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Thread: Taro?

  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by in-vico View Post
    Maybe part of the answer is in the fork offset. Kona's website spec 46mm for the Taro. 140mm forks use to have 51mm offset. Maybe this avoid wandering of all the 140mm honzo/taro happy users...?
    Maybe, offset could change the feel, BUT it would not change the geometry nearly enough to compensate for jacking up the front end an additional 20mm.

    I concur with Haggis, a more slacker front end would not make for a nicer riding bike, so if you insist on running a bigger fork on these frames, it'd be worthwhile getting an adjustable angle headset.

    120mm is enough for a hard tail, any more than that and there is just too much geometry change, might as well have an FS, but to each their own. It's an expensive "chance" to spring for a fork and not get a good ride, many bikes are spec'd for a fork so they have a certain geometry... don't wanna spend a bunch of $$ only to make a bike ride worse.

    I have recently ridden a number of similar bikes from Canfield, a custom frame builder, and a custom Honzo, each has a slightly different feel in the front end. Realizing that there are tons of variables involved in tweaking feel, the custom and the Canfield are running 140mm forks and did not feel to slacker at all. The frame up custom Honzo SS was running a 120 mm Fox fork and it felt more sluggish than it does with the 120mm Revelation; a different offset?

    On an aside, I replaced my stock rear Ardent 2.25 with an Ardent 2.4 EXO last night, and lo and behold that rear tire is a thin sidewall wire bead version weighing in at ~800gms!! Unlike the Honzo, this bike gets the cheap rear tire, so upgrading to a 2.4 didn't add any weight

  2. #77
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    Nice info about the stock tire weights!

    About Geometry, just think what is the result if(as an example) you build a Taro with a 140mm X-Fusion Trace... Look, first, the Trace is 2mm "axle to crown" shorter than a Revelation/Sektor. Second point is that going from 120mm to 140mm doesn't mean that you will be 20mm higher. This is because during the ride these 20mm will be sagged too. So when you are on the bike, 20mm travel upgrade will convert to 14-15mm in height increase. Substract from that the 2mm of the shorter X-Fusion Trace and you are at 12-13mm over 2013 stock Taro and only about 4-5mm over a sagged 2014 stock Taro OR any stock sagged Honzo!(remember that with the same geometry, a Taro has 10mm more "room" for the fork than a Honzo -> see previous posts in this thread about zero stack lower cup and new 130mm 2014 Taro)

    So these 140mm are obtained with only 4-5mm riding height increase over a Honzo or a 2014 Taro where lot of happy Honzo users are riding with the taller Fox 34(5mm longer than Rev and 7mm longer than Trace), which means 19-20mm front height increase over stock riding height and about 1 degree slacker front end, and again, most of these users report clear benefits in the general handling of the bike.

    So my little empyrical research tend to say that a 140mm Trace upgraded TARO is still a very conservative build. (only 4-5mm front riding height increase versus 14-20mm for most builds in this forum).



    Now something more subjective is that, looking at the builds, I am starting to think that the point of view difference come from the fact that most Taro USERS seems to be more XC oriented than Honzo USERS, and probably they chose the Taro over a Honzo because of the 2lbs lighter frame, but the fact is that besides the 10mm headset height difference these two frames have the same geometry.

    So, if there is a lot of 140mm Honzo happy users, then there can be a lot of 150mm Taro happy users too.


    P.S. sorry for my bad english, I am still learning...

  3. #78
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    I suppose a fork with more travel would be fine for some people, But this bike is not really a "big hit" bike, it's more attuned to a big boyz bmxer with some really big hoops.

    I ride in East TN, it's very rugged, lots of rocks and roots, goat path kind of trails, real single speed country, and the Taro is a great bike to rip around on. I don't really need a lot of suspension because the speeds are moderate, for the most part a fork takes the sting off and keeps the tire on the ground.

    If someone wants a big fork, it makes me wonder why they don't want rear suspension to boot. A big front end that squishes a long ways is not gonna be all that fun, the geometry will be poor except when the fork is fairly compressed, but this compression won't last long, so for most of the ride the head angle will be super slack, too slack.

    Ideally a hardtail would be ridden full rigid to take advantage of the constant geometry, adding a fork is a compromise not matter how you slice it, whereas FS is designed to work together. Just my take, for all it's worth, I just wanna make sure readers don't make a mistake and think big forks make a bike ride better, it's generally the opposite unless the frame is designed for the longer travel fork.

  4. #79
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    Like you said its just about the kind of terrain you use to ride, if you ride most "flat" trails, 120mm is more than your needs. But if you ride MOUTAINS, because we are talking about "All-MOUNTAIN hard tail" frames, 140mm is just right on a 29er. Just look these 650b hardtails with 150mm forks and 66 Head tube COMMENCAL BIKES, ALL MOUNTAIN HARDTAIL, HT, NEW, 2014, 150MM, 140MM, 130MM, AM, ENDURO

    Of course in all mountain riding a FullSuspended frame will be faster in the DH, but a lot less FUN! This is why there is some AM riders which are selling theirs FS bikes after riding a bike like the Honzo. The big travel in the front "directive" wheel make you feel confident, and the rear "direct", or more "connected" rear wheel let you "feel" the mountain without slowing you too much. There's where the FUN comes from, in the hills and in the downs.

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