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  1. #1
    Bigger is better!
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    Hobbyking LiPoly batteries?

    I see that Hobbyking has quite cheap LiPoly battery packs, but are these any good?
    Any specific recommendations? I guess a high discharge rate is not important for lighting use.

    And maybe more important: Are they protected from over discharge? Of the few I have looked at, I don't see that protection is mentioned…?

  2. #2
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    If you want protected Li-Po's allbatery has quite a few http://www.all-battery.com/111volt-1...ckwithpcb.aspx

  3. #3
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    I have a few electric model airplanes myself. The hobbyking batteries have proven to be very good for such a low price, but it's overkill for LED lighting. They are never protected, since a hard cutoff would result in loss of servo power, and CRASH.

    Cylindrical 18650 Li-ion have a better energy to dollar ratio, so I would go this route for LED's.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by desolder
    I have a few electric model airplanes myself. The hobbyking batteries have proven to be very good for such a low price, but it's overkill for LED lighting. They are never protected, since a hard cutoff would result in loss of servo power, and CRASH.

    Cylindrical 18650 Li-ion have a better energy to dollar ratio, so I would go this route for LED's.
    Hobbyking has 20C and 25C packs too which i think are at a very low price!
    You won'f find a good 18650 cell which is lower in price! (most protected 18650 are from low quality (except the ones from AW), the good ones are unprotected anyway)

    Shure the Hobbyking packs are not protected, but if you have a good driver in your light it will have low voltage protection too - so this shouldn' be a problem (but it can be )

  5. #5
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    I have not used hobby king batteries but I have this charger

    http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s...w/_accessories

    This charger is awesome. It will prolong the life of any battery when properly used. It has every feature I could ever possibly want.

    Another great find from hobby king is this thing: it connects to you balance lead on the battery pack and gives you voltage warnings.

    http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s...ery_Monitor_2S

    With careful handling and some sort of conservative low voltage cut off along with this charger even cheap cells will do quite well. If you use a taskled flex driver you wont need the battery voltage alarm since the flex has programmable low voltage warning and cut off.


    This charger is also great for the money.
    http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s...110/240v_Input

    My next builds will very likley involve there batteries since the only reason i havnt used them before is because i bought a bunch of protected 18650s from DX.
    I remove the crappy protection circuits and use there leads as tabs to build packs with balance charge leads.

    I would like to try one of these next.
    http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s...attery_monitor.

    Only annoying thing about HK is that they send things registered mail and i am never home during the day to sign so I end up having to go and pick up the package at the post office.

  6. #6
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    Also a great part to check your battery pack or balance it while charging (with a non balance charger)
    http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s...edic_System_6S

    I would also recommend this simple charger:
    http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s...0~240v_charger.

  7. #7
    Randomhead
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    I've used lipos without issue. I have some older HK batteries that weren't that great, the new ones would be better. If you use lipos, it seems like the minimum would be to use them with a controller that has voltage protection, otherwise you can easily ruin them. Over-discharge usually causes fires and explosions on the next charge, so your bike wouldn't catch fire, just your house. No biggie, right?

  8. #8
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    I have been running HK Lipo packs for a while for both RC cars and bike lights and haven't had any problems with the packs themselves. I would not recommend trying to change the connectors on the batteries themselves, the wire used has lots of strands and is 8-10 ga. plus you don't want to run the risk of the ends touching.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shift92
    I have been running HK Lipo packs for a while for both RC cars and bike lights and haven't had any problems with the packs themselves. I would not recommend trying to change the connectors on the batteries themselves, the wire used has lots of strands and is 8-10 ga. plus you don't want to run the risk of the ends touching.
    If you know what you are doing and protect the exposed wire, you'll be fine. I change the connections almost every time for my r/c cars.

  10. #10
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    I've been using Lipos for a few months now and under the right circumstances they work great. The biggest drawback to them is they have no protection, physical or electrical.

    I usually run mine in a container of some sort. An old plastic peanut butter jar will work for the smaller ones. BBB makes a water bottle sized tool holder that works great for the big ones (www.BBBparts.com). I found out just week that the plastic tube small swimmers towels come in (http://www.swimoutlet.com/product_p/10240.htm) work really well. They are flat on one side, which makes rigging up a mounting bracket pretty darn simple (I'll post pix later).

    Having some kind of low battery buzzer is a must. I trashed one of my first Lipos because I couldn't believe it had run out of charge already, only to realize later that I had charged a different battery that morning

    I like a bit of foam in my containers to keep the battery from rattling around too much, and soak up a bit of the bumps.

    Mark
    Last edited by mhahn@hvc.rr.com; 08-18-2010 at 06:00 AM.
    Nimium est melior!

  11. #11
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    could this be used with those hobbyking nonprotected lipo batterys ?
    http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXPGN1&P=7
    (there is also 2 and 3 cell version)

  12. #12
    www.hahntronix.com
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    You probably could. I don't know enuff about RC electronics to know where that kind of board would plug in. I like the fact that it gives you a warning before it turns off your battery.

    An alternative is just a simple voltage monitor.

    DX has a cheap voltage monitor: http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.35609

    And I have one from HobbyKing that seems to work pretty well: http://www.hobbycity.com/hobbycity/s...ery_Monitor_3S

    The hobbyking monitor is a bit of a pain to connect to the balancing charger plug, but comes with enuff wire I can route it down the front of my battery setup. It has a blue LED to indicate everything is OK, and it shows up nicely thru the translucent towel container I'm using. It turns red a bit below 3.3 volts per cell, which gives you time to decide if you need to head back to the trailhead or look for that spare battery you hope is in your pack. Around 3 volts per cell it starts to beep, which means you need to change the battery, switch to a backup light, or decide to trash your battery if you still have miles to go back to your car (but you get to decide, not some circuit that just leaves you in the dark).

    The downside to these monitors is they draw 20 milliamps or so whenever they are plugged in, so you have to remember to disconnect them after your ride. I might add a toggle switch to my battery holder to turn the hobyking monitor on/off.

    Mark
    Nimium est melior!

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