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  1. #1
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    Achesalot ripoff/mod w/3*Q5 Leds

    Hi all,

    Just finished my new light. Basically, I used the square tube design by Achesalot but since I found that the metal-epoxy was not strong enough I used a gas-burner-aluminium-solder-design. So now it is "one" aluminium housing. One end of the back "housing" I left open for stuffing things inside and then used an end plug with the cable and waterproof switch attached. The lenses and plug are sealed with silicone.
    The battery is four 18650 2600 mAh Tenergys with a PCB and a balancer cable attached. Battery is weather-proofed with vulcanizing rubber band with some MTB tube on top. Connectors are standard DC round-pin.
    Lenses are from LEDIL and Leds are Cree Q5's. Driver is bFlex.

    Whole assembly inc batt is 348 g.

    Tested it yesterday, beam is a little too much on the spot side, I am currently building one more for the handlebar, will add some width to the beam and some more light just in front of the wheel.

    Best regards, Morten
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  2. #2
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
    Reputation: crisillo's Avatar
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    looks nice!

  3. #3
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    Which LEDIL optics did you use? I have found that anything tighter than the CRS-D is useless.

    BTW, looks good! How difficult is it to work (sanding, grinding, polishing, etc.) the solder?

  4. #4
    Devolution is real!
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    Looks awesome. Explain about this alum. solder.

  5. #5
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    same question here. i'm about to place an order for some ledil lenses and would like to know what works and what is just to narrow to be useful on a trail. nice light!

  6. #6
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    on my light for the helmet I am running two smooth spots at 7deg and one medium at 14deg. I really like this set up, lots of throw and still lots of light right in front. for my bar light I have one medium-14deg, one diffuser-7deg, and one oval- 6x24deg. it works pretty good but the helmet light just kills it. with both of them on all the bar light does is make the first 5-10 in front really bright, other than that the helmet drowns it out. the way I run them is I use the bar for climbing, the helmet for average pace on single track and both for screaming fast downhills.
    It's go time

  7. #7
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    Hi Guys

    First the lenses: As hizzity, I use two 7 degree spots (CRS-SS) and one medium 14 degrees (CRS-M). Alone, this setup is too narrow for my taste when on the track, which is why I am building one for the bar also with wider lenses.

    Then the solder: You use a gas blow-torch to heat the aluminium, it requires the metal to be above 400 degrees C since it is the metal that has to melt the solder material - NOT the flame. It is SUPER strong - I put two soldered pieces in a vice and smashed them with a hammer - the pieces were totally destroyed but the solder stayed solid! It requires a little practice but wokrs great. It is a little diffrerent to wotk on than aluminium, feels a little harder, but you use the same tools (file, beltsander, sandpaper whatever). Check out the website for more info, also with video (if it does not work, ask, I have other links). http://www.easyweld.com/

    Best regards, Morten

  8. #8
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    Nice job!
    I tried some of the Durafix Easyweld once, and it definitely takes some practice to get good at it. It's pretty easy on the 1/16" aluminum, but also easy to ruin a part by overheating. It's also easy to melt one piece loose while you are working on the other side, for instance. Looks like MoMaTo has mastered the stuff though

    I've never actually had the JB Weld come loose on a light except when I was sanding a piece with the belt sander, causing the metal to get real hot. The JB will definitely let go when heated enough, otherwise if you clean and sand the parts to be joined, it will hold.

  9. #9
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    Ok i know this thread is real old but I haven't found any other instances of some one successfully using aluminum solder/brazing stuff.
    What is the trick to this stuff? I have been experimenting with a product called Lumiweld that looks the same. The procedure in the instructions is identical to durafix. I have a lot of experience welding, soldering and brazing but I just cant get this stuff to work right. I heat one of the work pieces and scour it with a stainless brush and then tin it, making sure the the aluminum is melting the rod not the torch flame. It tins ok and leaves a thin shiny layer. I do the same to the other piece and then I place them so the tinned materiel is touching and try to heat them and get the puddles to run togeather. It goes from being shiny and smooth to looking rough and dull gray. The pices do not stick togeather.

    I have also tried placing the work pieces together and heating and trying to get the puddle on the very small gap. Same result.

    I have also tried the above procedure of tinning and then placing the pieces together and trying to add more material at the same time i try to get the puddles from the tinning to run together.

    Maybe my lumiweld stuff is junk and I need to use durafix or HS2000 or some other similar product. I even tried a new SS brush. I also tried an acetylene torch with neutral, and carbarizing flame in case my little propane torch had an oxidizing flame.
    Unless some one has some solid advise I am giving up and using thermal epoxy.

  10. #10
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    Hi Jay

    It is not easy. My biggest problem is getting the object(s) hot enough - I have a cheap torch from a tool shop, and the flame is not very hot. I cannot put the object in a vice, because it acts as a big heat sink.... Also, bigger, more solid objects (fx a large piece of 1" tube) is harder, I think due to heatsinking also. When not hot enough, it turns grey as you mention.

    I normally file a v-gap in the two parts that need welding and then place them in position and use the SS brush. Then I heat both parts and apply the rod when it is hot enough - sometimes I need to use the SS brush in the hot weld to get it to stick properly. But afterwards I just apply the needed amount of rod material while "stirring" the melting pool with the rod. There are videos of the process on the Durafix website.

    I had quite some problems with the four parts that made these lights, since parts kept melting off while I was attaching other parts :-)

    But it turned out fine, polishes up real nice.

    Hope it helps :-)

  11. #11
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    The process as MoMaTo explains it sounds really similar to O/A torch welding... Of course, I've got a coworker who can do wonders with a TIG welder, so I'll be employing his services when I build my achesalot style taillight. Still need a driver for it, though.

  12. #12
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    I've tried it as well. It is difficult to get the temperature just right. Also, if you've successfully welded two pieces together and you're trying to add a third, it is easy to get the pieces hot enough to melt the first weld unless you heatsink them at the right place. I imagine that after wasting 10 sticks of the stuff you will start to get the hang of it. The guy in the durafix video makes it look so easy!

  13. #13
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    Yes he does :-) I think a really hot flame (fx acetylene torch) makes it easier to quickly heat the desired spot only. In my experience, it is good for adddíng a few pieces together, but for more complex builds I will look for other solutions. Adding small pieces, like an endcap for a piece of tubing is nearly impossible because you cannot hold on to it without heatsinking it too much - and it need to be fixed so you can work the wire brush and the welding rod.

    My achesalot lights actually turned out really nice after a alot of practice, and it polishes beautifully :-)

  14. #14
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    Allen- It's good to see you around again, it's been a while. While your around I'd like to thank you for all of your time and effort that you put into this DIY thing. I'm running 2 of you lights on the bars and one on my helmet. I can easily wash out the next guys lights in front of me or provide enough light for the the poor fellow who only has a helmet light. It's a great design that's easy to put together with fantastic results.

    Cheers!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by achesalot
    ... The guy in the durafix video makes it look so easy! ...
    Yes, it looks like he's had a lot of practice! Once upon a time, I used to be OK with an oxy-welder, but I found the hard way that oxy-welding aluminium is just like trying to nail jelly to the ceiling! It's doable, but only with lots of practice (and patience).

    Brazing on the other hand, works at a lower temperature than welding. Brazing still takes some skill, but it's somewhat easier than oxy-welding, especially on aluminium or cast-iron. Based on what I've read, that Durafix solder looks exactly like a form of aluminium brazing to me. If so, then an oxy flame would be perfect for getting the heat into the workpiece, but of course you're not using the hottest part of the flame 'cos it'd just melt the aluminum instantly. Look like an interesting technique tho', and I'd like to try it.
    Brisbane, AU

  16. #16
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    MaMoTo - Nice light! A couple if questions if you don't mind:

    In photo #2 it looks you used a plastic end cap in the 1" alu tubing.....where did you find that? I'm going to try a pair of square-tube versions of the DIY Dinotte, and that looks like the perfect solution to the end cap dilemma.

    What optics are you thinking to broaden the beam? Sounds like the 7/14/7 was too tight. I was thinking 9/14/9 or 14/9/14. Mine will be on the bars, so I want more spill. Where are you buying your optics?

    Thanks

    JZ
    It's not about speed, it's about lack of control.

  17. #17
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    Hey Jim.

    Thanks ;-) The endcap is a cap used as feet in racks etc made of 1" tubing. It looks like the picture below. This is nice, because you cannot alu-weld the endcap with all the electronics inside. This one just pops in. I sealed it with some silicone.

    I am keeping those optics for my helmet light, my bar light has two spots (or diffusers maybe, don't remember) and one oval (CRS-O) which gives nice wide light in just front of the bike.


  18. #18
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    Oh, now I see where my idea came from! Thanks Momato.
    Also good for the back end of square dinotte style lights like this one I built a few months ago.
    I'll do an MC-E when I find a suitable optic.
    DIY LED Bike Lights:
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  19. #19
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    That is excatly what I wanna do :-) I think that will make an excellent helmet light. But what shall we do for thermal management of the MC-E? Glue som fins to it? Or do you think it will not be necessary? I find that air movement is very good at keeping my triples completely cold.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoMaTo
    That is excatly what I wanna do :-) I think that will make an excellent helmet light. But what shall we do for thermal management of the MC-E? Glue som fins to it? Or do you think it will not be necessary? I find that air movement is very good at keeping my triples completely cold.
    The plan was to use these heatsinks inside and a scoop on the top. Leave the back open and driver is remote.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoMaTo
    Hey Jim.

    Thanks ;-) The endcap is a cap used as feet in racks etc made of 1" tubing. It looks like the picture below. This is nice, because you cannot alu-weld the endcap with all the electronics inside. This one just pops in. I sealed it with some silicone.

    I am keeping those optics for my helmet light, my bar light has two spots (or diffusers maybe, don't remember) and one oval (CRS-O) which gives nice wide light in just front of the bike.

    where do you get those?

  22. #22
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    Well, I get them at work. But you can get them where they sell the 1" aluminium tubing that is used for building tables, shelfs etc. I think your local hardware store would be the best bet.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by znomit
    The plan was to use these heatsinks inside and a scoop on the top. Leave the back open and driver is remote.
    Yes, I also thougt about fitting the LED directly to a heat sink and then just have square tubing for the optic. With a small inline casing for a bFlex and switch, it would make a nice, small light. I think I will go computer heatsink scavenging

    I think something like this would be better - more surface area, and found in many computers. could easily be fitted to the 1" tubing:

  24. #24
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    This is almost exactly the design I have been thinking of. I want to use 1/2" square tubing with a 10mmx10mm inside size. Just glue three pieces of the tubing together side by side and sand the ends flat and then glue on a cut to size computer heat sink. 10mm round Cree XP-E Q5s are now in at cutter, as well as a bunch of Carclo 10mm square optics. I keep hoping one of my co workers will commission me to build it. I still cant imagine a better helmet light than an achesalot triple in 1/2" tubing. Maybe round 9-11mm optics for the XP-E will come out and I can just special order a 10mm drill bit and bore out some 1/2" square bar stock with the drill press. I even have the 1/2" solid square bar stock and part of a heatsink from a graphics accelerator card. Its a top notch heat sink each little fin has tiny grooves on it and the whole thing is anodized black.

  25. #25
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    That sounds nice and small. What is the difference between XR-E and XP-E - only size?

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