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  1. #1
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    New question here. Lupine Wilma 6 vs. NR TriNewt Wireless

    Obvious differences:
    1. $! $695 for the Wilma 6 and $499 for the wireless TriNewt.
    2. Lumens! Wilma-830 Lumens and TriNewt 486.

    TriNewt
    Wireless
    (3)LED Li-Ion
    3 Light Settings: High / Low / Flash
    Wireless Remote
    Low Battery Indicator
    486 Lumens
    3:30-7:00 HR Regulated Run Times Borofloat Lens

    SYSTEM INCLUDES
    LED Headlamp
    Helmet Mount
    Li-Ion Battery
    Extension Cable
    Handlebar Mount - Fits up to 31.8mm
    4 HR Smart Charger


    VS.


    Wilma 6
    (4)LED Li-Ion
    Manual 15W High Power LED
    15į
    830 LUMENS
    15W:4 hours
    9W:6 hours 30 minutes
    1W:42 hours
    6.8 Ah Li-Ion softcase battery
    Micro Charger
    4 hours
    PCS V6 Switch, 3 beam settings, capacity control
    Helmet Mount
    455g


    So, the question is the difference in the $ vs. Lumens! I am basing my decision upon YOUR responses, good or bad! Thanks again!
    [SIZE="2"]"You don't stop playing because you get old, you get old because you stop playing!" - Unigeezer [/SIZE]

  2. #2
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    my 0.2$

    Trinewt is a little wider for what I've seen in pictures and it cost less but those are the only points in favor of the NR.
    Lupine reputation and reliability is not even comparable to NR (Sorry)
    You can program everything in the Wilma: power consumption, 2 or 3 diming settings, you can choose at which power output (15.12,10) you want those settings, not only 12%, 25%, 40%,60%, 75% or 100%, but a stepless diming setting, reserve tank (capacity control).
    Lupine is lighter plus the craftmanship of Lupine again, it's not even comparable to NR. (NR looks like cheap plastic to me-just my opinion)
    The other benefit is that every Lupine component is interchangeable, not like NR where you can't use your old battery or extension cord. With Lupine everything is.
    Plus, Lupine offers upgrades as technology moves so you will not need to sell your trinewt to get a better beam or power output. Just change the LEDs with a "do it yourself" kit!
    If you have the money, I think it saves you money on the long run and worth every penny
    Other thing is the Bling factor but less important for me
    I have the Wilma and is a piece of art

  3. #3
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    From the bikemag test concerning the Wilma:

    [I]While the Wilma functioned flawlessly, itís battery pack and helmet mount raised some eyebrows. The pack, which is fairly lightweight and of minimal size, uses a basic clip to secure a small strap around the stem, downtube or elsewhere. The flimsy clip was tough to cinch down tightly, but I found a good home for the battery sandwiched between the toptube and seat tube, hanging just above the shock on my Santa Cruz Blur. Others may have a harder time with it.



    The helmet mount looked even scarier: a web of Velcro attaches a small mounting foot to the helmet. The light attaches to that foot via a tube of plastic thatís the same width as a handlebar. It might look scary, but I found the mount was easy to install, kept the light secure and most importantly, didnít slide, bob, dip or shake during the ride. Ditto for when the light was mounted directly to the handlebar through the same rubber O-ring that connects it to the helmet mount. There might be better helmet mount systems out there, but Lupineís system worked fine for me, although some others had less success with it.[/I]


    Looking at the beamshots, I think the trinewt is very competitive. I just ordered a trinewt based upon their test, beam shots and pricing. I intend on using my Princeton tech Switchback 3 on the helmet and the trinewt on the bars. I am looking forward to riding with a good light system for the first time ever.

  4. #4
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    I went with the Wilma for a few reasons:

    MUCH lighter weight (125 grams versus 225 grams- both approximate). This was a huge deal fro me since I wanted a light for the helmet.
    Quality- there really is not contest here. NR has already had a charger problem with the Beam width- Trinewt and have had numerous problems with their HIDs, even given their high sales.
    Width- the Trinewt seems to have a wider beam- an advantage in my opinon as long as it doens't give up much reach.
    LED Upgrades- with Lupine, the upgrade is a DIY. With NR, this is what I was told and I'm not sure if this is accurate and I'm paraphrasing:

    NR Rep: I'm not sure about upgrades to LED lights since we have not done one but you can just buy a new lighthead.

    As far as the mounts go, I think the rubber mount of the Lupines is extrememly solid and well-designed and the helmet mount is very good and stays in its place.

    The quality and weight were the big selling points. I also wanted to use a headband eventually and use the light for other purposes. The Trinewt is a light I would only use on the bars and the beam is very good but the quality and weight leaned heavily in favor of the Wilma so I bought that. As far as light quality goes, I think both are very good. After buying the Wilma, I just had to buy the Betty for the bar though I did look at the Trinewt again for the bar (weight not an issue here). I also looked at the 600L (wide lens) and the Nightlighting iBlaast but spent the bucks and got the Betty.

    So the Trinewt has a very good beam and I like the width of the beam more than the Wilma but the Wilma has too many other points that swayed me towards it, especially weight and reliability/quality. James at gearreview will have his review out very soon. See what he says before deciding. I think Francois will also have his review out soon and it should be a good one.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dominator13
    Obvious differences:
    1. $! $695 for the Wilma 6 and $499 for the wireless TriNewt.
    2. Lumens! Wilma-830 Lumens and TriNewt 486.
    I haven't seen the Wilma but I am playing with the Trinewt and the Lupine Betty. Here are my thoughts.

    I would not consider the wireless on the Trinewt. What the heck is wireless for? It's an extra $100. There's a switch on the battery anyway. Wireless is not needed. If you run the Trinewt on the helmet, wireless will be handy since the battery will be in your camelback. But the Trinewt is not ideal for the helmet because of weight. So it's really $400 vs. $700.

    Both have excellent build and craftsmanship. The Trinewt is built like a tank so it's a bit heavy at 632 grams mounted.

    As far as brightness is concerned, Trinewt is 486 lumens and Wilma is 830 lumens. That is the problem with lumens. The Trinewt is measured while the Wilma like almost all other manufacturers is 'claimed'. Look at Bike Magazine test and the the Trinewt looks brighter.
    http://bikemag.com/gear/accessories/LED_Light_Test_1/

    The Wilma is a great light but it is expensive and is not the best value. $700?? The weak dollar is partly to blame.

    I would consider the the Dinotte 600. $400 and comes with two batteries.

    fc
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  6. #6
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    So it's really $400 vs. $700.

    Well it's actually $400 vs. $600 if you go thru Geoman. I actually will be able to get one that was used once in a 24hr for $600. I was wondering about the remote thing, it didn't add up!? I agree that the TriNewt looks brighter and wider but not as deep in the Bikemag review. The other problem I have, which you summed up for me, is that I have an X2 and I didn't know which way to go with the Helmet or Bars debate. I think I'll start off trying the big light on the bars and the X2 on the lid since the weight is quite a bit different. I have not heard much about the DiNotte but you have sparked my interest.

    p.s. You are absolutely right about Aaron and his riding style! I told him to try Corral once before he bombed it but you know his mentallity. He'll be back and riding the same way next time!
    [SIZE="2"]"You don't stop playing because you get old, you get old because you stop playing!" - Unigeezer [/SIZE]

  7. #7
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    My riding group just did a group buy through a bike show and got the tri-newt wireless for $300. I didn't get one so I don't know all the details of the buy but you might be able to find something like that if you ask around. If you could get one for around $3-400 then it would be a better buy than $6-700 Wilma in my opinion.

  8. #8
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    I always go with a lightweight light on the helmet. That was one of the reasons I liked the Wilma. That will always be one of my top two criteria for a helmet light. The weight on the handlebar is not as critical unless the battery is also part of the light. In that case, I'm sure the steering feels quite odd till you get used to the skewed weight distribution. The Trinewt was just so heavy and I didn't want to go above the weight of my L&M ARC (160ish grams).

    I don't know how diff companies are calculating Lumens but I know the Wilma had 4 LEDs while the Trinewt has three. So theoretically, the Wilma should be a bit brighter assuming equal LED light outputs, similar lenses, etc. The lens makes a difference and while the extra LED can make a beam wider, in the Wilma's case, I think it may be arranged so the 4 LEDs throw the light out further while the Trinewt has two LEDs angled a bit while one is straight out and higher. Maybe this is why the Trinewt has the clover-leaf pattern in the beam when seen on a flat road.

    Now take this with a grain of salt but I have also heard that Lupine "diffuses" the beam a bit to give it a better quality and to avoid any bright spots. I'm only saying this in case someone knows more about this more than I do. I have no idea if and how this is done. I can only assume they use the lenses or optics to do this.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dominator13
    So it's really $400 vs. $700.
    I agree that the TriNewt looks brighter and wider but not as deep in the Bikemag review.
    One thing to consider. You mention in the beamshot photos of the two, the Tri has a wider beam, but the Wilma is more deep... What's more important, wider beam when your standing still, or longer through for when your moving?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd@gretnabikes
    One thing to consider. You mention in the beamshot photos of the two, the Tri has a wider beam, but the Wilma is more deep... What's more important, wider beam when your standing still, or longer through for when your moving?
    First of all, you're a Lupine rep. Not that that is a bad thing! I agree but to have a wider beam also helps in moving as well, being able to see the switchbacks and turns better. I have no doubt that I would be happy with both but I am leaning towards the Lupine between these two. Francis has thrown a curveball with the DiNotte! I appreciate all responses, even if they are from a rep!
    [SIZE="2"]"You don't stop playing because you get old, you get old because you stop playing!" - Unigeezer [/SIZE]

  11. #11
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    I went with the Dinotte lights about a month ago and love them. Take a look at the 600l and 200l combo. I got both including spare batteries for each for $539.00 shipped and they are incredible together. I put the 200l on the helmet with the battery strapped to the back of the helmet and the 600l on the bars. The kit also comes with an assortment of cables, mounts, and straps that make it very versatile. I was concerned with the O-ring mount on the 200l but it does not move on the helmet or the bars. This setup seemed like the best value when I purchased it and I have not been dissapointed.

  12. #12
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    Oh yeah! I saw that one aslo. Man, it is going to be hard to beat that one! I might be joining Fracois' "Light Off" this evening and be able to judge them all myself!?
    [SIZE="2"]"You don't stop playing because you get old, you get old because you stop playing!" - Unigeezer [/SIZE]

  13. #13
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    Nice, sounds like a fun evening taking pictures of all those lights.

  14. #14
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    I think everyone needs to look at the Exposure lights...

    since they have won/tied all the recent UK lighting tests from what I've seen. Very similar specs and pricing to others but NO battery pack. All self contained.





    http://www.exposurelightsusa.com/

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by stratmosphere
    since they have won/tied all the recent UK lighting tests from what I've seen. Very similar specs and pricing to others but NO battery pack. All self contained.





    http://www.exposurelightsusa.com/
    No doubt! I saw these in the "light shootout". I won't give any details away but they were definately an eye opener. The only concern is burn time. Just got off the phone with the USA rep and had him explain the batery back-up that they have listed. It is called a "piggy back battery''. This will add 3 hours to both the Joystick and Enduro! Hello! The helmet battery looks to be nothing! The Enduro Maxx battery looks like every other one. This is good for the "safety" factor or racing. I would probably use the joystick back-up and only use the Enduro back-up as needed otherwise these lights would be the same as every other!? The 960 lumen combo is also nice.
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    [SIZE="2"]"You don't stop playing because you get old, you get old because you stop playing!" - Unigeezer [/SIZE]

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dominator13
    No doubt! I saw these in the "light shootout". I won't give any details away but they were definately an eye opener. The only concern is burn time.

    The web site states a burn time for all their lights of 3 hours at high output and lots more at their lower outputs. This seems very good to me.

    Their enduro max at under $500 and listed at 780 lumens seems to be quite a buy.

  17. #17
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    run time...not very long need more than 3hrs...so buy the piggy back battery witch adds cords and ads cost.

  18. #18
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    A friend of mine showed me these. Seemed too good to be true since there is no external battery pack. But after getting the Enduro and the Joystick I can report it's real. No annoying wires!

  19. #19
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    The EnduroMaXx for the bar is fine but heavy since it includes the battery. One could get used to it and put up with the extra weight on the bar for the convenience of not having any wires.

    The Joystick is very nice and light. I personally like more light on the helmet but if you can deal with the beam of one good LED, the Joystick is great. Even though it has a battery, it still weighs around 100 grams. The convenience of not having wires is very nice if you can put up with the associated disadvantages.

  20. #20
    BBW
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    I also looked at them, seem great but you have to send them back to UK to replace the battery right?? that was the disadvantage to me...

  21. #21
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    UK?, I think the importer at www.exposurelightingusa.com takes care of all support here.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf
    The web site states a burn time for all their lights of 3 hours at high output and lots more at their lower outputs. This seems very good to me.

    Their enduro max at under $500 and listed at 780 lumens seems to be quite a buy.
    Some notes about the Enduro. I've been using it for about a month so I'll offer some shootout scoop.

    - They claim 720 lumens. It is not. It looks comparable to the other 500 lumen lights.

    - The weight at 250 grams on the bar is not an issue. It weighs about as much as a Trinewt light head.

    - I've observed run times of over 4 hours on the highest setting.

    - the handlebar mount is genius as it is light, can be aimed left to right is easy to remove and install the light. It is not very crash proof though, it seems.

    fc
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  23. #23
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    Well, with three LEDs, the raw Lumen count would be around 600-750 depending on how/if their LEDs are "over-driven." Anyway, so maybe they do get 720 or whatever they claim for a few minutes or seconds, after which heat management kicks in and lowers the output.
    This may be why run times are longer than claimed at max. The true/practical max output is lower than the "cold" max output. It's either that or the sample LEDs are weaker than normal- unlikely since they probably tested the light before sending it out.

  24. #24
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    exposure in usa

    they are available in USA
    http://www.exposurelightsusa.com/
    think this is the best deal with the piggy back battery

  25. #25
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    Topeak Moonshine

    I rode Fullerton loop with a guy that had that tri-newt on his head. My Topeak Moonshine was just as bright infact @ 500 lumens its brighter all though the naked eye cant tell. And i believe the tri-newt is around $400. The Moonshine was $278 with a wired remote that mounts by the grips and has a headmount strap and a wallet sized litium ion battery all in the box. And it looks frickin cool to.
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