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  1. #1
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    New Bike Review! 27.5 Endorphin

    Finally got the review finished for the new Endo. I have about 15 rides under my belt and will update as I get more time in on it.

    The short version: Awesome bike!

    Here's the long version.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails New Bike Review! 27.5 Endorphin-endorphin-pc.jpg  

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  2. #2
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    Nice right up. Thanks for taking the time to put pen to paper. Sounds like another Knolly winner.

  3. #3
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    Good write up, bring on the carbon one!!

  4. #4
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    Nice review Kent! Outside of the fork or a higher rise bar, anything you would change?
    Yamaha & Paiste, weapons of mass percussion

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by drumstix View Post
    Nice review Kent! Outside of the fork or a higher rise bar, anything you would change?
    No, nothing really. If it were possible to get the wheel base back closer to 46" by shortening the chain stays a bit more (maybe 1/4"-1/3") and reducing the reach slightly to 18" for size large without sacrificing climbing and stability in rough stuff I think this bike would be just about perfect for me. These are very small, custom fit-type niggles for me personally and I'm sure Noel and his team have sweated these numbers much more than me for the average size large rider, so take this with a grain of salt...... oh, and release it in carbon.

    I got a chance to take it down one of my super tech descents off the nose of Squaw Peak Saturday and it handled all the super sketchy chutes and drops in a very Chilcotin-like manner. Once the trail opens up into a fast, steep, rough DH run it was very stable, however I realized I need to do a little more adjusting with the clickers on the DB Inline and the fork to get it as plush and smooth as I'd like it. Seemed like the HS rebound was a bit slow perhaps. Or maybe I just found the limit of a 130mm travel trail bike compared to a big, plush 160mm AM bike. I'm crap at diagnosing these subtle suspension nuances.

    I'll do some trial and error fiddling and report back.....once the snow quits.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
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  6. #6
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    I think that seat tubes could be a little shorter as droppers are getting longer. Top tubes and reach go up an inch between sizes while seat tubes go up 1.5? That said I looked at my medium Warden and my 150mm Reverb would just fit on a large. Soon there will be 200mm droppers.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  7. #7
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    This is something that we take seriously at Knolly: in fact, I'm more than comfortable in saying that we've been market leaders in this area and still are!

    Just making a seat tube shorter is tricky and can run into problems: there are limits and in some cases it can be a dis-service to customers at the other end of the spectrum, the ones that are the tallest / longest limbed riders on a particular frame size. We all want to think that every customer is using the newest, most awesome piece of kit and that magically next year, everyone will be on 170-175mm dropper posts. The reality is that many of our customers are purchasing frames to upgrade current bikes and they could have something like a 125mm dropper post and perhaps no dropper post at all. Also, for smaller riders, there is a limit to how long a dropper post can be: this is the limit between the maximum extended seat height and - well - frankly the underside of the down tube! Getting riders in the 5" - 5"5' range on a 125mm or especially 150mm dropper post is tricky: Again, I think we do a better job here than any other brand available, but there is a lot more to it than "just making the seat tube shorter".

    We're currently using 175mm dropper posts as the minimum post length required for ALL frames that we're in process of bringing out: this length has to work for all frame sizes. By default, longer 200mm drop posts should work on any Large and XL frame and probably most medium frames as well. There's enough room in the frame for these posts, but a 200mm drop post is huge! They are about 550 - 560mm in length and that does not include the room required for the cable actuated switch / mounting bracket and cable bend inside the frame...

    Cheers!
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  8. #8
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    Good read on the Endorphin KRob. Having owned a Warden for the past year, something felt familiar about the review. If you removed the part about the seat stay graphics (I agree) and internal cable routing, it could have been a review of the Warden.

    I am not saying they ride exactly the same, but my opinions on the Warden are very similar being a heavier rider on a large frame.
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  9. #9
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    The review is excellent as always. One note for you to ease the Reverb installation, the quick connect is not designed to go through internal routing. Instead you route some derailer housing in from the top. From there unscrew the remote from the hydro housing and there is a special connector that is double threaded that screws into both housings. From there just pull it back through and cut to length. I have never even needed to bleed the system after routing.

    Just hate to see people trying to modifying their frames when there is a much more simple solution.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by knollybikes.com View Post
    This is something that we take seriously at Knolly: in fact, I'm more than comfortable in saying that we've been market leaders in this area and still are!

    Just making a seat tube shorter is tricky and can run into problems: there are limits and in some cases it can be a dis-service to customers at the other end of the spectrum,
    This is absolutely spot-on. I have a friend who is currently tempted by the great deals on Au Warden frames, but the XL seat tube length is 1/2" shorter than his standard "no shorter than" criteria for a frame.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by nilswalk View Post
    This is absolutely spot-on. I have a friend who is currently tempted by the great deals on Au Warden frames, but the XL seat tube length is 1/2" shorter than his standard "no shorter than" criteria for a frame.
    Is your friend running a dropper post? If so, what kind? It's quite uncommon for customers to have issues with XL frame seat tubes being too short. Also, his height and inseam length would be useful. You can PM me if you don't want to post the information publicly.

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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by knollybikes.com View Post
    Just making a seat tube shorter is tricky and can run into problems: there are limits and in some cases it can be a dis-service to customers at the other end of the spectrum, the ones that are the tallest / longest limbed riders on a particular frame size.
    Amen. I was hoping to replace my 5spot with a Burner and was pretty disappointed when instead of increasing the reach with the v3.1 they just shortened the seat tube and bumped anyone who was formerly on the borderline up a size. To get the reach I wanted I'd have to have gone to an XL, the extra inch of seat tube was irrelevant as I run about an inch of post out of my 150mm dropper with a 19" ST, but I didn't want the extra stand over or head tube height. So here I am riding a Warden and couldn't be happier (well, unless it was a carbon one!).
    [and at the same time I appreciate that the same changes may have ha the opposite reaction from someone with shorter legs who could now fit a 150mm dropper on their new Burner]

    TBH, and I'm getting OT here sorry, I'm a bit sceptical as to why anyone would need a 200mm dropper over a 150mm. I've found the 150mm on my Warden (which is, to be fair, my first dropper) puts the seat well out of the way for fast/steep stuff. I don't think it would make a difference if it were 50mm lower.

    And to bring it back on-topic, the Endo sounds like an absolute ripper. I'd love a ride on one to see how it feels compared to the Warden (if any Kiwis are getting one and want to let me take it for a hoon I can pay you in beer!), despite having made my choice I still change my mind about which one would have suited me best at least twice per ride! I'm already saving my pennnies so I can relive the indecision when I can choose between Warden or Endo in carbon...
    Last edited by David R; 11-18-2015 at 01:17 AM.

  13. #13
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    great read Kent! thanks for taking the time to share your impressions.
    "Mi amor Nuevo Miércoles!"

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    .... there is a special connector that is double threaded that screws into both housings.
    Thanks SP.

    Yeah, that's what I used. I thought that is what they were calling the connectamajig. But with it threaded into the housing it's still slightly thicker than the cable (and has less give). ..... and I still had to bleed which was not a big deal either.
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  15. #15
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    Great report as usual Kent! Couldn't agree more. Amazing bike, and versatility to suit everything from xc to just short of real gnarly dh.

    I was concerned with trying out a 35mm stem (years of long stems and thinking weight over the front is always good). I have tried 50mm just because I am still having trouble believing that seeing so much front axle and tire is not going to be trouble. at 5'11" with long arms (74.5" wingspan) and wide shoulders all other bikes I could not get less than 50mm without being cramped. Running the 35mm stem and 800mm bars feels so perfect, really it is what I have wanted in a bike all along but designs kept it from happening. No problems climbing and it is so easy to lift the front end whether getting over and obstacle, or in switchbacks, quick manual, line correction, etc. The control and confidence it gives is still hard to quite grasp. I don't think it would work as well if not for how well balanced the bike is, just keep weight centered and the front never washes or feels unstable. I am running a Mattoc at 150mm with 40mm of stem spacers because the stack is so low, but like you said, that adds to the versatility. With the 50mm stem I almost feel I have too much weight over the front, a bit shorter bars would help probably, but as of right now, the 35mm hasn't shown any drawbacks for me, while giving it a nimbleness that is fun as all get out.

    Haven't mussed with the Inline from stock either, had a couple bottom outs but didn't feel them, so deciding whether to add volume spacers (@200lbs. might need it) or tinker with the settings a bit. Have used the climb switch a few times, but mostly just leave it in open and really don't notice and bobbing, just traction.

    Thank you Knolly for building such a fun, versatile, well built, and well thought out bike. This might be my first Knolly, but it won't be my last.

  16. #16
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    Glad you are enjoying your new ride KRob.

    So the real question everyone wants to know....is there room for 3.25" 29+ tires????
    Safe riding,

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    Quote Originally Posted by knollybikes.com View Post
    Is your friend running a dropper post? If so, what kind? It's quite uncommon for customers to have issues with XL frame seat tubes being too short. Also, his height and inseam length would be useful. You can PM me if you don't want to post the information publicly.

    Cheers!
    Thanks Noel! I sent him this thread so he can pop in and answer himself.

    Loving my Endorphin. Feeling guilty about the neglect my Yeti is getting

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sherwin24 View Post
    Great report as usual Kent! Couldn't agree more. Amazing bike, and versatility to suit everything from xc to just short of real gnarly dh.
    Thanks. Yes, really impressive range on this bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by sherwin24

    Running the 35mm stem and 800mm bars feels so perfect,said, that adds to the versatility.... as of right now, the 35mm hasn't shown any drawbacks for me, while giving it a nimbleness that is fun as all get out.
    Might have to give the 35mm stem a try. I'll try adding that other 10mm spacer under the stem first though to see if that helps the front end come up a little easier and buts me in a little more comfortable position for long climbs. I need to tweak my saddle forward and drop the nose down just bit as well to help with this. My lower back (and nethers) got a little sore on my 45 minute Squaw Peak climb Saturday.

    Quote Originally Posted by sherwin24

    Haven't mussed with the Inline from stock either, had a couple bottom outs but didn't feel them, so deciding whether to add volume spacers (@200lbs. might need it) or tinker with the settings a bit. Have used the climb switch a few times, but mostly just leave it in open and really don't notice and bobbing, just traction.

    Thank you Knolly for building such a fun, versatile, well built, and well thought out bike. This might be my first Knolly, but it won't be my last.
    I didn't get any volume spacers with my Inline and don't know how many are inside as part of the base tune, but it sounds like that may help the ramp up at the end of the stroke while still running 33-35% sag.
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  19. #19
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    Mine didn't come with volume spacers either, but I hear CC will send them if asked. The stock tune calls for no spacers. Being just short of clueless about leverage curves and all that technical stuff, was kind of hoping others would start tinkering with it and post up their thoughts. Considering how well it works with the stock tune, any changes really are just some final tinkering, so not too concerned, but agree, getting a bit of ramp with that 33-35% sag would be the icing on the cake.

    Also agree with just a slight rise in psi to get about 28% sag really firms up the rear if trails called for a bit more pedaling or lots of smooth, climbing as well. Just adds to that versatility.

    One downside of the Endo is an inability to concentrate on my real job, or even want to go to work, and I like my job.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Thanks SP.

    Yeah, that's what I used. I thought that is what they were calling the connectamajig. But with it threaded into the housing it's still slightly thicker than the cable (and has less give). ..... and I still had to bleed which was not a big deal either.
    Is this what you guys are talking about?

    Name:  rs8309.jpg
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    or this?

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    I thought I had heard from Knolly that the "Connectamajig" (the black piece) would fit in the internal routing ports. Or maybe that was just on the WardenC.
    "Mi amor Nuevo Miércoles!"

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calhoun View Post
    Is this what you guys are talking about?

    Name:  rs8309.jpg
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    .
    I used the small red connector thing. It worked great. Not sure why I still needed to bleed. Maybe it came that way. I didn't check it before installing.
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  22. #22
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    I've been tweaking the cockpit set up a little over the past two rides. I moved one 10mm spacer from above the stem to under to raise the bars a bit and slid the seat forward on the rails 5-7mm and dropped the nose slightly.

    I was surprised at how high and awkward this made the bars feel. I felt very "On the bike" instead of "in the bike" and disconnected from the front wheel. I almost stopped within a block out of the drive way and switched it back. However, I knew I had a long steep, service road climb ahead of me that I didn't like with the previous set up (too stretched out, sore lower back by time I got up to the top) so I left it.

    Once I got to the climb I really liked the new position. Not only did my back (and my nethers) not hurt at the top but the new saddle position put me in a much better position for climbing and I was able to consistently run a little taller gear. So maybe my observations about the 170 cranks being harder to turn over could be moderated a bit now. Standing and hammering was more comfortable as well and I didn't feel as hunched over.

    Going down the super steep techy bits the "on-the-bike", disconnected from the front wheel feeling came back and I did not like it. Some of this feeling was due to the fork diving too much so today I bumped up the air pressure to 70lbs (was at 62-65psi) and while it felt much better and less disconnected I think I still would prefer the bar in a lower position for steeps. Standing and railing on less steep sections felt pretty good and put in a pretty comfortable attack position, but I think I'll split the difference on the spacers for my next ride and drop it back down 5mm.

    I also opened up the rebound on the fork one click and the HSR on the Inline half a turn on my last run down the fast choppy DH run I referred to above and front and rear both felt much better and the bike stayed connected to ground and much less choppy in the rough.

    The bike continues to impress. I'm sold on the 800 mm bars ow and will not be trimming them or going narrower on any future builds, unless I move somewhere with a bunch of tight trees or narrow slot canyons where the bars simple won't clear.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
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  23. #23
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    Another good write up from Steve Storey, new member of Team Knolly! Congtatz to him, and a nice review. Pretty much echoes what we have been saying about this bike.

    Here is the Link: Knolly Endorphin First Impression - Steve Storey by KNOLLYBIKES - Pinkbike

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sherwin24 View Post
    Another good write up from Steve Storey, new member of Team Knolly! Congtatz to him, and a nice review. Pretty much echoes what we have been saying about this bike.

    Here is the Link: Knolly Endorphin First Impression - Steve Storey by KNOLLYBIKES - Pinkbike
    Yeah, I read that over the weekend - impressive what he can do on the Endorphin, where most folks need a DH bike to even consider it.

  25. #25
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    Doesn't sound any better than the V2.

    I remember reading somewhere that Noel put out V3 based on market demand and he really wanted it to retain all characteristics of V2 but with bigger wheels.

    I wonder if I would have to size down a frame now with an 18mm longer reach? 5'7" on a medium V2 with a 45mm stem.

  26. #26
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    Awesome write up and great pics. Stoked Knolly keeps adding riders
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  27. #27
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    Hey LaxCarp:

    Good memory, but the goal was NOT to make it any worse that the 26" V2 Endorphin in ANY category. In the end, we all feel that we were able to keep the "fun factor" of the V2 Endorphin, meet our engineering goals of not going backwards in any performance area, as well as significantly improve performance in several areas. We would never design a bike to be: "just as good at the last one", but we do say: "Even if it's overall better, we don't want certain aspects to be worse than the outgoing model".

    The crazy thing is that when we release a new bike, we feel that it's the best that we can do at the time of release. However, a couple years down the road when we start working on the follow up model, there is usually quite a large list of suggested changes that everyone is in agreement on.

    Cheers,
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  28. #28
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    Great write up, makes me wonder if I would have been better off on an Endo instead of a Warden. I'm still happy though, I'll wait til the carbon one comes out before I upgrade!

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    Great write up, makes me wonder if I would have been better off on an Endo instead of a Warden. I'm still happy though, I'll wait til the carbon one comes out before I upgrade!
    I know what you mean, I would love to have an endo as well as my Warden. I think there a lot of places where the Warden is the better tool for the job though . For me, that includes most of the trails on the North Shore.

    I am curious to see if Kent ends up retiring his Chilcotin or still rides it occasionally.

  30. #30
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    Yeah that was a validating read for me. Good article by Steve Storey. I had a chance to ride some secret stash, steep and gnarly DH trails in Salt Lake City a few weeks back with a local hotshoe but passed and rode some XC stuff in PC instead with other friends because I had the Endo with me instead of the Chilcotin. But the more I ride the Endo and read things like this the more I'm kicking myself for passing up the chance to really test its limits.
    Last edited by KRob; 12-16-2015 at 10:27 AM.
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skooks View Post
    I think there a lot of places where the Warden is the better tool for the job though . For me, that includes most of the trails on the North Shore.

    I am curious to see if Kent ends up retiring his Chilcotin or still rides it occasionally.
    I agree. There's a lot of places where the Warden (and Chilcotin for that matter) is a better tool for the job. It's just impressive what the Endorphin can handle with its dialed, aggressive geometry and robust construction.

    Having said that, I'll still ride the Chilcotin and will probably replace it with a Delirium or RFX or Canfield Balance, or GG Megatrail, or ??? at some point but it certainly gets left hanging in the garage much more often now. Trips to places where I get my big mountain or steep and chunky fix like Mammoth, Northstar, and the North Shore I will still take the Chilcotin .

    I've said this before and I'll say it again: The Chili is also a great back up/all-around bike. I rode it everywhere before I got my 5010, after I sold my 5010, and since I exploded the wheel on my Endorphin and it still works really well and I enjoy riding it on a wide variety of trails.
    Last edited by KRob; 12-15-2015 at 06:09 PM.
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  32. #32
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    Exploded the wheel?

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    I know what you mean but my trails aren't that gnarly. All the trails I ride my mate does on a 26" Endo. I've decided to sell the Warden and get a new Endo. I'll wait a year or two before making a decision on the carbon model.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    I agree. There's a lot of places where the Warden (and Chilcotin for that matter) is a better tool for the job. It's just impressive what the Endorphin can handle with its dialed, aggressive geometry and robust construction.

    Having said that, I'll still ride the Chilcotin and will probably replace it with a Delirium or RFX or Canfield Balance at some point but it certainly gets left hanging in the garage much more often now. Trips to places where I get my big mountain or steep and chunky fix like Mammoth, Northstar, and the North Shore I will still take the Chilcotin .

    I've said this before and I'll say it again: The Chili is also a great back up/all-around bike. I rode it everywhere before I got my 5010, after I sold my 5010, and since I exploded the wheel on my Endorphin and it still works really well and I enjoy riding it on a wide variety of trails.
    I completely agree with your comments about the Chilcotin Kent. I have one and have no plans to get rid of it. I rode it recently on some steeper trails and was reminded just how great a bike it still is. So much fun. The Warden is a better climber for sure, and more agile both up and down, but for anything steep and gnarly I much prefer the Chilcotin. Now I just need an Endo to complete the set!

  35. #35
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    Yeah, the rear wheel had a really brutal encounter with a big rock and lost. Atomik and Dusty at hubsessedcycleworks.com are taking are of me though. Good service. Should have the wheel back in a week or so.

    Quote Originally Posted by G-AIR View Post
    Exploded the wheel?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails New Bike Review! 27.5 Endorphin-atomik-bomb.jpg  

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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by knollybikes.com View Post
    , there is usually quite a large list of suggested changes that everyone is in agreement on.
    Excellent! Thanks for the response Noel...that's the beauty of Knolly. Direct answers from the Owner/Engineer. I didnt mean to come off as flaming the new model, more just carrying over my excellent impression of V2.

    Im curious as to what you wanted to improve with the V2. I love that bike and ride it everywhere, I find it even handles most bike parks just fine (east coast USA). I wouldnt want it at Whistler but everywhere else I can absolutely charge with it.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaXCarp View Post
    Excellent! Thanks for the response Noel...that's the beauty of Knolly. Direct answers from the Owner/Engineer. I didnt mean to come off as flaming the new model, more just carrying over my excellent impression of V2.

    Im curious as to what you wanted to improve with the V2. I love that bike and ride it everywhere, I find it even handles most bike parks just fine (east coast USA). I wouldnt want it at Whistler but everywhere else I can absolutely charge with it.
    Absolutely no offense taken!

    You are correct in your assessment of the V2 Endorphin: it was a bike that all of us at Knolly really, really loved but it had a premature ending due to the industry wide shift to 27.5" wheels.

    Of what we at Knolly call the Gen 3 frames (Chilcotin, Endorphin V2, and Podium V2), I think most of us feel that the Endorphin was the star of that product line: we were very concerned that when we made the switch to 27.5" wheels that we didn't lose any of the magic that made the 26" wheeled Endorphin such a hit with its customers! So, that became the challenge with the V3 Endorphin in 27.5".

    I do feel that we've met that challenge head on and in fact exceeded our expectations on the V3 Endorphin: there is a lot going on with that bike: much more so that just "adapting" the 26" wheeled geometry for 27.5" wheels. The geometry is in line with our "Gen 4" frames: the Warden and the about to be released Delirium. This is frame geometry that we feel is at the forefront of the bike industry. Additionally, there were other changes to the Endorphin that aren't so obvious: the switch to a 44 / 56 headtube allowed us to switch the downtube out on the V3 Endorphin: it's essentially very similar to the Warden downtube, but with thinner wall section to keep the weight down. But it does add a marked improvement in front end lateral stiffness which helps the bike track even better in difficult terrain (not that the V2 Endorphin was lacking in this department!). And of course, there were tweaks to both the pedaling dynamics and suspension performance that can only happen after some time "learning" with the prior generation product.

    So, while the individual changes may be subtle, when combined they make a bike that we feel is worthy of the Endorphin name and one that is a significant evolutionary step beyond the V2 version.

    Cheers!
    Noel Buckley
    ------------------
    www.knollybikes.com

    Instead of PMs, please contact me here.

  38. #38
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    I've had my Endorphin for two years now so after rereading this original review I thought I'd give a long term update.

    First off I have to say I still love the Endorphin. As most of you know I test a lot of bikes at Interbike and Outerbike and I can't say that I've ridden any in the past two years I'd trade the Endorphin for. I'm constantly amazed at how well it does on a very wide range of trails. Still feels very fast on smoother rolling xc trails yet I'm totally confident on it on some of the steepest, gnarliest trails around. It's sizing and balance are spot on. In the initial review I stated how it felt slightly long and slow to transition in back and forth slaloms but I've totally adapted to that now and only notice it when I trade off onto my baby wheeled Chilcotin.

    I love the low slack geometry and surprisingly felt awkward and on top of a tall bike when I switched to the Chili recently (never thought I'd say that about the Chili!)

    I'm on my third set of tires and have blown up the original reverb and traded for a Fox. I've switched out the X Fusion Sweep fork for a 2017 MRP Stage set at 150mm, broken two wheels, worn out one set of pedals and recently had to send my Next SL cranks back for warranty. The only other mods I've done are switching to a more padded Ergon grip and trimming the bars down to 785mm to solve some wrist and forearm pain.

    The frame shows little sign of wear. Pivots are all tight and smooth. I love the raw finish and am glad I went this way. It's a bit scratched in a few places and a bit polished in a few others but it still looks good and the embedded decals are nearly unfazed. Just some slight blemishes on the top tube "Endorphin" from a wayward brake lever from another bike during a long bumpy shuttle. Had there been paint this would've left an ugly scar

    I am intrigued with the 29er Noel has coming, but I'm in no hurry to give up the Endorphin. This bike is sooo good.

    Changes I'd wish for? Not really. It'd be interested to see how it would feel with a slightly slacker head angle and slightly steeper effective seat tube angle. The lowish bb height has not been an issue and I rarely have pedal strikes except in the most extreme square edged, slotted climbing stepped moves. And I love how it carves flat sweepers so wouldn't change that. It would be nice to have just a bit more room for 2.8" tires in the rear but I'm much more likely to go with a more reasonable 2.6" tire which aleady fit. So, no I can't think of anything significant I'd change.






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    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    I am intrigued with the 29er Noel has coming, but I'm in no hurry to give up the Endorphin. This bike is sooo good.
    Don't give up the Endo just add the 29er.

    I kept my SC Nomad Mk2 for 9yrs. I won't be surprised if the Endo breaks that record.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  40. #40
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    I'm a bit late to the game given when this bike was released, but here is another Endo review:

    https://vikapprovedblog.wordpress.co...orphin-review/
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  41. #41
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    Good write up, no BS.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  42. #42
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    I also like the Mudhugger review. The MH is a game changer here in the wet PNW.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    I also like the Mudhugger review. The MH is a game changer here in the wet PNW.
    Thanks. Yes. I have a Mudhugger all ready to go for the Endo when I am back from AZ in late Oct. One of the best parts/accessories I ever bought.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Don't give up the Endo just add the 29er.

    I kept my SC Nomad Mk2 for 9yrs. I won't be surprised if the Endo breaks that record.
    If the new 29er replaces the Chilcotin (ie, 135-150 rear travel, 66 HA) I'll definitely keep the Endorphin. But if it ends up being 120-130 and is a 29er version of the Endorphin, then the Endo would most likely go. I'd love to have one of everything from Knolly, but I only have so many hooks in the garage.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

    www.stuckinthespokes.com

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    I'd love to have one of everything from Knolly, but I only have so many hooks in the garage.
    Buy more hooks.

    The new 29er seems targeted at the Trail market not AM/Enduro.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  46. #46
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    New Bike Review! 27.5 Endorphin

    After being back on my Chilcotin for the past 6-8 weeks waiting for some warrantied cranks, I've been back on the Endorphin for the last two mornings.
    Here's some thoughts:

    I'd about decided the Chilcotin was almost the Endo's equal as a do everything bike, and that it wasn't too slow on climbs and flatter, rolling terrain. I was wrong. The Endo totally kills it on pedal response, climbing, and maintaining momentum in rolling terrain. Sooo much faster and lighter feeling.

    I like the longer, lower and just as slack geometry on the Endo compared to the Chili, but with the recent updates to my Chili cockpit it does feel pretty modern and is comfortable and I like the side to side and smaller wheeled snappiness of it for tight technical maneuvers and twisty, chunky, steep descents (Think Portal Trail).

    Surprisingly, The MRP Stage fork and CC DB Inline felt both more plush and more responsive than the AVY cartridge Lyric fork and Avalanche Woodie coil rear shock on the Chili. I thought I had the suspension on the Chili pretty well sorted (although I wasn't totally pleased with it), but I think I need to play with things a bit more and I suspect I'm going to have to send both off to Avy to get them revalved for my weight and riding preferences (I bought them both used from riders who weighed a good 20-30 lbs more than me).

    Anyway, It's nice to step off your preferred, daily driver for awhile so when you get back on you are reminded of all the great things about it that you like.

    Still loving the Endo.

    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

    www.stuckinthespokes.com

  47. #47
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    Krob, thanks for this write-up. 'sent you a pm for some much-needed advice. TIA
    d butt u kicked today, could b d same butt you'll kiss tomorrow.....

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