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  1. #1
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    Groovy Baby Thanks Odtexas

    Having watched Odtexas for an age doing his bit with the table saw but having a lathe and manual milling machine I never really thought about the ease of using a table saw if a tad on the dangerous side maybe .

    and not wanting to be a copycat of his cases carried on standing at the mill for hours cutting grooves in solid billet .

    so when the offer of this cheap table saw came along £10 but it had no blade I paid the guy and brought it home fully convinced it would be a duff one but a fuse replacement and £25 for a nice new blade saw me with a working finger removing tool




    the easy way would be to make a rip quide and groove some stock just like OT`s
    so started thinking I wanted grooves around the square and in a repeatable fashion
    so here is my method for doing a few cheap housings quickly .

    so got me some offcuts of plywood and started playing around first up cut a couple of strips to fit in the 2 grooves in the table and bond them to a flat lump of ply .



    put it on the table and cut a slot for the blade .

    and now on the top a couple of lumps of straight timber with some 3 mm holes drilled through for some pegs which are the pins from pop rivets
    drilled at 5 mm centres



    set the blade to the required depth of cut and voila nice grooved cases .


  2. #2
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    I am just happy to be a bad influence around here.
    I have been hoping someone here would just cut alot of light bodies like mine and put them up for sale.
    So feel free to copy/modify any of the lights that I have made.
    I know I have learned alot from you and incorporated some of your ideas in my lights over the years.
    The table saw can quickly cut alot of lights and a jig will make them uniform, if not alot safer.
    That round light I made last week was also made on the table saw. Your jig might be able to do a round body fairly easily.
    I just hold the round stock down on the center of the blade and slowly rotate the stock grooving it all the way around. Not better than a lathe, but I bet its alot faster.....
    Have fun and looking forward to what you come up with.

  3. #3
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    That's ingenious Chris!
    Do you figure it's better to cut more grooves around the case and get possibly more area, rather than go lenghtways and get some airflow in those grooves? Or is it just that it's easier to work with that stock turned sideways?

    BTW, sent you an email back.

    Arek

  4. #4
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    you truly are an Englishman in his Shed troutie, I take my hat off to you!

  5. #5
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    Nice adaptation, Chris. For me, a bit safer, I think.

    Seems like you can do fins arround all sides with the tube stock in this orientation if they are across the air flow or on two or three sides and cut holes for reginas or lenses of your choice ande connectors (2 sides of fins) if you like your fins in the direction of airflow. A light's length piece to cut four sides the other way would be bit trickier but the stops to get spacing would help a lot.

    So far, Marwi housings are doing it for me (cheap!), but if the Iris without the holder had not fit, I was trying this first, then the layer method. Nice to have a doable alternative.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arek
    That's ingenious Chris!
    Do you figure it's better to cut more grooves around the case and get possibly more area, rather than go lenghtways and get some airflow in those grooves? Or is it just that it's easier to work with that stock turned sideways?

    BTW, sent you an email back.

    Arek

    You have it correct 2 reasons one was that Odtexas does lengthways fins and I wanted it to be different I guess
    and you cant have enough surface if you want to go to 3 amps

    MM that a big email

    just run a couple off to see how quick Bit noisy though .




    Cheers
    Matt I just like tinkering in the man cave

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  8. #8
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    Great little jig idea there Trout!!!!
    Looking good.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  9. #9
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    Troutie,
    That is a very clever idea/jig. I have learned lots from you and others on this forum. Thanks for sharing.

  10. #10
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    Here is a little video of it in action

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yta-UnWGYQ

    I am dead pleased how easy it works

  11. #11
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    Wow, how cool is that! It makes me want reconsider which direction my fins run. The general opinion seems to be it doesn't matter as when the light is moving it will cool fine and when not moving, all that matters is surface area. Correct?

  12. #12
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    [QUOTE]finger removing tool......lol
    great vid there troutie!!....and that jig is ingenious!!
    ...Scun.thorpe, UK

  13. #13
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    Troutie, new cases look really cool! even without the ano.

  14. #14
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    Nice job Chris
    Cool video!

  15. #15
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    Cheers guys it real satisfying when a project works well

    had a work out and the little case goes from 8 square inches to 12.72 square inches of surface

  16. #16
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    Thanks Chris.

    I can't tell you how many times I have pondered over how to make a jig to do my compound saw cuts a little more uniformly and that is just so brilliant.

    Previously I have been coating the stock with marking pen then scratching visible lines into the marking pen at the required spacings, and cutting freehand. Needless to say it's never very accurate.

    I'll be keeping the compound saw, I like my fingers where they are, but it'll soon be getting a jig

  17. #17
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    The jig was a really good idea. Suddenly is not as scary as that

    What thickness is that tube and how deep are the groves?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bravellir
    The jig was a really good idea. Suddenly is not as scary as that

    What thickness is that tube and how deep are the groves?

    the tube is 1 inch square or 1 inch by 2 inch the wall thickness is swg 10 or 3.25 mm


    the grooves are nominally 2 mm deep

    on a finger removal basis I did try 30 years ago with a power saw to remove my thumb
    so using these now always give me the shivers when I get close to a spinning blade
    lots of stitches and still no feeling in it 30 years later


  19. #19
    A waste of time it is is
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    I'd blame the loss of feeling on that "glass almost empty" sitting on the corner of the table.

  20. #20
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    +1 Great video of the jig in action, Chis!

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy13
    Wow, how cool is that! It makes me want reconsider which direction my fins run. The general opinion seems to be it doesn't matter as when the light is moving it will cool fine and when not moving, all that matters is surface area. Correct?
    Both directions of fins are supposedly the same or very close in a post of a thread here somewhere that I once read digging for cooling information. You need deep narrow valleys beween fins and low airspeeds to get an difference. We use shallow wide valleys and try not to go too slow.

    So that means it's more a matter what you like the looks of and have the time and patience to make.

  21. #21
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    Troutie, it has to be said that the jig is groovy and looks very accurate too.

    But please mind those pinkies ( I've been there)

  22. #22
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    Ideas such as this are why you are such a stud! I tried the table saw groove cutting trick but I couldn't reproduce the eye pleasing work of Odtexas. Grooves weren't completely square or even (which drives an anal person like me over the edge.) I can do this.
    One quick question-Do you know how wide your blade is? When I watched the video of your jig, the grooves looked wider than mine, which I liked. My fingers would be safer with one pass per groove versus several!
    Once again,thanks for sharing!

  23. #23
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    he he he, mancave indeed. Looks like there's a beer fridge in there, unless you're a true Yorkshireman that puts his bitter in the oven to warm it up in winter

    Just watched the video. I always say it's the mark of something/ -one very clever that makes a difficult process look so simple. I'll have the wife keep an eye on freecycle for table saws...

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by yetibetty
    Troutie, it has to be said that the jig is groovy and looks very accurate too.

    But please mind those pinkies ( I've been there)


    All the finger warnings are taken very seriously ( thanks ) if you notice the blade is covered for all the time it is not cutting the ali .
    and I have put simple stops on the board which over hang the table so forward and back motion is limited to the cutting and parked positions .



    Dr Mushy
    the grooves are a cock hair under 3 mm wide and as you can see not square at the bottom as a slight pyramid is formed by the tooth offset on the blade


    Now where are those Lflex`s mr postman

    so now we have square bottomed fins round bottomed fins and egyptian fins

  25. #25
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    Ah, english people are still so exotic...

    nice jig !

    A very clever invention here ; take a look at their video films !

    I wish you all secular fingers.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by TTGV
    Ah, english people are still so exotic...

    nice jig !

    A very clever invention here ; take a look at their video films !

    I wish you all secular fingers.
    Doesn't work when cutting aluminium though!

  27. #27
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    Trout,
    I've always liked round bottom fins, but Egyptian fins are looking pretty good.
    I think I'm gonna have to get my hands on a table saw.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  28. #28
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    I raise my bobblehat on seeing a master innovator at work! Great vid!

    You could even leave a flat on part of the bottom for boring/threading a mounting hole using this method! Or even on part of the top for a switch ..... etc etc. Genius, Chris!

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrLee
    Doesn't work when cutting aluminium though!
    As it comes, you're right !
    A pair of non-conductive gloves and a insulating table cover may not be enought. ...

  30. #30
    Ola
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    Nice solution but I would prefer a "standard" type of homemade box joint jig for speed and accuracy. Just have a piece same thickness as the cuts, mounted on the crosscut jig. No need to cut a lot of accurate holes and no need to pull out each nail after each cut...and no risk the nail holes will become loose over time. Something similar to this is what I use for woodworking.

    http://www.woodworkforums.com/attach...able-saw-2.jpg

    Edit. picture might need explonation. After first cut, part is lifted and moved so first cut fits over brown part (which have same thickness as cut). Second cut is done and the procedure repeated for remaining cuts.
    Last edited by Ola; 02-26-2011 at 03:13 PM.

  31. #31
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    another good idea for a simple jig, nice work Ola

  32. #32
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    Yes another way to skin a rabbit Ola. thanks.


    having a think and the pin method gives me more flexibility than the slot method you picture
    without needing multple jigs .
    Last edited by troutie-mtb; 02-26-2011 at 11:50 PM.

  33. #33
    Ola
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    Agree, after sleeping on the ideas... your method most likely faster for 4-sided cuts. Also you can skip one cut on one side if you want a flat surface for switch etc. Not possible with my jig.

  34. #34
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    http://cgi.ebay.com/8020-Inc-Aluminu...item4cf4f3e89e

    this would make for a perfect xml/lflex housing , if only they shipped to Portugal...

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    This is 1" OD, and wall thickness is .125" so the inner is 19x19mm. You could fit the lflex in diagonally and trim down 20mm star or even use 14mm, but what optics to use that would fit in with no machining?

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toaster79
    This is 1" OD, and wall thickness is .125" so the inner is 19x19mm. You could fit the lflex in diagonally and trim down 20mm star or even use 14mm, but what optics to use that would fit in with no machining?

    Regina fits like a glove

    Lflex will go in flat with .5 mm filed off each side looking at the pics there is some spare meat that can be lost should be able to see a real one soon I hope


    or the square Ledils and a bit of filing / dremeling or for the lucky ones milling .

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by bravellir


    http://cgi.ebay.com/8020-Inc-Aluminu...item4cf4f3e89e

    this would make for a perfect xml/lflex housing , if only they shipped to Portugal...

    I have some tubing similar to that. Recently been toying around with how I was gonna use it.
    I think I know now.......= )
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toaster79
    This is 1" OD, and wall thickness is .125" so the inner is 19x19mm. You could fit the lflex in diagonally and trim down 20mm star or even use 14mm, but what optics to use that would fit in with no machining?

    it would require some sanding

  39. #39
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    Here it is the first light off the groovy jig .






    I did want to put an LFlex in but they have`nt arrived yet so it got a H6flex .


    Real easy build what with the thermal tape for the H6Flex so no mounting problems
    and I have got to mention the Serious Glue again the more I use it the more impressed I am with it .

    crystal clear and easy to apply for the nano gluing again pioneered by Odtexas
    and pretty tough stuff .

  40. #40
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    mmmmmm nuclear brown!! ...
    ..thats a crackin wee light troutie!,
    how hard can you push it without it getting too hot? 2Amps ?
    ...Scun.thorpe, UK

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by HEY HEY ITS HENDO
    mmmmmm nuclear brown!! ...
    ..thats a crackin wee light troutie!,
    how hard can you push it without it getting too hot? 2Amps ?

    Ha well spotted there Hendo

    its only done a dog walk tonight and is set up for the full monty 3 amps .
    been running its non finned brother for a couple of weeks on my helmet
    and it did an hour at dog trotting speed without tripping gets warm though

    so reckon the finned version will cope fine .

  42. #42
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    I must admit I am really impressed with the result Chris. Great looking light. The table saw makes the mill look slow in comparison.

    As a side note, is that some more tallies of beer to the right of your bike in the photo left outside to chill in the English winter.
    Last edited by brad72; 02-27-2011 at 07:25 PM.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by brad72
    As a side note, is that some more tallies of bee r to the right of your bike in the photo left outside to chill in the English winter.
    Check Hendos reference to "nuclear brown" a few posts back. Newcastle Brown Ale.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by troutie-mtb
    nano gluing again pioneered by Odtexas
    What is nano gluing? I tried to search for "nano" but did not find the description of the technique.

    Arne

  45. #45
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    I use 2 part 5 minute epoxy. Troutie is using Serious Glue.

    Basically we are using a thin consistency glue/epoxy and working it around the polycarb-light body junction. The glue/epoxy is thin enough to be drawn into the junction. Makes for a great seal and dries clear.
    Issue is you have to work about the amount you see there into the junction. So one small toothpick "nano" glob at a time all the way around the entire polycarb cover.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by arnea
    What is nano gluing? I tried to search for "nano" but did not find the description of the technique.

    Arne

    as OT discribed. only more like using sillycone in my case. the stuff is more like a gel
    and the tube has a nice rounded nozzle which is perfect for running a bead around a facia

    still flexible. but more solid than silicon.

  47. #47
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    troutie, can you please post a macro shot of the junction?

  48. #48
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    Great jig troutie, and good video of it in action. Hats off to you!

  49. #49
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    Thank you odtexas and troutie, that explained it.

    Arne

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by bravellir
    troutie, can you please post a macro shot of the junction?

    I am assuming you mean the glue joint .

    bit difficult taking a good pic of something that is nearly invisible
    but here goes


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