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  1. #1
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    soldering to 332MC pins?

    Hi all, I actually have two questions:

    Any tips for soldering to these pins? I have a thermostatic soldering station and 22awg stranded wire. Do you bend the stripped end at 90deg and then just snake the wires around the lenses? I'm worried that I will snap the pins if I bend after soldering. Is it bad to use extra flux?

    How much thermal epoxy is recommended, and where should I press on the disk to seat it? Just don't want to damage anything - I only have one shot!

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Definitely pre-bend the wires.
    Press on the optic to seat the PCB. (that's what I did anyhoo)

  3. #3
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    Thanks. I'm thinking to do all the routing before soldering. Good idea about the optic.

  4. #4
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    I chickened out thinking I'd destroy it with my impressive destructive abilities with electronics. I got them to solder it for me - they have given me fantastic service I can't recommed them enough. I can't wait to get it!

  5. #5
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    I should solder before mounting, correct?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sodium
    I should solder before mounting, correct?
    Most likely yes. But it depends on the housing you're putting it into. If your housing allows access to the solder points then no worries. However most housings have the board recessed making access to the solder pins a bit difficult with the board in place.

  7. #7
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    Almost there! I actually have a choice as to whether the LEDs are recessed or not. At first they are not, but I will put an Al ring, and then glass. I think I will solder first, so if I F it up, I'm not left with a hosed board glued to the housing I spent so much time on. What temp is everybody using for this job? 700F too hot? Thanks - hopefully will get to turn it on this eve!

  8. #8
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    Wiped the glass with iso, but apparently didn't get clean. Oh well it's still really bright, just not as pretty as it could have been. Also, used superglue, and I think the vapors screwed up the lens a bit. Not sure though.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails soldering to 332MC pins?-lite1.jpg  

    soldering to 332MC pins?-lite2.jpg  


  9. #9
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    I like the mode control options. The smooth mode is cool. Running 4x 18650s in a luminousdiy box that fits nicely in a cell phone holder that came with my backpack.

  10. #10
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    thanks Sodium!
    Congratulations you succeeded with your build.

    Regarding the soldering, I use super-flexible silicone thermal resistant wires:


    The conductor area is 0.25mm^2. The strand is very thin, only 0.05mm in diameter which provides astonishing flexibility. This type of wire is easy to trace between components and optic legs. I use an industrial soldering station with automatic feeder which let to control the amount of solder (it should be minimized as on the picture)

  11. #11
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    Cool, I'll look for that wire for next time. BTW, the instruction manual doesn't mention how you actually adjust the ECO level. It just says how to get into the mode where you CAN program it. Also, I figured out on my own that using a short click of the momentary button when in 20 or 2% mode will soft toggle between 2 and 100% - don't think the manual says that.

    Might build a taillight next. Any chance of an MC version with a single high intensity red LED?

  12. #12
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    Q, nice soldering BUT - the wire colors are opposite of conventional.

    The 332 has no effective reverse polarity protection, so anyone wiring to that photo is likely to kill their LED engine.

    Suggest you swap it for a photo with the normal red = +ve.

  13. #13
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    All my wires are white!

  14. #14
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    Some of my best wires are black...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark2c
    Q, nice soldering BUT - the wire colors are opposite of conventional.
    .
    oops!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark2c
    Some of my best wires are black...
    Nice!!!

  17. #17
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    As a heads up, don't use superglue to seal a cavity that has the optics in it. The vapors dissolve some polymer and redistribute it, especially to any fingerprints or imperfections. I cleaned everything with iso, but apparently missed a smudge on the optic itself, and I can see the streaks from where I wiped the glass covering with iso.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sodium
    As a heads up, don't use superglue to seal a cavity that has the optics in it. The vapors dissolve some polymer and redistribute it, especially to any fingerprints or imperfections. I cleaned everything with iso, but apparently missed a smudge on the optic itself, and I can see the streaks from where I wiped the glass covering with iso.
    There is a type of superglue (cyanoacrylate) that is suitable for mounting optics. Look for a specification of "low bloom" when ordering.

    Another common sealant mistake is using acidic cure silicone (the most common type). It releases acetic acid fumes as it cures. This can cause corrosion on PCB's and solder joints. Look for "neutral cure" in the specs for a silicone that does not release the acidic fumes.

  19. #19
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    Ah good to know, thanks. I actually used it to stick the glass coverplate on - the optic was just used to squish the 332 down into the thermal epoxy, so I assume it is stuck there permanently. Is this low bloom stuff available from common hardware stores, or do I need to do an online order? Is it one of these:

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#super-glue/=8mgsg7

  20. #20
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    I can't see 'neutral cure' listed on that website for the silicone. Would that equate to non-corrosive, or do I need to look beyond mcmaster? Cheers, had a good ride down to the gastropub with the new light. It's bright, probably on par with my quite old 10w halide from lume lighting.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by sodium
    Is this low bloom stuff available from common hardware stores, or do I need to do an online order? Is it one of these:

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#super-glue/=8mgsg7
    Yes, the Loctite 403 is the exact product I have used for optic mounting in laser speed measuring instruments.

    Quote Originally Posted by sodium
    I can't see 'neutral cure' listed on that website for the silicone. Would that equate to non-corrosive, or do I need to look beyond mcmaster?
    Yes, the "non-corrosive" equates to a neutral cure type silicone.

    The super glue is not likely to be found at a retail level, I order it from McMaster. I have seen the neutral cure type silicone at the retail level. It is usually noted as being low odor or no odor in the labeling. Red Devil 887 is what I have used.

    Another glue that others have had good success with that will not harm electronics is a product called Goop. Lowes or other hardware type stores carry it.

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