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Thread: light upgrade

  1. #1
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    light upgrade

    i've got an old set of dinotte 200 lights that were good back in the day but now everyone is out shining me. a friend suggested upgrading the light engine to something more efficient. is this doable or even recommended?
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  2. #2
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    yes, but unless you change the current going to the light engine there will be very little increase in light output.

    Changing current means changing the driver circuit board in the light.

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    ditto. If you wanted to gut the light and start over - something like a bflex and a XP-G2 would bump you up to about 485 lumen.



    But if your friends are way outshining you cause they are running 800+ lumen XM-L based lights and such, you still wouldn't be breaking even.

    If you went to an XM-L in there, I'd be concerned about heat dissipation due to the small size of the dinotte 200 housing.

  4. #4
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    from what i was understanding, the newer light engine put out more light because it was more efficient so it didn't use more current. is this not correct?
    I'm never gonna be a Rock Star

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    Quote Originally Posted by Megashnauzer View Post
    from what i was understanding, the newer light engine put out more light because it was more efficient so it didn't use more current. is this not correct?
    Some driver types seem to flow more current as the LED Vf drops. Lower Vf is a characteristic of the newer, more efficient LEDs. I replaced the Luxeon1 in my climbing/backpacking headlamp with an XPG. The original current was ~350mA. The XPG now draws ~450mA. The only reason I could come up with is that the Vf of the XPG is about .4V less than the Luxeon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vancbiker View Post
    Some driver types seem to flow more current as the LED Vf drops. Lower Vf is a characteristic of the newer, more efficient LEDs. I replaced the Luxeon1 in my climbing/backpacking headlamp with an XPG. The original current was ~350mA. The XPG now draws ~450mA. The only reason I could come up with is that the Vf of the XPG is about .4V less than the Luxeon.
    Agreed - but since the dinotte was running what, an XR-E or P3/P4 and was rated @ 200 lumen, they were probably only running ~750-800ma current in the driver. Even if you swapped to a XP-G2 and got another 100-150ma of current, that G2 would be running ~285 lumen. Not worth the $$ or effort IMHO.

  7. #7
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    gotcha. i knew the guy was fos.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Megashnauzer View Post
    from what i was understanding, the newer light engine put out more light because it was more efficient so it didn't use more current. is this not correct?
    I think you're meaning that newer versions of the same series of LED emitters put out more light and require less voltage, when driven at the same current level. This is true - but LED's require a constant current driver of some fashion. What that means is the driver still is supplying the same current, just the more efficient LED will burn a little longer on the same battery. It will also put out a little more light. As Vancbiker said - sometimes some drivers may open up a little more current with a lower voltage emitter - but nothing drastic.

    Within the same LED series - each level of "improvement" usually only results in ~15-30 more stated lumen output though, which you would truly be hard pressed to see in riding conditions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Megashnauzer View Post
    gotcha. i knew the guy was fos.
    Well, before we go that far, lol, I've never seen the inside of a dinotte 200. There could be some integrated driver/led board like the Quazzle/Lux RC units.

    But - I would assume your friend was meaning to just change the emitter out - which while a new emitter is ~$10, there's just not going to be a night and day difference with swapping to a newer emitter that would work with everything else in your light.

    Now - if you wanted to upgrade to one of the much brighter single emitter led's out there, like the cree XM-L - you'd have to have a driver that supplies at least 2amps to get into the 700+ lumen range, and probably a new optic solution. by the time you've spent all that time and money, you might have been better off with just getting a newer light.

    FYI:
    typically "light engine" is referring to a unit that contains both the driver and led (emitter) onto one unit:
    this is a Lux R/C integrated light engine:


    Or you have a separate driver and emitter:

  10. #10
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    But the Dinotte has a small shaft that runs through the PCB and the LED then sits on this, so a flat light engine like Quazzle's (or any standard board) won't fit.

    Tim

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