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  1. #1
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    Santa's Workshop

    A few weeks ago I decided to make bike lights for family and friends for Christmas.



    Everybody got to pick the color so it ended up being a nice test of lots of different anodizing dye colors. Turns out having a fixed deadline is good for productivity. I would never had finished this many so quickly otherwise. I just finished them this afternoon, just in the nick of time.

  2. #2
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    I wish I was one of your friends/family.

  3. #3
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    Great stuff, could be a very bright Christmas tree somewhere me thinks.

  4. #4
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    Incredible collection there. Nice work.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldMTBfreak
    I wish I was one of your friends/family.
    +1

  6. #6
    Single Speed Junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by racerdave
    +1
    +2 and err +3 for the little one

  7. #7
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    I'll settle for a Dark blue one...Thanks Santa..

  8. #8
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    I'd like the black one, bottom right Please Santa

    Nice collection, well done.

    Regards
    Tom

  9. #9
    Do It Yourself
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    I get a red one!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Santa's Workshop-chrislight.jpg  

    Long Live Long Rides

  10. #10
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    I really like that housing, Did you cut it yourself? Where could I get one and for how much?

  11. #11
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    I machine them on a small desktop CNC lathe and mill. Sorry, I'm not interested in selling lights. This is basically a hobby and selling them would turn the hobby into too much of a job.....

  12. #12
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    Oh I understand. I didn't know you actually CNC'd them yourself. It's still a rad light!

  13. #13
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    name and source for this desktop cnc ?
    It is possible for rice to absorb other odors in storage. Or could be the quality of water in it was prepared. Mahatma Rice

  14. #14
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    I would be interested to know also... I'm thinking about a drill press with milling vise, but a desktop CNC... that would be kewl....

  15. #15
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    I didn't buy a complete turnkey CNC setup. I started with manual machines that were CNC ready. CNC ready means they have mounts on the machine for the stepper motors, but the motors and electronics to drive the CNC are not included. Here is the package I have for the basic machines. I bought these 10 years ago and used them completely manually for the first 5 years.

    http://www.sherlinedirect.com/index....Product_ID=749

    Later I pieced together the CNC control system myself. Bought and installed the control stepper motors. Put together the drive electronics using Gecko G201 drivers. http://www.geckodrive.com/ I use EMC as the control software running on a linux based PC. http://linuxcnc.org/

    I didn't buy the turnkey Sherline CNC setup because it came out after I bought the mill and lathe. But it's pretty similar to what I have. So if you want a turnkey solution it would be a lot less work to go with this. I did spend less money putting my system together, but it was a ton of work.

    http://www.sherlinedirect.com/index....Product_ID=190

    In hindsight, it was a really good path to use the machine manually for quite a while before getting into CNC. You have to know how to manually machine to be successful at CNC. CNC just lets you feed the all the machining operations into a computer to make the process repeatable and automated. You still have to know what the proper machining operations are with appropriate feed rates, depths of cut, and spindle speeds. I'm not sure how you'd know that without knowing how to do manual machining.

  16. #16
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    For the lights in this thread. About 60% of the machining operation are done on the lathe and 40% on the mill.

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