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  1. #1
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    what is yellow wire in niterider battery pack?

    alright, so i have looked and cannot find the answer.

    background - i just picked up a used niterider battery pack. it didn't hold a charge right away so i am cycling it a few times to see if that helps. if not, i will have to either have it rebuilt or rebuilt it myself. i have done this for drill and R/C batteries, but they only used 2 wires.

    so i am trying to figure out why there is a 3rd wire before i begin to deconstruct it. anyone know what it is for? are there any diagrams out there?

    thanks
    it's fun to do bad things

  2. #2
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    It connects to a thermistor inside the pack used to measure pack temperature. It's not always used. It depends on the specific model of battery and charger. I don't remember exactly which models do and don't use it.

  3. #3
    Off the back...
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    He's lying! DON"T TOUCH THE YELLOW WIRE!!!!! Nooooooooo!

    [hides behind couch]






  4. #4
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    i took apart a different pack (waterbottle pack) and found that it had two wires only. so i guess it is not necessary to have a useful pack.
    thanks for the info.
    it's fun to do bad things

  5. #5
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    lol @ pinkrobe
    ...Scun.thorpe, UK

  6. #6
    Do It Yourself
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    As MtbMacgyver said, it's not always used. However, that doesn't mean it's not important. Temperature (ΔT) is the best charge termination method for nickle based batteries so I would try to reuse the themistor and keep the third wire if you can.
    Long Live Long Rides

  7. #7
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    if by charge termination you mean the charger knowing when to shut off, i am not sure that is accurate. i always understood peak voltage to be the measurement of choice. i have a peak voltage charger that i like to use. i am considering making a plug adapter to use that on these batteries.

    also, with that charger, i can use a higher charge rate which would mean less time on the charger.
    it's fun to do bad things

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by broncojd78
    if by charge termination you mean the charger knowing when to shut off, i am not sure that is accurate. i always understood peak voltage to be the measurement of choice. i have a peak voltage charger that i like to use. i am considering making a plug adapter to use that on these batteries.

    also, with that charger, i can use a higher charge rate which would mean less time on the charger.
    Peak voltage detection is what most chargers use, because it's cheapest. But delta temperature is the most reliable termination method and is supported by most high end chargers.

    Higher charge rate does mean less time on the charger, but the trade-off is shorter battery lifetime.

  9. #9
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    interesting. i thought you wanted to match the charge rate to the capacity of the battery? 2500mah = 2.5 amp charge rate. 5000mah = 5.0 charge rate.

    the chargers that came with the batteries are 2.0 or the fast chargers are 2.5. but the batteries have a higher capacity than 2500mah. is that inaccurate?

    edit
    it doesn't really matter. just remembered my battery charger only charges up to 7 cell pack.
    it's fun to do bad things

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