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  1. #1
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    HELP - Using a resistor to dim LED driver with 5k pot

    OK, so I have this special N bin MCE on a 20mm star that I really want to use. It's supposed to put out between 490 and 550 lumen at 350mah and can be driven at 700 mah for close to 1000 lumen. Been looking for a driver that would fit into either the easy2led or that cool cheap XML build someone posted up here recently. I saw the wired buckpuck here: 3023-D-N-700 Wired BuckPuck - LED Supply.com that seems to be a great price. However, it needs some sort of pot or resistor to dim or it runs at 700mah and the thing would get too hot. SO, if I wanted to follow the directions below, is there a switch that I could solder resistors to acheive what is said below? I'd probably want an "off", 67% and 100% setting.



    The standard part number (3023-d-e-700) requires a 5k pot to dim, if you donít connect anything it works at 100%, so basically the same as the non dim version, the part number with the 'P' suffix already has a small pot fitted.

    If you touch the two dim wires together (with a switch or by other means) it will turn the driver off, it will still draw a very small amount of power from the battery though. You can also use various combinations, for example.

    If you got the dimmable driver and wanted to set the output at say 50%,but didnít want the pot, you could use a set value resistor so that the LED is always at that 50% level, you could use a 3 position switch, and have the wires short on 1 position to turn off the LEDs, have a set value resistor for a low beam option on the 2nd, and have the wires open on the 3rd for full power.
    "It looks flexy"

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by gticlay View Post
    If you got the dimmable driver and wanted to set the output at say 50%,but didnít want the pot, you could use a set value resistor so that the LED is always at that 50% level, you could use a 3 position switch, and have the wires short on 1 position to turn off the LEDs, have a set value resistor for a low beam option on the 2nd, and have the wires open on the 3rd for full power.
    It can done like you are thinking. I have done this on my micro lights that have the driver with the battery.

    I did one of them with a wired remote and it caused a bit of a problem. The remote had a bit under 3 feet of 28AWG wire and a 3 position Judco switch. Between the switch and the cable length there is enough resistance that the puck drives a bit of current though the LED stays off. This drains the battery in storage. Have to remember to disconnect the battery.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vancbiker View Post
    It can done like you are thinking. I have done this on my micro lights that have the driver with the battery.

    I did one of them with a wired remote and it caused a bit of a problem. The remote had a bit under 3 feet of 28AWG wire and a 3 position Judco switch. Between the switch and the cable length there is enough resistance that the puck drives a bit of current though the LED stays off. This drains the battery in storage. Have to remember to disconnect the battery.
    That sounds good (and thanks), just was hoping someone would say, "here is the switch and use these resistors to accomplish this" since I don't really know what to do.
    "It looks flexy"

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by gticlay View Post
    That sounds good (and thanks), just was hoping someone would say, "here is the switch and use these resistors to accomplish this" since I don't really know what to do.
    I used a Judco SPDT switch from Digikey 543PB-ND and a 470 ohm resistor. This setup cycles through off, high, low, off, high, low,......
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails HELP - Using a resistor to dim LED driver with 5k pot-puck.jpg  


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