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  1. #801
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    Honzo Build Thread - post your builds here

    Quote Originally Posted by mitthew View Post
    I'm 6'0" and 33" inseem and ride L - it's perfect for me. Depends how big you like your bikes, my view (for what it's worth), there's a few tweaks you can make to a bike that's a bit small, but less you can do shrink a bike that's too big. Most bike fitting is based on seated position, but also bare in mind, you are likely to be standing more than you would on an XC bike. A few guys my size seem to for the 18".
    That's kind of my thought too but wanted some 'real world' advice. I'm not a big guy by any means (weight wise) so I am wondering if the XL would be too much bike. I'll try to have my LBS order both so I can give them a try.

  2. #802
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gouda Cheez View Post
    Not sure if this is the right place to post this, but I am going to anyway since this is where all of the Honzo owners congregate...

    I've narrowed my decision down to a Honzo or a Trek Stache. Without being too biased (hehe), what do you guys think? Bike will be ridden primarily on singletrack - quite a bit of climbing and just as much downhill.
    Can't believe in 3 days no one has mentioned the obvious: The Stache has very long chainstays, especially compared to the Honzo. It's the short stays of the Honzo that make it so fun. Not even a comparison IMO.
    2016 Honzo Ti SS
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  3. #803
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gouda Cheez View Post
    Would you guys recommend a L or XL for someone that is 6'1" w/ a 34" inseam (or so)? I am having a hell of a time deciding which one will work best for me. I rode a large at my LBS and it felt fine. They didn't have an XL so I have nothing to compare to.
    I'm 6'6" 36" inseam on a 20L (which I'm assuming is the same as XL in 2013). The TT of the XL is quite long (26"), so unless you have a very long torso (which probably isn't the case if you have a 34" inseam), I'd stick with L.
    2016 Honzo Ti SS
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  4. #804
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    2013 Honzo MRP 1x Issue

    Any of you fellow Honzo riders running a BB mount MRP 1x setup?? Mine seems to be slipping every ride causing the BB drive side to loosen. I thought chain slap may have been the culprit so I removed a couple links. No dice, it's still slipping.

    I'm starting to think the MRP 1x BB mount is probably the wrong tool for the job. I obviously need some chain retention but I do a lot of pedaling with the Honzo so I would prefer to avoid the extra drag a full chainguide creates.

    I have a Jumpstop laying around so I'm debating whether I order a BBG Bash and call it a day or??
    Rollin just to keep on rollin'. I don't want to leave this heaven so soon. - Mark Lanegan

  5. #805
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    Quote Originally Posted by stick-boy1 View Post
    Any of you fellow Honzo riders running a BB mount MRP 1x setup?? Mine seems to be slipping every ride causing the BB drive side to loosen. I thought chain slap may have been the culprit so I removed a couple links. No dice, it's still slipping.

    I'm starting to think the MRP 1x BB mount is probably the wrong tool for the job. I obviously need some chain retention but I do a lot of pedaling with the Honzo so I would prefer to avoid the extra drag a full chainguide creates.

    I have a Jumpstop laying around so I'm debating whether I order a BBG Bash and call it a day or??

    BB mounted guides are a huge pain. I suggest that you make use of those wonderful ISCG tabs you have a go with a proper guide. I run my bike as a 1x9 and the extra drag that you get with a full chain device is not noticeable while pedaling. I can notice it when my bike is in the repair stand and I am turning by hand, but it's not too bad at all.

    Also a full guide makes it very hard to drop a chain if it is set up properly. I haven't had a chain come off my bike in over 2 seasons of riding on a full guide set up.

    MRP also just came out with this guide for 2013. It's basically a Mini G2 without the lower retention. Check it out. Mountain Racing Products home of MRP, White Brothers, Kreitler, Tamer, and Power Grips | AMG

  6. #806
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    Honzo Build Thread - post your builds here

    Quote Originally Posted by stick-boy1 View Post
    Any of you fellow Honzo riders running a BB mount MRP 1x setup?? Mine seems to be slipping every ride causing the BB drive side to loosen. I thought chain slap may have been the culprit so I removed a couple links. No dice, it's still slipping.

    I'm starting to think the MRP 1x BB mount is probably the wrong tool for the job. I obviously need some chain retention but I do a lot of pedaling with the Honzo so I would prefer to avoid the extra drag a full chainguide creates.

    I have a Jumpstop laying around so I'm debating whether I order a BBG Bash and call it a day or??
    I'm currently running my Honzo 1x10 with a Jump Stop and outer bash. Works like a charm. Wasn't into the full-on clunky chainguide system that came with the bike, but then I don't drop anything over a couple feet in height.

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  7. #807
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    Quote Originally Posted by stick-boy1 View Post
    Any of you fellow Honzo riders running a BB mount MRP 1x setup?? Mine seems to be slipping every ride causing the BB drive side to loosen. I thought chain slap may have been the culprit so I removed a couple links. No dice, it's still slipping.

    I'm starting to think the MRP 1x BB mount is probably the wrong tool for the job. I obviously need some chain retention but I do a lot of pedaling with the Honzo so I would prefer to avoid the extra drag a full chainguide creates.

    I have a Jumpstop laying around so I'm debating whether I order a BBG Bash and call it a day or??

    I would also suggest using the ISCG tabs and at least that MRP guide JoshM linked.

    My Honzo is set up SS, but I used a Jumpstop and Bashguard on my AM 26" bike (1x10) for a bit and it sucked, I dropped chain quite a bit. Didn't really cover any big jumps or drops chain would just drop when tearing through rocky, rooty areas. That hasn't been an issue since I started using an e13 LG1+
    Mostly a rigid SS, sometimes a geared HT

  8. #808
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    Thanks for the replies guys. Any thoughts or experience with this:

    Blackspire Einfachx Chainguide 2013 | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com

    I find the MRP 1x is good enough for chain retention it just shifts because of it's BB mounting.
    Rollin just to keep on rollin'. I don't want to leave this heaven so soon. - Mark Lanegan

  9. #809
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    Framesaver

    The fact that some of you are wasting your time worrying about your frames corroding because of rust really amuses me.

    The fact that some of you are going to the lengths of wasting your time using framesaver also makes me chuckle.

    It's clear that most of you young guns are only used to riding alloy frames and you assume that a steel frame is going to rust before your very eyes.

    Now I live in the UK where it has been known to rain (just a little bit)

    I have recently stripped my 1994 Chromoly Kona Cinder Cone (a real Kona) and there is no sign of any rust or corrosion.

    You people seriously need to relax and enjoy your bikes, worrying about minor details is only going to stress you all out

  10. #810
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    Honzo Build Thread - post your builds here

    Quote Originally Posted by superstar1 View Post
    The fact that some of you are wasting your time worrying about your frames corroding because of rust really amuses me.

    The fact that some of you are going to the lengths of wasting your time using framesaver also makes me chuckle.

    It's clear that most of you young guns are only used to riding alloy frames and you assume that a steel frame is going to rust before your very eyes.

    Now I live in the UK where it has been known to rain (just a little bit)

    I have recently stripped my 1994 Chromoly Kona Cinder Cone (a real Kona) and there is no sign of any rust or corrosion.

    You people seriously need to relax and enjoy your bikes, worrying about minor details is only going to stress you all out
    I live in the Pacific NorthWet and keep my bikes in my garage which becomes a pretty humid place during Orygun's winters (but better than under a tarp outside). I've owned a zillion steel frames including an old ('86) Specialized Stumpy frame that I built into a beach bike (w/zerked BB, hubs, headset, pedals so I could pump out the saltwater by purging it with a grease gun after each beach ride). I literally rode this bike underwater for years. Eventually it did rust out, but the frame never actually failed, rather I tossed it before it crumbled from decay. When I finally saw evidence of extreme internal rust at the vent holes, etc. I knew it was time. Anyway like I said, it took years and this bike was ridden underwater in the surf -- salt water no less. Superstar1 is correct, steel is tough, especially heavy gauge steel and let's face it, our Honzos are made of thick stuff. That said, I sprayed my Honzo's interior with Framesaver as soon as I assembled the bike simply because I had a can lying around... doing so can't hurt. Once rust takes hold, there is no stopping it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by riverrat
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  11. #811
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    Did any of you who build their Honzo from frame up perform this step when installing the headset? How to build a bike-part 1 of 12 - YouTube

    A friend of mine tells me it is usually not necessary on Kona frames, as they are pretty clean from factory. I'm not sure.

  12. #812
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    I didn't do it for either of the ones I built up, but you should inspect the heatube for any obvious material/paint that might make a headset seat incorrectly.

  13. #813
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    Oh okay, if there are small irregularities I could probably remove them using sand paper.

  14. #814
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    The bottom face of the headtube on mine was so out of square that the shop guy (the only shop in town that had the 43.95mm reamer, special ordered to do the job, no less) had to readjust the tension on the centering cone three times to get a good cut.

    Internal diameter was off by a bit too.

    Afterward, headset installation (I did that myself) was like a beautiful dream.
    Last edited by p4nh4ndle; 04-21-2013 at 02:12 PM.

  15. #815
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    Is that something I could visually verify if so much correction would be needed? Or do you really need those special tools?

  16. #816
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    You could check perpendicularity with a combination square.

    I used a vernier to get an idea of what the internal diameter was like.

  17. #817
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    Since everyone wants to know how much these things weigh: without using any super-light parts, mine (small frame) comes in at 28lbs even, with a tube in the front tire.

    Trail test and glamour shots tomorrow morning (you know, when the light is better).
    Last edited by p4nh4ndle; 04-23-2013 at 03:51 AM.

  18. #818
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    To lighten up the bike nerdery that is happening, here is an actual riding pic of the Honzo.
    First log ride drop of the season.

    Honzo Build Thread - post your builds here-p4220035.jpg

    Now, back to the regular programmed bike nerdery.

    I'll add to the nerdery by telling you that I snapped my rear axle of my SunRingle Charger Pro. I was wondering why my rear tire was rubbing like crazy on my ride yesterday. Pulled the wheel off the bike to find I could remove the cassette and freehub with my hand!
    This is the first on any bike that I've managed to snap an axle!

  19. #819
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    Been there, done that. I've snapped an axle of a notubes HD (heavy duty) rear hub and just recently bent an axle of a notubes regular hub. I have upgraded to 12x142 and don't anticipate any future failures. BTW, the thru axle resists lateral forces a lot better. It's not scientific, but I have no tire rub marks so far from my 2.4 ardent in the rear. With a quick release, I could make it buzz the frame when taking hard corners or even when pedaling really hard on a switch back.

    All Honzo owners should upgrade to 12x142.
    Quote Originally Posted by RideEverything View Post
    To lighten up the bike nerdery that is happening, here is an actual riding pic of the Honzo.
    First log ride drop of the season.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P4220035.jpg 
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    Now, back to the regular programmed bike nerdery.

    I'll add to the nerdery by telling you that I snapped my rear axle of my SunRingle Charger Pro. I was wondering why my rear tire was rubbing like crazy on my ride yesterday. Pulled the wheel off the bike to find I could remove the cassette and freehub with my hand!
    This is the first on any bike that I've managed to snap an axle!

  20. #820
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    Quote Originally Posted by carabao View Post
    All Honzo owners should upgrade to 12x142.
    Guys, where did you get your 142 drops & how much?

    Thanks for the tip- going 142x12 on my other 29'er so this is good timing....

  21. #821
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    some parksin

    the exit off this log ride is not as big as the entrance (Frick Park)

    Honzo Build Thread - post your builds here-honzo-log.jpg

    setup is still in flux. the gnarbar may go or stay, as may the 60mm stem (I could go for a 70mm in spite of possibly incurring eurospec's wrath)

    not that it's visible in this picture, but the rear hub is Chris King ISO 9spd laced with black 14-15g to a WTB Laser disc trail 29er rim set up tubeless with an SLX 675 brake caliper; cranks are truvative firex; seatpost is thompson (and it slips a bit >:[ )

    the bottom bracket is indeed low...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Honzo Build Thread - post your builds here-honzo-log.jpg  


  22. #822
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    Quote Originally Posted by FM View Post
    Guys, where did you get your 142 drops & how much?

    Thanks for the tip- going 142x12 on my other 29'er so this is good timing....

    You purchase them by calling Kona's store. I think they were $60 for the pair and the maxle lite could be found for another $60 online.

  23. #823
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    I managed to make some photo trickery with my sequence shots of the log ride.

    Honzo Build Thread - post your builds here-trashpano.jpg

  24. #824
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    Quote Originally Posted by carabao View Post
    You purchase them by calling Kona's store. I think they were $60 for the pair and the maxle lite could be found for another $60 online.
    I'd be all over it, if only the Sun Ringle Charger Expert 2011 were convertible. The only option right now for me is to get some Stan's 10mm endcaps and run a 10mm QR or DT Swiss axle since I read they fit the Sun Ringle hub. Another option would be to get a Hope Pro 2 Evo 28h rear hub and rebuild my rear wheel, but that's only the last resort if something does happen to my stock hub and Sun Ringle won't warranty. But in all honesty, last season I was much heavier and didn't notice much flex in the rear end running the Charger Experts and ditched the flimsy QR skewer for a Chromag QR. Maybe I'm not riding hard enough lol, but really my rear end feels just as still when I was on a set of Mavic EX721 36h laced to Hope Pro 2 hubs before this bike. And those were running a solid 10mm nutted axle too on the TransAM.

    As it's still raining like mad here in the Midwest, last minute upgrades have been ordered before I get it dirty for the first time soon, I'm going clipless!! Shimano AM45 shoes and 785 XT Trail SPD pedals en route. I will either love or hate this experience, but I'm hoping for the former.
    konahonzo

  25. #825
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    Honzo Build Thread - post your builds here

    Quote Originally Posted by RideEverything View Post
    I managed to make some photo trickery with my sequence shots of the log ride.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Very nice on the log exit/drop and the photo sequencing as well.

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  26. #826
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    With regards to stiffness, I can't say I definitely feel it, but I know it's stiffer because the lack of tire buzz is undeniable. I also think it corners more accurately, but it's hard to pinpoint. The lateral stiffness actually seems to amplify tire squirm.

    I go back and forth with flats/clipless. I think you'll like the control and power they give you, but you'll miss the instant dabability. They allow you to lighten the rear end and make you smoother because you don't have to weight the pedals. I think they make me 15-20 percent faster uphill and over chunky trails. You just don't have to think about your feet and can focus on the terrain. If you want a much lighter shoe I recommend the Mavic Alpine XL.

    Quote Originally Posted by eurospek View Post
    I'd be all over it, if only the Sun Ringle Charger Expert 2011 were convertible. The only option right now for me is to get some Stan's 10mm endcaps and run a 10mm QR or DT Swiss axle since I read they fit the Sun Ringle hub. Another option would be to get a Hope Pro 2 Evo 28h rear hub and rebuild my rear wheel, but that's only the last resort if something does happen to my stock hub and Sun Ringle won't warranty. But in all honesty, last season I was much heavier and didn't notice much flex in the rear end running the Charger Experts and ditched the flimsy QR skewer for a Chromag QR. Maybe I'm not riding hard enough lol, but really my rear end feels just as still when I was on a set of Mavic EX721 36h laced to Hope Pro 2 hubs before this bike. And those were running a solid 10mm nutted axle too on the TransAM.

    As it's still raining like mad here in the Midwest, last minute upgrades have been ordered before I get it dirty for the first time soon, I'm going clipless!! Shimano AM45 shoes and 785 XT Trail SPD pedals en route. I will either love or hate this experience, but I'm hoping for the former.

  27. #827
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    While clipless generally makes you a lazier bunny hopper, I'd say the benefits of clipless on a Honzo warrant their use. I ride flat pedals in the winter to keep my feet warm and debated permanently switching pedal systems. But I ended up sticking with my old ATAC pedals anyway.

    I'm glad I did. Despite what flat pedal proponents will say, on a single speed, there are times, when riding flat pedals, where you run out of gearing and momentum, and despite your best efforts, you push down on your front pedal and merely raise yourself in to the air rather than propelling the bike forward.

    One *can* rip the rear pedal around to keep the party going in those situations, if on a clipless system. Also, spiking yourself with a pedal stud hurts like hell; emergency clip-out generally isn't a problem after the first ride.

    That said, I did buy a pair of Hellcats to replace my totally worn out crabon XC shoes. And I almost bought it because the sole interfered with the little raised portion of the rear of the ATAC pedal body.
    Last edited by p4nh4ndle; 04-25-2013 at 03:58 AM. Reason: syntax

  28. #828
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    This video shows situations where clipless is ideal. Sure it can all be done on flats, but I don't think it could be done at this speed or as smooth. Especially check out the 2:00 min mark.


  29. #829
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    Not to date myself, but my first decade mountain bike riding I rode clipped in exclusively. Then along came "free ride"! It was immediately obvious that flats were the way to go for 90% of us. I saw too many friends get injured due to being stuck to their bikes while airborne or coming off elevated stuff, especially at whistler.

    So I spent 1-2 seasons riding SPD's for XC riding and flats for FR/DH, but never feeling comfortable. So I switched to flats full time 5-6yrs ago (?)and realized a few things:
    I enjoy riding flats more, especially since I can stand on the edge of the outside pedal while cornering, shift my feet to point where I want the bike to go, etc.
    Jumping became a lot more intuitive.
    My knees no longer hurt after long rides. Although clips allow you to pull up with your pedal stroke, I am not sure thatís a good thing!
    Rides that involved hike-a-bike or trail building were more fun. And most all good rides have some!
    Once my technique adjusted, clips no longer seemed to provide a climbing advantage. I also found I could run my saddle lower which is a bonus for technical climbing.

    I still put in ~100 miles a week on a road bike clipped in. I donít really notice the difference going back & forth anymore. I might try a few rides clipped in this summer, just to mix it up, but there is no doubt in my mind that flat pedals build better technique. Searching around you will notice Jinya runs flats on most of his bikes.

  30. #830
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    First off, sweet video! Second I don't totally agree with carabao that the trail couldn't be ridden like that on flats. I think an expert on flats could totally shred that trail. What I think clipless is like is full suspension. It makes things easier, faster and more comfortable (except in the case of FM's knees). But some people like to ride flats (or a hardtail) for personal preference, comfort (not the hardtail) or just because. Surely a bunch of Honzo enthusiasts would agree?

  31. #831
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    I enjoy the flats vs. clips topic and the insight different riders provide, but in the end it always comes back to rider preferance based on terrain and purpose. I like both and wouldn't want to have to commit to either. It's fun going back and forth, but from a performance standpoint I find being clipped in more efficient and faster for me up and down.

    Btw, I read an interview with Jinya where he stated that clipless allow him to be smoother and faster, but he uses flats for huge jumps, gaps, and gnarlier pursuits.
    Quote Originally Posted by FM View Post
    Not to date myself, but my first decade mountain bike riding I rode clipped in exclusively. Then along came "free ride"! It was immediately obvious that flats were the way to go for 90% of us. I saw too many friends get injured due to being stuck to their bikes while airborne or coming off elevated stuff, especially at whistler.

    So I spent 1-2 seasons riding SPD's for XC riding and flats for FR/DH, but never feeling comfortable. So I switched to flats full time 5-6yrs ago (?)and realized a few things:
    I enjoy riding flats more, especially since I can stand on the edge of the outside pedal while cornering, shift my feet to point where I want the bike to go, etc.
    Jumping became a lot more intuitive.
    My knees no longer hurt after long rides. Although clips allow you to pull up with your pedal stroke, I am not sure thatís a good thing!
    Rides that involved hike-a-bike or trail building were more fun. And most all good rides have some!
    Once my technique adjusted, clips no longer seemed to provide a climbing advantage. I also found I could run my saddle lower which is a bonus for technical climbing.

    I still put in ~100 miles a week on a road bike clipped in. I donít really notice the difference going back & forth anymore. I might try a few rides clipped in this summer, just to mix it up, but there is no doubt in my mind that flat pedals build better technique. Searching around you will notice Jinya runs flats on most of his bikes.

  32. #832
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    You're probably right about an expert on flats shredding that trail, but if you're referring to the 2 min. mark where the rider is bucked, I still believe that same rider would definitely be faster clipped in than on flats. Of course the rider could ride the entire trail on flats, but from a speed perspective, I just don't see how being clipped in isn't an advantage resulting in a faster/smoother descent.

    Quote Originally Posted by ILVMTB View Post
    First off, sweet video! Second I don't totally agree with carabao that the trail couldn't be ridden like that on flats. I think an expert on flats could totally shred that trail. What I think clipless is like is full suspension. It makes things easier, faster and more comfortable (except in the case of FM's knees). But some people like to ride flats (or a hardtail) for personal preference, comfort (not the hardtail) or just because. Surely a bunch of Honzo enthusiasts would agree?

  33. #833
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    Quote Originally Posted by eurospek View Post
    It's been covered so many times.

    Cane Creek 40

    Universal Cycles -- Cane Creek 40 EC44/40 1.5" Lower Assembly
    Universal Cycles -- Cane Creek 40-Series ZS44 Upper Assembly

    Cane Creek 110
    Universal Cycles -- Cane Creek 110 EC44/40 1.5" Lower Assembly
    Universal Cycles -- Cane Creek 110-Series ZS44 1 1/8" Upper Assembly

    Chris King Inset7
    Universal Cycles -- Chris King Griplock InSet 7 Tapered Headset

    Nukerproof
    Nukeproof Warhead 44IETS Headset 2012 | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com

    I have a CC40 and would definitely buy it again, anything above that is just bike bling.

    There's also a Hope headset that fits, its lower cup is huge and most likely will have to be special ordered via LBS from Hope UK directly.
    So, I think I have bought the wrong bottom assembly. The website I ordered them from only listed EC44, so I thought that was the right one. Obviously, looking at the picture, it doesn't fit. Or am I doing something wrong?

    It doesn't help that the Cane Creek website (110-Series) names it EC44/40 but when you click on the image, and select the black one, it says EC44/47, just as my one does.

    And of course I noticed this after the period in which I could return it has expired

    I did get the wrong one, didn't I?
    Honzo Build Thread - post your builds here-img_20130426_221723.jpg

  34. #834
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    Looks to me like you have the correct cup/bearing, but the wrong crown race for your fork. You probably have the crown race for a straight 1-1/8" steerer, rather than the 1.5 crown race for a tapered steerer.

  35. #835
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    It all came in one little box, are you supposed to buy the crown race seperately? Even without the crown race the cup doesn't go all the way down the steerer tube. Only when I remove the bearing inside the cup does it drop all the way down.

  36. #836
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    You should be able to just order the correct crown race and lower bearing for 1.5" tapered to get it to work. The cup looks correct. Try calling CC directly. They have always been very helpful.

  37. #837
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    I'll mail them (I live in Europe), but I doubt if the cup is correct. With the bearing and crown race removed it fits with only a mm or 2 to spare, I don't see how it could include any bearing in that small space. I think the correct EC44/40 cup has a wider lower body to accomodate the bearing as the one I got. Or then again, maybe I'm wrong again. Weird that their website doesn't mention the EC44/47, I've only found it in an older catalogue, which says it is indeed meant for a traditional steerer. (http://old.canecreek.com/manuals/201...ek_OEM_110.pdf)

  38. #838
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    This is what Cane Creek said:
    There are two different EC44 assemblies, you just got the wrong one. The EC44/40 is to convert to a fork that is tapered 1 1/8 to 1.5, which could be used with a reducer crown race for a straight 1 1/8 steerer ( EC44/30). The EC44/33 is to convert to a fork that is tapered 1 1/8 to 1 1/4, it uses a 47mm bearing (1 1/4).

    Still don't know what the EC44/47 is though, but it's obviously not the correct one.

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  40. #840
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    Honzo Build Thread - post your builds here

    Quote Originally Posted by carabao View Post
    You're in San Diego, right? How do you like riding the bike on trails around here?

  41. #841
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gouda Cheez View Post
    You're in San Diego, right? How do you like riding the bike on trails around here?
    I could go on and on about how much I love this bike. I started this thread almost two years ago. It's simply the perfect bike for my style of riding and what I like to ride, which is all mountain and the occasional enduro race. Buy one, you won't regret it. Centre City Bikes in Escondido is a great shop to deal with. Marc is a cool guy.

  42. #842
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    Honzo Build Thread - post your builds here

    I paid him a visit a few weekends ago - seemed like an awesome guy. Should be ready to purchase something in the next month or so.

  43. #843
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmreal View Post
    I would also suggest using the ISCG tabs and at least that MRP guide JoshM linked.

    My Honzo is set up SS, but I used a Jumpstop and Bashguard on my AM 26" bike (1x10) for a bit and it sucked, I dropped chain quite a bit. Didn't really cover any big jumps or drops chain would just drop when tearing through rocky, rooty areas. That hasn't been an issue since I started using an e13 LG1+
    Thanks for the input. I purchased the e13 LS1 and it works like a charm.

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    Rollin just to keep on rollin'. I don't want to leave this heaven so soon. - Mark Lanegan

  44. #844
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    Long time reader first time poster. I'm looking to build a 2012 Honzo SS. I just bought the frame and am wanting to do my first ground up build. I'm coming from a Haro Mary SS. I'm a big guy bout 6'1" 240lbs. So I'd like for this build to be as stout as possible. I'm essentially looking for a build that will last me awhile but not wanting to spend crazy amounts of money. I was gonna start with a 2012 large Honzo frame and a 140mm Revelation RCT3 front fork. Can anyone recommend a SS build list for the rest of the parts for me? Thanks

  45. #845
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    Can't help with the SS parts list, but I think you should consider a different fork. The Pike would be my first choice and it comes out on June 10th. I run a fox float 34 and I'm happy with it, but the 35mm stanchions of the Pike has me curious. I can recommend SLX cranks and Renthal chainrings and bars. They're stout. Oh, and Flow EX wheels.

  46. #846
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    Why should I consider a different fork? That Pike looks great, but I have a feeling it will be quite a bit more than a leftover RCT3 roughly $600. The rest sounds great.

  47. #847
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    The RCT3 is fine, especially if it's 20mm axle, but considering your weight (I'm 200 pounds) I thought you'd appreciate the stiffest fork available. I know I can tell a huge difference between my Float 32 and Float 34. $600 is a great deal, BTW.

  48. #848
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    Oh ok. I would like a stiffer fork. Maybe I should look at the float 34. Any ideas on price of the pike?

  49. #849
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    I think you may be able to preorder from Universal cycles and get 15% off retail. You'll have to shop around. Retail is over $900. FYI, the pike and float 34 are 15mm only.

  50. #850
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    I felt a bigger difference going from the 32mm Revelation to the 34mm Float than axle size. I wouldn't pay much attention to the 20mm debate. Definitely recommend going with 34mm platform fork. I was similar weight last year and the Revelation felt like a noodle. I love my Fox Float 34 and would buy it again for sure. As for the Pike, it's uncharted territory yet, I wouldn't be buying a first year product. Look at the CTD stuff. Only lasted a year before Fox has changed their tunes completely on the them.

    If you're dead-set on the Revelation, the RL Revelation under $430 from CRC is also worth a look.

    Renthal bars for sure. Especially if you're getting the 2012 blue frameset. I've been curious to see how those match the blue.
    konahonzo

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