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  1. #1
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    2011 Collection 35mm ID Chassis

    "In Ano"
    Body Tube
    ~35mm inside diameter.

    Slug for ~35mm inside diameter light.

    Slug needs to be sanded lightly to fit inside tube.

    34.8mm glass for ~35mm inside diameter light (Thanks Hoffman Amps)
    On off Switch
    Using Tamiya mini connectors with heat shrink covers.












    Tube is ripped along fence to flatten one side.


    Move fence and rip other side.

    At this point it is best to section the tube (cross cut) into whatever length you want to final light to be.
    Then carefully slot finning on each individual body. Was trying to fin whole tube, but found that even minor rotation screws up symmetry over a two foot long cut.
    Notice asymmetric finning on light bodies.

    Cheap Kaidomain driver.
    Operates around 2.4 Amps.


    Removing the R400 sense resistor from the R1 slot reduces current to 1.88 Amps with the MC-E M-bin parallel wired star.


    6xAA battery holder with Tamiya mini connectors.


  2. #2
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    that's tidy, I didn't even notice the asymmetric slots until you pointed it out! I'm idly toying with the idea of an MC-E bar light and it's great to get so many different ideas on how to do it

  3. #3
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    OOh Scary use of a table saw
    But a nice end result

    I am sure you are not taking risks but I am very wary of stuff like this as have had to have the tips of my fingers and side of my thumb stiched back together after a power saw misuse Take care OT

    But very creative

  4. #4
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    Very nice od! Everytime I see your lights it pushes me a bit closer to try anodizing.

    How do you attach and seal the glass? Is that a Fraen medium reflector with the large facets?

  5. #5
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    Nice anodizing...
    Id like to try it myself, but I'm not sure the miss's will like me having a pot of hydrochloric acid in the house..
    And lie Chris said, Scary use of a table saw.
    Could you not use a large G clamp to hold the pipe and pass it through the saw? At least it will create some distance between the blade and your fingers.
    Plus you get a handle..

  6. #6
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    Thanks as always guys.

    Thought about using clamps or even screwing the aluminum stock to some 2 inch wide scrap wood. In the end though I just wear my heavy welding gloves, goggles, and chainsaw helmet with the wire mesh face guard, and hope for the best.
    Did have the finger tip on a welding glove cut off one time. Just took a nasty whack to the actual finger, but didn't cut it. The glove was a complete loss though.
    I hurt myself on a more regular basis while riding believe it or not. Time with the table saw is safer than saddle time.

    I went to a farm supply store and purchased some small syringes. Use the syriges to place a really small bead of silicone on the lip of the Fraens and then set the glass cover in place. Looks really pro when done.
    Using Fraen Medium and Narrows. Medium is great even fill. No throw at all of course. That's the point of using the narrow. It is almost all throw, so nice complimentary pairing.

    Ano isn't as bad as it sounds. The sulphur fumes are the worst part. That and any tools in the area start to rust/oxidize quickly from those same fumes.

    "Creative" is a nice way of describing not having proper tools like a mill. Thanks.
    Take a peak at this "creative" failure. I could make it work, but need more tube stock, and time..............


  7. #7
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    Was trying to fin whole tube, but found that even minor rotation screws up symmetry over a two foot long cut
    Every time I tried to do such a thing I screwd one-two fins. Absolutely no successful parts were done. Then I gave up and bought some manual mill

    Your skills with the table saw are incredible!

    Lights look very professional

  8. #8
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    Nice job odtexas. I enjoy seeing imaginative solutions like this.

    Right, off to the garage to have a go at carving a block if ali with a chainsaw...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by JezV
    Nice job odtexas. I enjoy seeing imaginative solutions like this.

    Right, off to the garage to have a go at carving a block if ali with a chainsaw...
    Have you tried a hammer?

  10. #10
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    Ot, you are "again" encouraging me to risk life and limb. I wear a face shield when destroying aluminum parts with the table saw. I still have a few shavings imbeded in my chest. lol I like that round light. Have you tried the MCE "n" yet?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by JezV
    Nice job odtexas. I enjoy seeing imaginative solutions like this.

    Right, off to the garage to have a go at carving a block if ali with a chainsaw...
    Chainsaw is one of my favorite tools after the tablesaw.
    Haven't attacked any aluminum with one yet so have at and let me know how it goes.
    Someone has to push the envelope and I am running out things to cut up around here.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldMTBfreak
    Ot, you are "again" encouraging me to risk life and limb. I wear a face shield when destroying aluminum parts with the table saw. I still have a few shavings imbeded in my chest. lol I like that round light. Have you tried the MCE "n" yet?
    The cutter shipment just got here, but holidays and family is keeping me out of the garage.
    I run either 2.4 amps or 1.88 amps on the lights.
    They could handle alot more juice though with the amount of heat sinking available. Maybe I need to email George,get H6CC, and push the MC-E N to 3+ amps.
    Good luck with the saw and chips.
    Pain is price of progress it seems...

  13. #13
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    holy smokes!

    Nice looking lights OD but the table saw deal scares the crap out of me.

  14. #14
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    odtexas,

    Nice looking lights. I made a few similar lights, but without the table saw ribs.



    Don't want to besmirch your efforts but a few observations:

    1 - The driver you are using uses the same driver chip the MS Bastid does. It could benefit from a couple improvements:

    The resistors labeled R100 and R40 are 0805 packages on a board that will accept 1206 parts. Do yourself a favor and get the larger parts, they dissipate heat better. You can use two 0.15 ohm resistors instead or even three 0.25 ohm ones (two on the bottom, the third stacked on top).

    You can raise the allowed input voltage by replacing the input caps with something rated for 16 to 25 volts in the same size package. I'd look for a 10uF part for the large cap and a .1uF cap for the small one. The driver can handle up to 18 volts I think.

    Put in a beefier diode. A 4 amp 30V one will last a longer than the 2 amp one the board comes with.

    2 - if you can find 35mm plexiglass (or acrylic) discs, you can glue them to the fraen reflectors with the right of plastic cement. I find multipurpose plumbers cement for plastic pipes works pretty well. not quite as messy as silicone, and some types of RTV silicone can be corrosive. www.bigbluesaw.com is a nice place to get custom pieces of plastic cut at reasonable prices (if you order 50 or so).

    3 - Not sure how you attach the reflector. I wound up attaching the reflector/cover assembly to the tubing by pouring epoxy down the tube from the back, makes for a very waterproof front. The tricky part then is getting the LED placed on your aluminum slug so that it lines up with the reflector.

    4. I used a tubing endcap and drilled holes for the switch and power wires.



    The hole in the bottom is a rivet nut and is used to attach the light to it's mount.

    5. You can buy pre-anodized aluminum tubing with a 1.375 inner diameter from places like McMaster-Carr for $22 for 6 feet. Don't get me wrong, you anodizing looks pretty cool, but I didn't want a bunch of sulfur fumes in my garage.

    6. The ribbing is not really needed if you keep moving.I believe your driver has only has one light level, so the ribbing will help dissipate heat from the LED, but I suspect if you still for very long your light gets pretty hot.

    Mark

    PS: Where the heck are you getting the Fraen reflectors, most US distributors seem to have dropped them? I still have a box of 50 or so of the narrow laying about someplace, PM me if you need more.
    Last edited by mhahn@hvc.rr.com; 11-27-2010 at 07:44 AM.
    Nimium est melior!

  15. #15
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    That's really cool. I didn't check, but part numbers/build pics would be very cool for those of us that would like to try that out. Have any "mounted" pics to show?

    Quote Originally Posted by mhahn@hvc.rr.com
    odtexas,

    Nice looking lights. I made a few similar lights, but without the table saw ribs.



    Don't want to besmirch your efforts but a few observations:

    1 - The driver you are using uses the same driver chip the MS Bastid does. It could benefit from a couple improvements:

    The resistors labeled R100 and R40 are 0805 packages on a board that will accept 1206 parts. Do yourself a favor and get the larger parts, they dissipate heat better. You can use two 0.15 ohm resistors instead or even three 0.25 ohm ones (two on the bottom, the third stacked on top).

    You can raise the allowed input voltage by replacing the input caps with something rated for 16 to 25 volts in the same size package. I'd look for a 10uF part for the large cap and a .1uF cap for the small one. The driver can handle up to 18 volts I think.

    Put in a beefier diode. A 4 amp 30V one will last a longer than the 2 amp one the board comes with.

    2 - if you can find 35mm plexiglass (or acrylic) discs, you can glue them to the fraen reflectors with the right of plastic cement. I find multipurpose plumbers cement for plastic pipes works pretty well. not quite as messy as silicone, and some types of RTV silicone can be corrosive. www.bigbluesaw.com is a nice place to get custom pieces of plastic cut at reasonable prices (if you order 50 or so).

    3 - Not sure how you attach the reflector. I wound up attaching the reflector/cover assembly to the tubing by pouring epoxy down the tube from the back, makes for a very waterproof front. The tricky part then is getting the LED placed on your aluminum slug so that it lines up with the reflector.

    4. I used a tubing endcap and drilled holes for the switch and power wires.



    The hole in the bottom is a rivet nut and is used to attach the light to it's mount.

    5. You can buy pre-anodized aluminum tubing with a 1.375 inner diameter from places like McMaster-Carr for $22 for 6 feet. Don't get me wrong, you anodizing looks pretty cool, but I didn't want a bunch of sulfur fumes in my garage.

    6. The ribbing is not really needed if you keep moving.I believe your driver has only has one light level, so the ribbing will help dissipate heat from the LED, but I suspect if you still for very long your light gets pretty hot.

    Mark

    PS: Where the heck are you getting the Fraen reflectors, most US distributors seem to have dropped them? I still have a box of 50 or so of the narrow laying about someplace, PM me if you need more.
    "It looks flexy"

  16. #16
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    Funny you should mention the driver. I would love some help/advice in that area especially. Looks like gticlay needs that same help.
    The following is from the Deal Extreme website as an eval. of this driver.
    Posted by siberianbat on 11/1/2010

    Pros: Simply schematics and simply adjustment.
    Can work up to 16V, but You must re-solder C1 capacitor (look main picture) to 10mF x 16V
    You can adjust the current with a resistor near to C1 (marked R10 = 0,1 Ohm on picture)
    to get more current set lower resistance, to set lower current - resolder this resistor with more Ohms))
    Cons: If You wish to get more current,- You MUST to resolder Schottky (D1) with true 3A Schottky diode.

    Then from you
    1 - The driver you are using uses the same driver chip the MS Bastid does. It could benefit from a couple improvements:

    The resistors labeled R100 and R40 are 0805 packages on a board that will accept 1206 parts. Do yourself a favor and get the larger parts, they dissipate heat better. You can use two 0.15 ohm resistors instead or even three 0.25 ohm ones (two on the bottom, the third stacked on top).

    You can raise the allowed input voltage by replacing the input caps with something rated for 16 to 25 volts in the same size package. I'd look for a 10uF part for the large cap and a .1uF cap for the small one. The driver can handle up to 18 volts I think.

    Put in a beefier diode. A 4 amp 30V one will last a longer than the 2 amp one the board comes with.

    Links man, links.
    This part of building is out of my area of experience and I have been having trouble finding appropriate sense resistors. Never heard of 0805 packages before or 1206 parts.
    Wouldn't mind rebuilding these a little beefier and I would also like to push them to 3 amps like the eval from DX describes.

  17. #17
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    2 - if you can find 35mm plexiglass (or acrylic) discs, you can glue them to the fraen reflectors with the right of plastic cement. I find multipurpose plumbers cement for plastic pipes works pretty well. not quite as messy as silicone, and some types of RTV silicone can be corrosive. www.bigbluesaw.com is a nice place to get custom pieces of plastic cut at reasonable prices (if you order 50 or so).
    Nice to know....... Thanks again.

    3 - Not sure how you attach the reflector. I wound up attaching the reflector/cover assembly to the tubing by pouring epoxy down the tube from the back, makes for a very waterproof front. The tricky part then is getting the LED placed on your aluminum slug so that it lines up with the reflector.
    Just use a little 5 minute epoxy, very little. I use an optically destroyed Fraen as the guide for centering the PCB. Do use old optics alot to align or move the led/pcbs.

    4. I used a tubing endcap and drilled holes for the switch and power wires.My ends are just small polycarb circle or milk jug plastic circle covered with 5 minute JB Weld.



    The hole in the bottom is a rivet nut and is used to attach the light to it's mount.That is a really good idea. I drill and tap the slug on some lights if adding a mount.

    5. You can buy pre-anodized aluminum tubing with a 1.375 inner diameter from places like McMaster-Carr for $22 for 6 feet. Don't get me wrong, you anodizing looks pretty cool, but I didn't want a bunch of sulfur fumes in my garage.
    Cool.

    6. The ribbing is not really needed if you keep moving.I believe your driver has only has one light level, so the ribbing will help dissipate heat from the LED, but I suspect if you still for very long your light gets pretty hot.
    One level, and lights are off when stopped. They do stay reasonably cool even at rest. Lots of surface area there. The flat top and bottom are for mounting the switch and the 3M Dual Lock on the bottom. The fins are for Style.

    Mark

    PS: Where the heck are you getting the Fraen reflectors, most US distributors seem to have dropped them? I still have a box of 50 or so of the narrow laying about someplace, PM me if you need more.

    I purchase 2 dozen back in March and have been experimenting/destroying them ever since. If you drill them out a little they will fit over the P7 in the Bastid. The Narrow will give a much better beam for throw, and the Medium has incredible smooth flood when fit on the P7 Bastid.

    Thanks again Mark..

  18. #18
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    Here's a thread where I talk about improving the MagicShine driver: First Impressions of DX SSC P7 Bike Light, might be helpful reading.

    The small 6 pin IC on the board is the main controller chip: http://www.micro-bridge.com/data/semi-micro/SM5241.pdf I haven't managed to find an english version yet.

    You can get some 0.16 ohm 1206 current sense resistors from Digikey: http://search.digikey.com/scripts/Dk...e=RHM.16SCT-ND That should give you about 2.5 amps to the LED.

    If you want to get close to 3 amps, the best you'll be able to do is about 3.08 amps using two 0.13 ohm resistors: http://search.digikey.com/scripts/Dk...e=RHM.13QCT-ND or http://search.digikey.com/scripts/Dk...e=RHM.13SCT-ND

    Here's a diode I use in some of my drivers that should work on this: http://search.digikey.com/scripts/Dk...-E3/52TGICT-ND

    Since all the parts on the driver board get pretty hot, I'd recommend providing some kind of thermal path to the sides of the housing. Perhaps coat the whole mess in Artica Alumina epoxy, I have never tried that though. I use a special hot melt glue to coat all the parts on my custom driver, and add enuff that there is contact with my housing.

    Mark
    Nimium est melior!

  19. #19
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    Thanks so much for the information and links. Time to tinker.

  20. #20
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    MC-E N bin @ 3500mA Fraen Narrow reflector VS MC-E M bin @ 2400mA Fraen Narrow reflector
    The fins are probably needed for the N bin at 3500mA.

    Right of center shot is N bin. Much more intense center. Pic does not do justice to the difference between the two lights.
    Foreground tree in upper shot is about 44 foot from camera/light position.
    The double V shaped tree on the right of hot spot is at 110 foot.
    Trees in very back of shot are at 180 foot.

    Edit- Measure actual distance today and updated above.


    So the Fraen Narrow is giving me a sweet spot from about 80ft to 130 ft.
    Last edited by odtexas; 11-29-2010 at 10:02 AM.

  21. #21
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    While it might be a favorite tool, please tell me you aren't thinking of a chainsaw build!

    We don't need a movie called 'Odtexas Chainsaw Suicide'!

    I have a nice saw scar in my left hand index finger that twinges every time I use it to assemble nuts on bolts. I use it as a talisman to guide me away from stupid unsafe setups.

    Nice use of safety equipment, I assume a push stick, too?

    That N Bin sure is something, with that reflector!

    Somehow rusting out the garage door opener and my wood-working tools by anodizing is not 'on'. Thanks for that observation. I can make alternate plans.

    BTW, this is a very nice build thread with the two lights of slightly different approaches and driver discussion!

  22. #22
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    Looking at my original lights I sometimes think I made them with a chainsaw.

    When we do trail work the crew gives me my own area to run amuck in with my chainsaws.

    No push sticks unfortunataley. Good gear, good grip, and know when to release and duck for cover.

    No worries.

    Got the other two N bins put together today. Here is the threesome.



    On the helmet.
    Last edited by odtexas; 11-29-2010 at 06:13 PM.

  23. #23
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    wow, no one's going to be able to hide from you! what are the different reflectors? BoomSS, Fraen narrow and ?

    I'm idly thinking about an MC-E bar light, so I'm squirreling info away until it's needed

  24. #24
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    Fraen Narrow for the 40 to 100 foot stuff
    The little guy is a Boom Medium. Good from about 10 to 40 foot. It is aimed about 20 ft lower than the Fraen Narrow.
    Then the Fraen Medium on the bars for fill and shadow relief.

  25. #25
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    ah, I see

    if you were to have only one as a bar light together with, say, a twin XP-G, which would you go for? Tricky Q I know, but I'm interested. I'll most likely be going with a Fraen compatible housing, so it would be choosing between the 2 Fraens. Thanks!

    oh, and cool lights too, they look way more professional than their beginnings would suggest

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