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  1. #1
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    torque specs: a LBS complaint

    Needed a new rear brake line so I took it to my local shop. Picked up the bike and the tech handed it to me and said "I noticed one of the bolts seemed loose so I tightened all the bolts on the bike. I didn't think too much of it as I grabbed the bike, but it did scare me a bit, they don't carry, nor had they heard of Knolly. So, what do I hear today, the creak of bushings when I hit larger bumps.........ughh, took it back with a print out of the torque specs, hope it didn't hurt anything.......good intentions....I suppose
    Master of Nothing, but dammit if I don't try..............

  2. #2
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    Is that cause over tightening damages the bushings?

    Had the bike shop tighten my pedals so hard once that it took another guy at the bike shop to use a 2 foot long wrench and a lot of sweat to take them off. Must've been Thor who put them on, it was that hard.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom34 View Post
    Is that cause over tightening damages the bushings?

    Had the bike shop tighten my pedals so hard once that it took another guy at the bike shop to use a 2 foot long wrench and a lot of sweat to take them off. Must've been Thor who put them on, it was that hard.
    That ticks me off beyond belief. Pedals don't need to be elephant-sat-on-the-wrench tight. Not even one full grunt. This happens all the time and is a pretty quick indicator of a hack wrench. Only time I've had a pedal come off while riding was a crank bros mallet snapping at the axle.

    Also worries me that shops would just torque up suspension bolts without checking. Maybe figure the let air out, see how suspension travels without resistance and tighten until things start to seize? That's not a happy thought.

    There are good wrenches and hacks, you just gotta get to know em or do your own work. Torque wrenches are a good investment if you have more than one high end bike.

    Just my thoughts, ymmv.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by thefriar View Post
    There are good wrenches and hacks, you just gotta get to know em or do your own work. Torque wrenches are a good investment if you have more than one high end bike.

    Just my thoughts, ymmv.
    +1 - I have one mechanic at my LBS I let work on my FS bike. I make it clear I don't want anyone else working on my bike. The guy is a pro and the rest are hacks. I never haggle with him about cost I just let him know to take whatever time he needs and fix anything he notices needs fixing.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  5. #5
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    yeah, the thing is, I didn't ask them to touch the bolts. I'd expect a call "hey I noticed a bolt was loose, want me to torque them" to which I could point them to the website with the specs and say, sure man, thanks, just make sure you don't over tighten........
    Master of Nothing, but dammit if I don't try..............

  6. #6
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    It's the same reason I service and build my own bikes ;-)
    When trails gets tougher, Just stand up and deliver.

  7. #7
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    Dig,

    All the bolts on your frame are brand new, never been ridden before you took ownership. They are the anodized version, and they replaced the original non-anodized bolts that are prone to rusting.

    Every bolt was torqued to Knolly's spec with a brand new torque wrench.

    If your LBS just grabbed the closest allen wrench, and started checking pivot bolts, they will easily over-torque the bushings, since the value is only 5.5 N*m, or 48.6 in lbs. You can easily over torque that by hand with any allen wrench, which is probably what happened at the shop.

    Do yourself a big favor, and buy your own torque wrench. They are super affordable from FreightHarbor online. Don't trust your bike shop to work on your high-end frame, unless you are watching over their shoulder.
    "My riding style - like I'm being chased by a clown." - rscecil007

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big B View Post
    Dig,

    All the bolts on your frame are brand new, never been ridden before you took ownership. They are the anodized version, and they replaced the original non-anodized bolts that are prone to rusting.

    Every bolt was torqued to Knolly's spec with a brand new torque wrench.

    If your LBS just grabbed the closest allen wrench, and started checking pivot bolts, they will easily over-torque the bushings, since the value is only 5.5 N*m, or 48.6 in lbs. You can easily over torque that by hand with any allen wrench, which is probably what happened at the shop.

    Do yourself a big favor, and buy your own torque wrench. They are super affordable from FreightHarbor online. Don't trust your bike shop to work on your high-end frame, unless you are watching over their shoulder.
    I know, you sent me that link......and believe me, I didn't want them touching the bolts!! ......... oh and I gotta send you a little something Big B, I haven't forgot! ....... thanks again for hooking me up with this frame, it's AMAZING!!
    Master of Nothing, but dammit if I don't try..............

  9. #9
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    No problem. Here's the link again, for other Knollers if needed.

    1/4" Torque Wrench - 20-200 in. lbs.

    $20, and this will torque every bolt on the bike. It goes up to 200 in*lbs.
    "My riding style - like I'm being chased by a clown." - rscecil007

  10. #10
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    Oh, and in the off chance that they were truly 'loose' (which I doubt), you can always put a spot of blue loctite on the bolt, and then torque to spec. Might want to double check with Knolly first, but I think that is a legitimate solution.

    I've been riding Knolly bikes since 2006, and I've never had to do this. I think braking components are the only thing I've ever loctited (the rotor bolts come with it).
    "My riding style - like I'm being chased by a clown." - rscecil007

  11. #11
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    I hadn't even really spent enough time for them to get loose, I think the shock bolt was loose (I'd just mounted it) and so he decided he'd "hit all of them" for me..... it's back at the shop, so they'll make it right now.
    Master of Nothing, but dammit if I don't try..............

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