Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,227

    Which lock to protect my Knolly?

    As those on the Knollfest may know, my On Guard Rottweiller heavy duty cable lock failed while I was down in Phoenix.

    No Knollies were lost in the failure of said lock but the key/lock actually failed to open almost costing me some prime riding. Now that would've been a tragedy!

    Anyway, I ended up cutting it off and with the new Chili on the way I need to replace it.

    How about the On Guard Beast. It's a hardened steel/titanium hex shaped chain and lock. 3' long. Looks to be on par with the Kryponite New York Legend 1590 referenced in another thread but a bit less money. It also has a $3500 theft insurance. Anyone have any thoughts on this one?

    The On Guard Rottreiller referenced above did defeat a bolt cutter once while I had both my bikes locked up outside a mall (Stupid, I know).
    However with the key/lock failing and having to cut it off I'm a bit nervous to go that way again. It took three hack saw blades and an hour of hard work to get through it though, so it seems like a pretty good lock for a cable. (Disclaimer: Not a professional bike theif)

    Any thoughts on the Albus Bordo 6000 reviewed here on mtbr recently? Any others folks might suggest?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: craigstr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    4,343

    Get one of these

    works better then a lock
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Which lock to protect my Knolly?-3d50.jpg  


  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    1,117
    Honestly, unless you have a great insurance policy you plan on taking care of, or a massive amount of disposable income, I would REALLY recommend not leaving it anywhere outside.

    If you have to for some camping/bike festival I'd get the best lock around (multiple locks, and no matter too bulky), but if it's just to use for riding around ect...get a beater and call it a day.

  4. #4
    %$#$*!
    Reputation: beefmagic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    644
    No experience with the Beast lock, but I've got an New York chain with an older model lock. It looks serious and is burly and heavy. But kind of a pain to haul around (unless you're hauling bikes and keep the lock in the car).

    I've been told that any lock can be broken if a thief wants it bad enough, that it's really about the deterrent. The NY lock definitely works as a deterrent. Keep in mind that the 3ft distance is pretty short and really only just gives you enough length to lock the frame up to something (which can then be the target for the thief if the lock looks like too much work to break). I'm sure you're aware that you'll likely need a thick cable or something else for the wheels.

    I don't like the keys either, too easy to lose, but I haven't seen any combination locks that look worthy. I always keep extra keys in another close and safe location in the event I lose the first set.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    269
    The chain looks a lot stronger than any car bike rack... If I wanted to steal your bike, I'd just saws all the rack.

    That being said, I would employ a combination of a U lock and a cable plus nice pad lock. Defeating two different locking systems is exponentially more of a pain than one.

  6. #6
    TSC
    TSC is offline
    Buehliever
    Reputation: TSC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    872
    I've done a lot of thinking about this as I often travel with multiple bikes, so typically one bike is locked up and unattended. Right or wrong, here's my philosophy:

    Thief Profiles:
    1) Thieves who want a toy.
    2) Thieves who want to sell your bike.
    3) Thieves who are bikers.

    The first type of thief wants your whole bike. Only an educated subset of the second type of thieves knows the value of individual bike components so they will typically want the whole bike too. The third subset scares me the most, as they are the most likely to steal individual parts (e.g. a dropper seat post or wheels) that are not secured.

    Theft Deterrents:
    - You want to limit the time a thief can spend undetected while breaking your security system; so park in high-traffic places where your bike is visible, but not in a location that invites vandalism (e.g. park in a parking lot park where cars driving in an out can see your bikes, but not where kids walk by them).
    - Theft deterrents are only as good as the weakest link.
    - Multiple theft deterrents are better than one.
    - Empathy.

    My Implementation:
    Personally, I use multiple long cables that I run through every part of my bike(s) that I can; and I hook them to my vehicle frame with quality lock(s). I sometimes use a u-lock to hook two bikes together because then the thief needs a pickup. And, when possible, I drive one of my older, beater vehicles as it's a lot easier for people to "justify" stealing from someone they believe is wealthy.
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,961
    Quote Originally Posted by TSC View Post
    - Empathy.
    Irrelevant, they're thieves.
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  8. #8
    BC
    BC is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    835
    All you can do is slow them down. I use a big ass chain and combo lock if I'm only going to be a few minutes, or when I can visually see my bike if I'm at a rest. etc. If it's going to be out of my site for very long. I'll take the wheels off and shove it inside my truck. Out of site is the best way. If they don't know it's there, they won't steal it. A portable plasma cutter can get through anything in a matter of seconds, not that many thieves are that sophisticated.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,537
    most of the cycle specific chains are hollow link to keep the weight down and make them easier to carry. unfortunatly this also make them easier to cut. with a decent size set of bolt cutters these hollow link locks can be cut within seconds.
    what you need is a hardend steel solid link chain. these are alot heavier to carry but are almost impossible to cut with standard tools. i know of 2 goos comanies that make decent quality chains, they aint cheap and the are a little on the heavy side for carrying, but who cares if it keeps your pride and joy safe.
    check out this site, lots of great info and products for sale, also watch the videos, and see how good the so called good locks really are.
    Almax Security Chains Limited

    these guys also do some really good chains for reasonable prices.
    Protector Police-Approved and Sold Secure-Approved Security Chains direct from Pragmasis, the manufacturer

  10. #10
    TSC
    TSC is offline
    Buehliever
    Reputation: TSC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    872
    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    Irrelevant, they're thieves.
    Your reply suggests a belief that all people who steal suffer from psychopathy. Psychologists will tell you that isn't the case. If you're interested in enlightening yourself, you can easily find scholarly articles about theft and how people rationalize it. If you're really interested here's a book specifically about the topic: Why Honest People Shoplift or Commit Other Acts of Theft.

    Suggestion: When someone says something that doesn't fit your preconceived beliefs, instead of stopping your thought process at "What a dumbass...", force yourself to consider the possibility that he/she might have some insight that you don't; then ask yourself: "I wonder why he/she wrote/said that? What insight could I be overlooking?" This little practice will help you become more enlightened if you seek the answer. Give it a try. If you succeed you will lean a lot; you will write/say less derogatory comments; AND people will have a higher opinion of you.
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,961
    Quote Originally Posted by TSC View Post
    Your reply suggests a belief that all people who steal suffer from psychopathy. Psychologists will tell you that isn't the case. If you're interested in enlightening yourself, you can easily find scholarly articles about theft and how people rationalize it. If you're really interested here's a book specifically about the topic: Why Honest People Shoplift or Commit Other Acts of Theft.

    Suggestion: When someone says something that doesn't fit your preconceived beliefs, instead of stopping your thought process at "What a dumbass...", force yourself to consider the possibility that he/she might have some insight that you don't; then ask yourself: "I wonder why he/she wrote/said that? What insight could I be overlooking?" This little practice will help you become more enlightened if you seek the answer. Give it a try. If you succeed you will lean a lot; you will write/say less derogatory comments; AND people will have a higher opinion of you.
    Thanks for the laugh, that was excellent!
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,961
    Quote Originally Posted by LAKESNAKE View Post
    All you can do is slow them down. I use a big ass chain and combo lock if I'm only going to be a few minutes, or when I can visually see my bike if I'm at a rest. etc. If it's going to be out of my site for very long. I'll take the wheels off and shove it inside my truck. Out of site is the best way. If they don't know it's there, they won't steal it. A portable plasma cutter can get through anything in a matter of seconds, not that many thieves are that sophisticated.
    Damn, some of those portable cutters have 20' lines. Rape van, generator, cutter, could clean out a shop in a couple minutes.....if you ever break bad, Austin is in serious trouble!
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •