Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    destination unknown
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,515

    Endo Shakedown Stoke [oo]<

    I got out to ride the new Endorphin today. I did my go-to loop when testing anything new. It's about 10 miles with 2000' of climbing. The terrain is rocky, loose over hardpack desert singletrack. Traction up and down will be tested. Here's the video my nephew shot following me on some of the descents. He's riding along on a SC Nomad.



    As far as first impressions go the bike shined on the descents. I felt comfortable about halfway through but didn't get super comfortable, its a first ride after all. The Endo climbed pretty well too. I set it up with about 33% sag, 6 clicks of R from full closed and ran the shock in D the whole time

  2. #2
    Powered by ice cream.
    Reputation: Enel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    6,263
    How did it climb? It is fun watching vids after riding with someone as I have a much better feel for how you ride.
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  3. #3
    destination unknown
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,515
    Quote Originally Posted by Enel View Post
    How did it climb? It is fun watching vids after riding with someone as I have a much better feel for how you ride.
    Yeah, enel it was good to ride with you. Sedona was killer

    It climbed like a scalded goat on crack

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,922
    Nice. Looks like it can handle a fair amount of chunkiness just fine.

    I'd be interested in your comparisons wtih your dw 5 Spot.

  5. #5
    destination unknown
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,515
    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Nice. Looks like it can handle a fair amount of chunkiness just fine.

    I'd be interested in your comparisons wtih your dw 5 Spot.
    Here are some first impressions. I can tell the Endo will be a very capable descender equal to or better than the Spot. It ate up the moderate rocks very smoothly which made for a solid, stable ride. I really liked the suspension feel going down. Anyone with concerns about its descending prowess shouldn't worry -- this bike is plenty. IMO I'd be way over biked on a Chili for where I ride most. The bike felt stiff and held all the off camber lines great. Climbing as my Endo is setup (same fork, stem length, tires as Spot) gives up some ground in terms of efficiency and traction. I broke traction out of the saddle quite a few times which had me rattled a little. I have some dialing-in that needs to be done and I need to lower the fork 10mm to 150 which should help going up and down. The front felt a little tall at times but it didn't lift on steep climbs. I'm already running a pretty low stack so the bike must have been wallowing a little I think. I didn't get full travel but the rear end never felt harsh. Since I kept the shock in D the entire ride there was some pedal bob that wasn't too bad but it did suck some extra energy -- I'm just not used to it coming from a DW bike. With tuning, adjusting my position on the bike, and adapting to the 4x4 I should be able to improve the climbing without sacrificing the DH. However, I'm not sure it will ever be as efficient as the Spot without running the shock in climb mode but I may be wrong. Overall, the bike is way cool and is definitely a gravity junky's trail bike

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,922
    Quote Originally Posted by LncNuvue View Post
    Here are some first impressions. I can tell the Endo will be a very capable descender equal to or better than the Spot. It ate up the moderate rocks very smoothly which made for a solid, stable ride. I really liked the suspension feel going down. Anyone with concerns about its descending prowess shouldn't worry -- this bike is plenty. IMO I'd be way over biked on a Chili for where I ride most. The bike felt stiff and held all the off camber lines great. Climbing as my Endo is setup (same fork, stem length, tires as Spot) gives up some ground in terms of efficiency and traction. I broke traction out of the saddle quite a few times which had me rattled a little. I have some dialing-in that needs to be done and I need to lower the fork 10mm to 150 which should help going up and down. The front felt a little tall at times but it didn't lift on steep climbs. I'm already running a pretty low stack so the bike must have been wallowing a little I think. I didn't get full travel but the rear end never felt harsh. Since I kept the shock in D the entire ride there was some pedal bob that wasn't too bad but it did suck some extra energy -- I'm just not used to it coming from a DW bike. With tuning, adjusting my position on the bike, and adapting to the 4x4 I should be able to improve the climbing without sacrificing the DH. However, I'm not sure it will ever be as efficient as the Spot without running the shock in climb mode but I may be wrong. Overall, the bike is way cool and is definitely a gravity junky's trail bike
    Thanks for the insights. Yeah, knowing what they consider "XC" up in North Van I'm not surprised it descends well and handles some pretty agressive trail.

    Probably really all I need for 90 percent of the trails I ride locally too..... but I know I'm goiong to want more for the trips to Moab, BC, Phoenix etc so am still leaning towards the Chili.

    Surprised about the rear traction issue. That's usually one of the 4x4's strong points. I noticed more slippage on my dw Spot (at first) but have adapted my climbing style a bit and it's generally an non-issue now.

  7. #7
    destination unknown
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,515
    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Surprised about the rear traction issue. That's usually one of the 4x4's strong points. I noticed more slippage on my dw Spot (at first) but have adapted my climbing style a bit and it's generally an non-issue now.
    Yeah, it's a head scratcher. I think I'm just so dialed into the Spot. The way the linkages work under pedal load is practically polar opposite.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bionicman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    510
    the traction issue will be solved with a few clicks of rebound - on my chili I can affect climbing traction by as little as 2 clicks

  9. #9
    destination unknown
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,515
    Quote Originally Posted by bionicman View Post
    the traction issue will be solved with a few clicks of rebound - on my chili I can affect climbing traction by as little as 2 clicks
    Thanks. Right now I'm one click slow from the middle or 6 from closed on the Fox Float CTD. I will try 5 from closed for tomorrow's ride.

  10. #10
    Powered by ice cream.
    Reputation: Enel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    6,263
    Quote Originally Posted by LncNuvue View Post
    Yeah, it's a head scratcher. I think I'm just so dialed into the Spot. The way the linkages work under pedal load is practically polar opposite.
    I think it is because the Spot is simply a superior ride in every way.

    I personally find a Jones has the best pedalling platform out there, regardless of shock.
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  11. #11
    Knollician
    Reputation: tiSS'er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,259
    Quote Originally Posted by LncNuvue View Post
    Thanks. Right now I'm one click slow from the middle or 6 from closed on the Fox Float CTD. I will try 5 from closed for tomorrow's ride.
    Not sure about the CDT, but Knolly specs low compression and low rebound tunes on their shocks. I was running my RP23 2 clicks from fully closed. I think a medium rebound tune would be a better option for our type of terrain.
    "Three balls at once...who knew?" - Cotton McKnight

  12. #12
    destination unknown
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,515
    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er View Post
    Not sure about the CDT, but Knolly specs low compression and low rebound tunes on their shocks. I was running my RP23 2 clicks from fully closed. I think a medium rebound tune would be a better option for our type of terrain.
    Thanks for the input. I added two clicks of R damping for this mornings ride. Which reduced the pedal bob quite a bit and helped the traction. That adjustment firmed up the shock on the DH slightly but it still felt pretty good. I also lower the stack 5mm and went to a 70mm stem which felt better. I'm moving in the right direction

    Endo Shakedown Stoke [oo]&lt;-endobump.jpg

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bionicman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    510
    Quote Originally Posted by LncNuvue View Post
    Thanks for the input. I added two clicks of R damping for this mornings ride. Which reduced the pedal bob quite a bit and helped the traction. That adjustment firmed up the shock on the DH slightly but it still felt pretty good. I also lower the stack 5mm and went to a 70mm stem which felt better. I'm moving in the right direction

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	EndoBump.jpg 
Views:	474 
Size:	405.7 KB 
ID:	738888


    I've found on my Chilcotin that 2 clicks of rebound & 1 click of HS/LS compression change the way the vehicle behaves drastically to the point I almost need a tune for going up & a tune for going down

    so I've almost come up with a compromise for both as I prefer to ride when I do not work on the bike trail side

    this is a testament to Noel's suspension design as the Chilcotin is the only bike I've ridden that you can change the attitude of the vehicle (so drastically) with such small adjustments

    keep clicking away & keep notes so you dont get lost in adjustments

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bullit_cn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,476
    When you guys say add a click,
    Are you referring from full open or from full close setting
    Thanks, Just digesting some additional knowledge from your experiments
    When trails gets tougher, Just stand up and deliver.

  15. #15
    destination unknown
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,515
    Quote Originally Posted by Bullit_cn View Post
    When you guys say add a click,
    Are you referring from full open or from full close setting
    When I add a click of rebound I'm going toward closed - adding dampening.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bullit_cn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,476
    Thanks LncNuvue, Well understood
    I've ask as I always start setting from full open then add clicks to achieve my preference
    Just benchmarking my setup
    When trails gets tougher, Just stand up and deliver.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bionicman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    510
    First you need to understand what is going on inside a shock

    You always always start damping settings from fully closed, maximum or + condition
    It is more accurate to measure from a wall vs fully open damping circuit - the last few negative clicks may or may not have an effect depending on manufacturing tolerances
    Once a orfice is open you can no longer affect damping it is at its maximum flow rate

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    185
    Quote Originally Posted by bionicman View Post
    First you need to understand what is going on inside a shock

    You always always start damping settings from fully closed, maximum or + condition
    It is more accurate to measure from a wall vs fully open damping circuit - the last few negative clicks may or may not have an effect depending on manufacturing tolerances
    Once a orfice is open you can no longer affect damping it is at its maximum flow rate
    I hear what you are saying, but I do the opposite. My logic is that you figure out the sag on the bike, then with everything open, it will be the most plush but will blow through the travel too easily. I then add compression so I don't bottom hard on big hits and then add rebound until it doesn't feel like it is bucking. IF you are running a Double Barrel or another shock with low speed compression, I then add enough low speed to get the amount of bob to a level I am happy with.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bullit_cn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,476
    Quote Originally Posted by bionicman View Post
    First you need to understand what is going on inside a shock
    Very good point, thank you
    You can then setup from either direction and get your preferred settings.
    I do the opposite though similar to BryanS.
    When trails gets tougher, Just stand up and deliver.

  20. #20
    No known cure
    Reputation: Vader's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,680
    You said you ran the shock in D. What does this mean? Debound? Decompression? Is it airshock talk?
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  21. #21
    destination unknown
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,515
    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    You said you ran the shock in D. What does this mean? Debound? Decompression? Is it airshock talk?
    It's the new Fox Float CTD shock. D = Descend, similar to Open/Pro-Pedal Off on an RP23.

    CTD is an acronym for Climb / Trail / Descend, the 3 main settings found on the shock.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •