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  1. #1
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    Quick Q on Camera settings

    Hi all.

    I'm wondering what camera settings, specifically, you guys are using for beam shots of the XP-G and XM-L LEDs. Please.

    ISO
    F?
    EXP
    W/B

    Thanks in advance.



    Luminous

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    MrLee.

    Thank you very much sir. Seem to be the old settings.

    I must have got my wires crossed as I thought a new setting had been agreed to cope with the higher outputs of the XP-G and XM-L.

    Obviously I was wrong.

    Cheers muchly.


  4. #4
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    I think this is the thread you're looking for.

    MTBR Standard Camera Settings for High Power Lights

  5. #5
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    Although I'm not sure anyone is using them.

  6. #6
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    MtbMacgyver.

    Thanks for that, I thought there had been some discussion on this issue, hence my referring to XP-Gs and XM-Ls, although I had forgotten the 3000 lumen activation point for the alternative settings.

    Previous beam shots for lights with XP-G, on the original settings just seem so bright, but I guess its more about staying consistent and in line with the rest of the folk on here, so we can get a realistic comparison, as far as one can with pictures alone.

    Really appreciate the help guys.

    Thanks.

  7. #7
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    I use 2s and white balance (can't adjust the rest) as a 6s exposure is way brighter than the light looks in person and tends to wash out the beam pattern. Most people on here are more interested in beam shape/ pattern than relative brightness, which can be affected by lots of other variables (humidity, terrain, etc).

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