too. It puts out a lot of light on maximum, and has a very eye-catching quad-burst strobe pattern as the default, but spreads the light across an extremely wide area, so I think it's at its best in a city environment where side visibility is quite valuable. The superwide pattern does create a serious ground-effect behind the bike on dry surfaces in the dark.

    Ever tried a 400r?

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Cat-man-do's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3,926
    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    The Hotshot's on-axis intensity is higher than a DiNotte 300R, if you weren't aware of that. Of the existing DiNotte line, I believe the 140R still has the highest centerline intensity; it was demonstrably higher than my 300R (beamshots available if you want). I gave the 140 away after getting the 300R, and sold the 300R on Ebay after getting a couple Hotshots. They're all good lights, but the price/performance/weight mix of the Hotshot is really attractive.

    I have a RZ4 too. It puts out a lot of light on maximum, and has a very eye-catching quad-burst strobe pattern as the default, but spreads the light across an extremely wide area, so I think it's at its best in a city environment where side visibility is quite valuable. The superwide pattern does create a serious ground-effect behind the bike on dry surfaces in the dark.
    Mech I have to agree with almost all your observations. I looked at some of those youtube videos you've done and they are spot on. The Hotshot is a gem of a rear light. Like you said though it is very intense when viewed on axis. That's the issue though, not all roads are straight. That being the case I feel you are better served having at least one light that provides a wider beam. On the other hand I think the RZ4 might have over-done the omni-directional issue a bit in their attempt to cover all the bases. As such it is not as intense as I would have hoped when viewed on axis. Regardless I'd rather have a RZ4 on my seat post simply because I feel it will be seen from wider angles better. Now if the Hot Shot comes out with a wider lens ( similar to a Moon Shield ) I will get a new one right away.

    I think the main reason people gravitate towards a light like the DesignShine or the DiNotte 300R / 400R is that they want something bright enough to draw attention during the day. My way of handling that problem is to use an amber light on the rear of the bike. Something in the range of 300 lumen or more should do the trick. In the mean time I think that the current crop of rear led lights is doing very well to alert motorist of the presence of cyclist at dusk or at night. One on the seat post and one on the helmet seems to cover all the bases.

    Last but not least, the Hot Shot has a feature that allows you to adjust the output on the steady mode to super low in case you want to ride with a group and not blind or annoy your fellow riders.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,031
    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Ever tried a 400r?
    Not in person, but a BikeForums member confirms that his Hotshot's direct beam is brighter than his 400R. DiNotte themselves say that the 400R is only a little brighter than the 300R. DiNotte canned their top taillight a few years ago, a red version of their 600L headlight. Now THAT I would've liked to see. They called it the XLS. Quote: "This is not for the faint of heart!! Please use responsibly."

    The downside is that the Hotshot is very focused, so aiming it properly is really important, whereas the DiNottes have a very wide beam and aim's not critical. Some people also like the larger physical size of the DiNottes, on the grounds that a larger target may be easier to notice. If you're a fan of DiNottes, the 300R is your best bet, I think... less weight than a 140R, bright enough for daytime visibility, easier to move from bike to bike than a 140 or a 400, and I think they lowered the price since I bought mine.

    If you want something beyond the norm, the DesignShine does look great. Here's a comparison video between the DesignShine and a DiNotte 400R: DiNotte 400R and DesignShine DS-500 Comparision 1 - YouTube

    That's the issue though, not all roads are straight.
    In my various favorite routes, there aren't many places where this could actually matter. At 500 meters, a 10-degree beam is about 85 meters wide. A road with a sufficiently-tight sweep that the viewer is outside the hot spot until panic range, and yet not obstructed from seeing me by a hill or building... nothing's coming to mind here. I think a better argument for wide beams is the one NiteFlux uses... someone in an adjacent lane at very close range, in a visually "noisy" environment, could conceivably miss a light with a narrow beam. But I'm reaching a bit, since I personally find strobing lights catch my eye very well, and particularly in peripheral vision.

    Now if the Hot Shot comes out with a wider lens ( similar to a Moon Shield ) I will get a new one right away.
    Well, there's the NiteRider Solas coming out, looks like a Hotshot-alike but with the rippled beamspreader from their Cherry Bomb. I think these are supposed to be out in a month or two.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Cat-man-do's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3,926
    I was looking the other night on Youtube and found a video of a guy from Texas who had a DiNotte 300R on a recumberant. He was comparing it to his previous Cateye rear light which I thought was doing a very good job. It turned out that the 300R thru most of the video was pointed somewhat *downward. ( * He said he does this so it doesn't blind on coming traffic... ) ( **tell me this guy doesn't look like he could be G. Bush's brother... )

    Afterward he points it upward and there is a world of difference. The mixed pulsed flash/steady on the 300R is a nice setting and is very "attention getting", IMO. If the 300R wasn't so expensive I might have considered buying one. I sure would like to see a comparison of the 300R to the Moon Shield.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,031
    Quote Originally Posted by Cat-man-do View Post
    I was looking the other night on Youtube and found a video of a guy from Texas who had a DiNotte 300R on a recumberant. He was comparing it to his previous Cateye rear light which I thought was doing a very good job. It turned out that the 300R thru most of the video was pointed somewhat *downward. ( * He said he does this so it doesn't blind on coming traffic... ) ( **tell me this guy doesn't look like he could be G. Bush's brother... )

    Afterward he points it upward and there is a world of difference. The mixed pulsed flash/steady on the 300R is a nice setting and is very "attention getting", IMO. If the 300R wasn't so expensive I might have considered buying one. I sure would like to see a comparison of the 300R to the Moon Shield.
    The 300R's beam pattern is a massive flood, so he must've had it aimed REALLY badly.



    As for blinding traffic, my DiNottes, my Hotshot and my Nova BULL emergency-vehicle strobe have all gotten unsolicited praise from motorists. They like me showing up well and from long distances, is the general theme.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    897
    The 400r is about 250 lumens if anyone is wondering.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    151
    Quote Originally Posted by Climber25 View Post
    Exposure Lights will be introducing a new rear taillight for 2013 called the Blaze in the next couple of weeks. Stay tuned.
    Do you know any more details yet?
    I hope Exposure review their pricing for 2013. They make really good stuff, but I don't think people really want to pay such a premium for their exquisit machining etc. Most people who want to throw their dollar at the high end of the market want performance!
    If I payed three times as much on a tail light as I did on say a Moon Shield, I'd expect it to be at least three times as powerful.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    151
    I just remembered that there was a guy here on mbtr a few years back that made a 750 lumen tail light.
    I think he went by the name of "Hahntronix" or something similar to that.
    Can anyone remember the details?

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pethelman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    295
    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    Not in person, but a BikeForums member confirms that his Hotshot's direct beam is brighter than his 400R. DiNotte themselves say that the 400R is only a little brighter than the 300R. DiNotte canned their top taillight a few years ago, a red version of their 600L headlight.
    Another interesting taillight "intensity comparison" video on youtube:
    DesignShine DS-500 versus various - YouTube

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pigmode's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    222
    Quote Originally Posted by Cat-man-do View Post
    I was looking the other night on Youtube and found a video of a guy from Texas who had a DiNotte 300R on a recumberant.


    Thanks for the great vid.

    You might recall there was a discussion a few weeks ago concerning the efficacy of Dinotte's Flash mode, where the light goes into an "ultra low power setting" keeping the light on between strobes.

    That video corresponds with my visual sense that as a single rear light user, the Dinotte feature of a strobe mode which does not blink completely off, has some definite advantages.

    ymmv

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pethelman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    295
    Quote Originally Posted by pigmode View Post
    Thanks for the great vid.

    You might recall there was a discussion a few weeks ago concerning the efficacy of Dinotte's Flash mode, where the light goes into an "ultra low power setting" keeping the light on between strobes.

    That video corresponds with my visual sense that as a single rear light user, the Dinotte feature of a strobe mode which does not blink completely off, has some definite advantages.

    ymmv
    Very true... steady on with slightly higher power "pulsing" at night is good to help garner attention but not totally destroy depth perception.

    In the day, however, on/off flashing is preferable, at least to my eyes.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pigmode's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    222
    Quote Originally Posted by pethelman View Post
    Very true... steady on with slightly higher power "pulsing" at night is good to help garner attention but not totally destroy depth perception.

    In the day, however, on/off flashing is preferable, at least to my eyes.


    Very good point in regards to daylight use. :thumbs up:

    I would guess another potential advantage of "steady on" flash mode would be a lessoning of the disorienting effect often attributed to strobe lights. I continue to be impressed with the thought and care put into the Dinotte design.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pethelman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    295
    Quote Originally Posted by pigmode View Post
    Very good point in regards to daylight use. :thumbs up:

    I would guess another potential advantage of "steady on" flash mode would be a lessoning of the disorienting effect often attributed to strobe lights. I continue to be impressed with the thought and care put into the Dinotte design.
    I agree. Dinotte is definitely one of the pioneers in the bike lighting world... to be commended at every level.

    With the new customizable flash modes available in the latest version of the TaskLED family of drivers, I'm finally able to do something similar. Optimized patterns for day and night in the same light. Here's a short video showing the default standards that I came up with, but the firmware allows the end user to define a flash pattern however they like.

    DesignShine_Flash_Patterns.mp4 - YouTube

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •