Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 75

Thread: Droppers?

  1. #1
    Pivoteer
    Reputation: tiSS'er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,435

    Droppers?

    OK, I'm sure this has been hashed out before, but I have always ignored the conversations as I have never been interested. I think that droppers are finally getting to the point of being reasonably reliable and have most of the slop issues resolved. So here are the 3 I would potentially be interested in.

    LEV - I like the fixed cable routing, and the remote, simple and clever. However I have been reading that the internal cable is prone to breaking, as is the small clip that attaches the remote cable to the internal cable. As I understand this is not user serviceable.

    Thomson - Love Thomson products, the only drawback I see is the cable mounting. But how big of a deal is it really? Seems like it might be the most reliable post, but with some annoying cable issues

    Reverb - The one I saw in person was totally ratted out, and there was a ton of saddle slop. Like the idea of the hydro remote, but it seems rather large and frail.

    How has your experience been? I know the Thomson is not yet available but it looks like it might be the nicest of the 3.
    Employed by Pivot Cycles - www.pivotcycles.com

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Buzz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    971
    The cable issue is a deal breaker for me. I cant stand the loop that it creates when the seat is dropped. It either rubs your leg or gets caught on something. I hadn't heard of these LEV issues, but it will most likely be my next dropper post. The Thomson isnt even out yet, so no judgments cant be made on it quite yet. They definitely missed the boat on the cable placement. Coming in late to the game as they did, they should have mounted it at the collar. The Reverb and LEV are the top two in my opinion. I currently run a gravity dropper, and while it isnt the prettiest, it is by far the most reliable of any of the dropper posts, and it doesnt have cable loop issues.

  3. #3
    Competent User
    Reputation: Mr.Quint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    612

    Droppers?

    I haven't noticed my Reverb cable once. It's out of the way as far as I'm concerned when riding.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cerebroside's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    925
    I have a 2012 Reverb, had it for almost a year. The moving line hasn't been an issue for me since I coil it around the seat tube; it doesn't get in the way when you drop it.

    Reliability has been alright I guess (no ride-stopping failures). If I bought another one I would go for the Lev, mostly for cable activation (over hydraulic) and the grip integrated remote.
    Mine doesn't have any noticeable slop, but you are right that the remote is fragile and difficult to fit comfortably with other controls. It also seems to let air into the system whenever I use it, but I've gotten used to the mushy feel.
    Post also has a slow leak in the airspring, but that is apparently user fixable. I just pump it up every few weeks.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rscecil007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,460
    I got a Reverb towards the end of the first year they came out (this was the summer before the first batch Chilcotins were delivered in the fall.) Failed once towards the end of a ride. SRAM repaired under warranty. Was all good for about a month then quit mid-ride one day, thankfully it was stuck up and just wouldn't go down, so I could pedal out. SRAM just replaced it with a brand new one, since it'd already been back once. I promptly sold it, and also sold the 2nd one I'd picked up on a good deal that was sitting in the parts box waiting on the Chilicotin. Also found them annoying to bleed. Not hard, just annoying. I also didn't like the non-fixed cable routing. I managed to get it out of the way, but it just looks like it's asking to catch something and get ripped off IMHO.

    I now have a Lev on the Chili, had it about 6 weeks or so, love it so far. Very smooth action, the integrated lever is nice. There's a tad bit of side to side play, but rock solid front to back. Every dropper I've seen has a wee bit of play. I don't notice this at all when riding. And of course the fixed cable play is a plus. I think the internal cable snapping was only on the first ones that hit the market, I read where they resolved that issue. I've not heard of the connector clip having problems.

    My ridding buddy (Cheezwhip here on the forum) is waiting for the Thomson. I'm guessing it will be bombproof. I think they are just shipping now though. The stealth version is due out in a few months I think, but not that we can route it that way on the Chili (easily anyway.)

    Bikebling.com is about the cheapest I've found, they have they priced lower than anyone else I've found, and there's a 15% off coupon floating around as well. Email me if you can't find it and I'll try to dig it up.

    I waited a long time to jump on the dropper post bandwagon. I have to say, they really do make riding more enjoyable.
    If jackasses could fly this place would be an airport.

  6. #6
    Pivoteer
    Reputation: tiSS'er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,435
    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    I got a Reverb towards the end of the first year they came out (this was the summer before the first batch Chilcotins were delivered in the fall.) Failed once towards the end of a ride. SRAM repaired under warranty. Was all good for about a month then quit mid-ride one day, thankfully it was stuck up and just wouldn't go down. SRAM just replaced it with a brand new one, since it'd already been back once. I promptly sold it, and also sold the 2nd one I'd picked up on a good deal that was sitting in the Chilcotin parts box. Also found them annoying to bleed. Not hard, just annoying. I also didn't like the non-fixed cable routing. I managed to get it out of the way, but it just looks like it's asking to catch something and get ripped off IMHO.

    I now have a Lev on the Chili, had it about 6 weeks or so, love it so far. Very smooth action, the integrated lever is nice. There's a tad bit of side to side play, but rock solid front to back. Every dropper I've seen has a wee bit of play. I don't notice this at all when riding. And of course the fixed cable play is a plus. I think the internal cable snapping was only on the first ones that hit the market, I read where they resolved that issue. I've not heard of the connector clip having problems.

    My ridding buddy (Cheezwhip here on the forum) is waiting for the Thomson. I'm guessing it will be bombproof. I think they are just shipping now though. The stealth version is due out in a few months I think, but not that we can route it that way on the Chili (easily anyway.)

    Bikebling.com is about the cheapest I've found, they have they priced lower than anyone else I've found, and there's a 15% off coupon floating around as well. Email me if you can't find it and I'll try to dig it up.

    I waited a long time to jump on the dropper post bandwagon. I have to say, they really do make riding more enjoyable.
    Thanks for info Ryan. If I do go this route, I think the LEV would be the best choice. I am super finicky about my cabling, so a fixed cable would be great. Looks like I will have to go with a 125. The only problem I see is that if I like it, I would need another for the Endo I do like the LEV remote as well.
    Employed by Pivot Cycles - www.pivotcycles.com

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rscecil007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,460
    I think you would like it, and yes you will need two of them. Haha. I also had to do 125. I waited forever for the 150, only to realize thanks to TSC's post that the 150 wouldn't work for me. I still think it's plenty of drop though.
    If jackasses could fly this place would be an airport.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,827
    Another vote for the LEV - been really happy with mine (also was a fan of my i950, but like the fact that the LEVS cable does not move).

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    305
    Also consider the Specialized Command Post Blacklite. Not infinitely adjustable, but much more simple and dealer serviceable. MSRP is $285, so cheaper than most. It has a little bit of set back, so weigh this into fitment. Only gripe I have is the single bolt saddle saddle rail clamp.

    As far as 100mm vs 125mm vs 150mm, I prefer 125 to retain more control of bike position via saddle.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: F.N.G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,447
    I have the Lev and it is great. My internal cable came off like you mentioned. It is, actually, user-able to fix. I sent it in to get fixed but once I had already sent it in, I saw a video on how to service the Levs and during the re-assembly, it shows how to attach that internal cable. You can simply do that part if it happens to you.

  11. #11
    Pivoteer
    Reputation: tiSS'er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,435
    Quote Originally Posted by F.N.G View Post
    I have the Lev and it is great. My internal cable came off like you mentioned. It is, actually, user-able to fix. I sent it in to get fixed but once I had already sent it in, I saw a video on how to service the Levs and during the re-assembly, it shows how to attach that internal cable. You can simply do that part if it happens to you.
    Thanks, that is some good info.
    Employed by Pivot Cycles - www.pivotcycles.com

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rscecil007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,460
    lev install

    Good Lev install video here by KS, and I think the service one is linked there also.
    If jackasses could fly this place would be an airport.

  13. #13
    Perpetual Hack
    Reputation: mykel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1,976
    Have an early first run Reverb - like before most shops had seen one.
    Has been stellar, except for the time I had a nasty crash and tore off the hydro line from the remote.
    New hose and barb, a bleed and it has been good since.
    Still nice and tight - minimal head movement.
    I have never had any issues with the cable getting caught on anything ( its on my Delirium )
    Maybe not the most aesthetically pleasing, but so far no use issues.

    I would like a 150mm stealth version though...

    michael
    A Dirtbag since 1969
    A Knomer since 2007

    Knolly Podium
    Knolly Delirium
    Knolly Endorphin

  14. #14
    TSC
    TSC is offline
    Buehliever
    Reputation: TSC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    873
    The LEV is easy to install and how it works is fairly intuitive. Be aware that possibly* there are variations of the remote clamps (ODI compatible or not) and if the "inline cable tension adjuster" comes pre-installed.

    The ODI mating clamp isn't a big deal but it does save a bit of space if you use ODI compatible grips. The "inline cable tension adjuster" is well-done, but unnecessary IMO; and is a place for dirt to enter the system so I would leave it out if it doesn't come pre-installed. You can always add it later if you want.

    Edit: you could always seal the cable tension assembly because you won't use it except if there is a problem.

    *The 125 LEV I bought last year didn't have the "inline cable tension adjuster" pre-installed. I didn't install it because the LEV works fine without it. The 150 LEV my LBS bought from Knolly had the "inline cable tension adjuster" pre-installed, but it didn't have the remote end-clamp that mates with ODI grips (I'm an OURY grip fan) so I used the old cable.
    Last edited by TSC; 05-02-2013 at 09:46 PM.
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,315
    I've had the original Maverick Speedball, The Joplin 4, the KS i950R, the Reverb (x 2), and now the KS Lev 150.

    I liked the reverb and if I could get it with the stealth mode and150mm of travel I would like it as well as the new Lev 150. Reliability has been pretty good with my Reverb. The first one failed after 6 months of hard use (internal air seal leak) but RockShox replaced the whole thing and it was going strong after another 7 months when I sold it. The Lev solves my only two minor annoyances with my Reverb: It has long enough travel to go from slammed to full pedalling extension without adjusting it in the seat collar, and the cable attaches down at the base so no cable loop movement (although that was never a big issue as far as function.... it just didn't look tidy).

    So far then, I like the Lev best. Long term reliability is still a question mark as I've only had it a couple months. The action is smooth, there's no play vertically, very little if any play side to side, it doesn't extend when you lift the bike by the seat when it's slammed, and the remote is easy to activate and easy to put in perfect position either with the odi lock-on grip integrated collar or with a separate collar.

    The only glitch I've found so far will never be a concern for you: It is slow returning when it's very cold out (below 30 deg F) and if any moisture gets in the cable housing the cable will stick/freeze and not return sometimes.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

    www.stuckinthespokes.com

  16. #16
    Ninja Master Powers
    Reputation: DWill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    516
    I've had my i950R for about three years with zero issue. I'm switching to the Thomson because, well, it's a Thomson. But the KS is staying with me for a while after I make the switch.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vapezilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    230

    Droppers?

    Quote Originally Posted by B Gillespie View Post
    Also consider the Specialized Command Post Blacklite. Not infinitely adjustable, but much more simple and dealer serviceable. MSRP is $285, so cheaper than most. It has a little bit of set back, so weigh this into fitment. Only gripe I have is the single bolt saddle saddle rail clamp.

    As far as 100mm vs 125mm vs 150mm, I prefer 125 to retain more control of bike position via saddle.
    I have the command post and I like it. The only issue I have is mounting the remote because the 90% bend noodle gets in the way so I have it in between brake and shifter which makes the remote high and hard to hit sometimes in a quick situation but I've learned to deal with it. Also the side to side play on mine after about 6 months is about 2mm so not noticeable while riding. I am thinking I getting the lev or the Thompson.

    Has anybody heard anything about the fox D.O.S.S.?

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Calhoun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,001
    I have had my Reverb for two years, three bikes. No problems ever. Yeah the cable is annoying but it has never been a functional problem. I wish I knew how this was pulled-off:



    I am anxiously awaiting the Thomson reviews. If it were not for that post coming out I would probably get a Lev. Not just for the fixed cable but for the 150mm travel. My only niggle about the Lev is how the cable exits the lever.

    Seeing pics like this doesn't help:
    "Mi amor Nuevo Miércoles!"

    -cabra cadabra

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rscecil007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,460
    A v-brake noodle coming out of the lever fixes that, it's what I used after seeing a pic on the interwebs. If I can remember I will snap a pic tonight when I get home and post it.
    If jackasses could fly this place would be an airport.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: string's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,551
    Just wait for the mythical Thompson blue tooth stealth dropper post... Sure you will have to carry a battery and pull your i-phone out to drop your post; but no cables. Plus with a little creativity you could drop your buddies post for him at a whim. Even better... since everybody will have smart phones out for their post there should be more riding pictures. I see a win..win..win!

    FWIW I have the Kronolog. I like the lever under the bar with a 1x9/10/11 drive-train and the fact the cable doesn't move too much, but its been warrantied twice in a year. They sent me a new post this last round. (first ride on new post this afternoon). They have tried to tweak the set up issues but the clamping jaws seem to be a good idea that doesn't work for the long term. I'll keep mine till the 2 year warranty runs out then move on. Crankbrothers customer service is solid and they have lots of practice warrantying their dropper posts.

    I have yet to have a dropper post that didn't have to go in at least once a year (had a KSI900 for a few years).

  21. #21
    Pivoteer
    Reputation: tiSS'er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,435
    So close to pulling the trigger....I hate the thought of having to buy 2 though
    Employed by Pivot Cycles - www.pivotcycles.com

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rscecil007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,460
    Yeah, really sucks to have two Knollys. I truly feel for you.
    If jackasses could fly this place would be an airport.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: string's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,551
    Two won't guarantee up time. However....

    It is good practice to go back to a fixed post for a few weeks every 8-12 months. It makes you remember things like getting behind the seat, proper body position, how to properly endo over the bars because your post didn't drop at the push of a button because it doesn't have a button, and it lets your thumb rest after pushing a button 50 times a ride. It also is a good time to weight your bike to marvel at how light it is with out that heavy post and how uncluttered your bar is. You might even consider a front derailleur to compensate for the lack of cables for those few weeks.

    It also gives you time to look at the newer crop of posts that are incrementally better than the one you have and may or may not be more reliable.

    You can also take up hiking if nothing else works.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: thedeathstar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    71
    I wish I'd never gotten one, because it is so awesome yet such a pain at the same time, but I'll never be able to go back.

    I have a joplin 4, and I've had it repaired twice in a one year period. I just now got it back so I'll have to see how well it does.

  25. #25
    TSC
    TSC is offline
    Buehliever
    Reputation: TSC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    873
    Quote Originally Posted by Calhoun View Post
    Seeing pics like this doesn't help:
    The cable is quite stiff so if you insist that it turns abruptly then you probably would have to do something like that. But it's not an ungodly sight if you just let it bend gradually.

    Name:  IMG_0081.JPG
Views: 776
Size:  88.2 KB

    IMO, the biggest drawback is that I want to the activation button where my front click shifter is located. (If my grip-shifter hadn't had a problem with premature deactivation--would exit the big ring at slightest touch--then it would be awesome!)
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

  26. #26
    TSC
    TSC is offline
    Buehliever
    Reputation: TSC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    873
    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er View Post
    So close to pulling the trigger....I hate the thought of having to buy 2 though
    If this will make it easier, I've got a gently used LEV 125mm that has a new cable I am planning on listing for $275. I could take a bit off of that for you (to reciprocate in all your Knollifest planning); and if you found that my LEV was not in satisfactory condition you could send it back. If you're interested PM me.
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

  27. #27
    Pivoteer
    Reputation: tiSS'er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,435
    Quote Originally Posted by TSC View Post
    If this will make it easier, I've got a gently used LEV 125mm that has a new cable I am planning on listing for $275. I could take a bit off of that for you (to reciprocate in all your Knollifest planning); and if you found that my LEV was not in satisfactory condition you could send it back. If you're interested PM me.
    Thanks, I'll let you know. I need a 125 as the 150 won't fit. However, my wife has gotten in on the Knollfest planning, and I may to set aside a bit of cash for this years' event She came up with some great ideas for trophies!
    Employed by Pivot Cycles - www.pivotcycles.com

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,653
    Another post to consider: the new Gravity Dropper LP, now available in 31.6 without shims, 5 inch drop and I-Beam version to save weight with plenty of adjustment. Fugly boot can removed if that bothers you.

  29. #29
    TSC
    TSC is offline
    Buehliever
    Reputation: TSC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    873
    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er View Post
    Thanks, I'll let you know. I need a 125 as the 150 won't fit. However, my wife has gotten in on the Knollfest planning, and I may to set aside a bit of cash for this years' event She came up with some great ideas for trophies!
    I'm in no hurry. I bought the 125 at the end of last year because the 150 wasn't available. I spent less time on it that you spend on your bike in a week. The 150 became available during the winter so I put it on during the off-season (a term probably not to familiar with).

    When I set the extended 125mm for my preferred maximum riding height and then drop the post all the way it's like having a regular seat post set at 2" above slammed. I can still get behind my saddle easy enough but the seat is still up enough that I can use it as leverage point for my thighs. With the 150 I can lower my seat another inch, so I have less worry about catching baggy shorts on my saddle, but I have very little riding time with my seat this low (no DJ in my history); so, who knows, with a bit more saddle time maybe I'll be selling my 150 instead.
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: F.N.G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,447
    Bottom line, you need at least one dropper for the Chilco. Endo, you can get away with a standard post. With an all mountain badass rig like the chilco, it is a MUST. The only, and i mean ONLY, concern one should have with a dropper is weight. Doesn't matter if you need to "remember" how to ride a bike on a standard post. It is not needed. Like saying we need to stick with old non remote TVs to make us "remember" what it was like to watch tv old style... What?
    Dropper post on Chilco-an absolute must....Get it and the first review of it will be "can't believe i waited this long without one..."

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,315
    Quote Originally Posted by F.N.G View Post
    Doesn't matter if you need to "remember" how to ride a bike on a standard post. It is not needed.
    Not so sure about that. I had my brand new Lev 150 stick in the up position at the top of an hour long climb this afternoon. No amount of futzing around with it on top of the mountain would convince it to drop and I had to ride down a pretty gnarly DH run with the post totally jacked up.

    Talk about awkward! I use to ride like this all the time but I felt like a fish out of water and even had to walk a couple not-that-tricky sections because I was afraid.

    I shoulda shut my big pie hole when I said mine was functioning fine. D'Oh!

    KRob------> Studying the KS rebuild video.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

    www.stuckinthespokes.com

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rscecil007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,460
    Krob, has the cable stretched any, did you try to tighten it up with the adjustment barrel?
    If jackasses could fly this place would be an airport.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: F.N.G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,447
    "Premature deactivation"... Awesome TSC!!!!

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,315
    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    Krob, has the cable stretched any, did you try to tighten it up with the adjustment barrel?
    It felt like the lever/cable was stuck, so I took the cover off the actuating mechanism and pushed it down with a allen wrench until it was moving freely and then the cable was moving fine so it wasn't the cable. But even with the actuating mechanism pushed all the way down, the seat wouldn't budge.

    I'm thinking that maybe the internal cable came loose. How do you tell?
    Last edited by KRob; 05-03-2013 at 09:19 PM.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

    www.stuckinthespokes.com

  35. #35
    Outcast
    Reputation: Renegade's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    8,565
    tiSS'er, it wasn't one of your three choices. I have owned, and still own, three gravity droppers since the day they first came out, and I have owned a reverb. ANY hydraulic post will never be as reliable or as low maintenance as a GD post. Yes, the hydro posts have less slop, and infinite positions, but they are far more complex. I have enough bike maintenance to do without bleeding and replacing hydro components. My 2 cents.
    ****

  36. #36
    TSC
    TSC is offline
    Buehliever
    Reputation: TSC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    873
    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    It felt like the lever/cable was stuck, so I took the cover off the actuating mechanism and pushed it down with a allen wrench until it was moving freely and then the cable was moving fine so it wasn't the cable. But even with the actuating mechanism pushed all the way down, the seat wouldn't budge.

    I'm thinking that maybe the internal cable came loose. How do you tell?
    Speaking out my butt (because I've never watched the rebuild video), but if the actuating mechanism returned to the up position (i.e. was pulled up by the internal cable) then I'm guessing that it did not come loose. I've heard that you can create a bind that will stop the post from functioning. This is usually done by over-tightening the seat collar. Your climbing may have torqued the seat post a bit. Try loosening the seat collar (maybe even making it loose enough to slide the post out) and see if that fixes it.
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,315
    Quote Originally Posted by TSC View Post
    Speaking out my butt (because I've never watched the rebuild video), but if the actuating mechanism returned to the up position (i.e. was pulled up by the internal cable) then I'm guessing that it did not come loose. I've heard that you can create a bind that will stop the post from functioning. This is usually done by over-tightening the seat collar. Your climbing may have torqued the seat post a bit. Try loosening the seat collar (maybe even making it loose enough to slide the post out) and see if that fixes it.
    No, I think you're on to something. After I got home I took the seat post off the bike and was going to pull it apart and I noticed that the cam that connects to the internal kevlar cord was still connected and when I pulled down on it definitely was attached to something so I worked back and forth a bit, shortened the cable a bit just to be sure and put it back together. Worked fine.

    Your idea of it binding describes what I was feeling when I first pushed the lever. Not sure if my seat collar was too tight but who knows. Could be that. Strange.....
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

    www.stuckinthespokes.com

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rscecil007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,460
    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    A v-brake noodle coming out of the lever fixes that, it's what I used after seeing a pic on the interwebs. If I can remember I will snap a pic tonight when I get home and post it.
    Here's a shot of my setup:

    Droppers?-imag0142.jpg
    If jackasses could fly this place would be an airport.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: F.N.G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,447
    Looks pretty clean to me.

  40. #40
    Pivoteer
    Reputation: tiSS'er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,435
    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    Here's a shot of my setup:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMAG0142.jpg 
Views:	162 
Size:	120.2 KB 
ID:	796171
    Is there a reason you can't make a tighter loop with the cable housing?
    Employed by Pivot Cycles - www.pivotcycles.com

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rscecil007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,460
    Eh, sorta, it really depends on what the cable wants to do, you know they can have a mind of their own.

    I have one on my hardtail I got used that doesn't have the v-brake noodle, and it's fine, but def sticks out more than the setup pictured on my Chili. I prefer using the noodle so it's nice and mimics the brake hose bend, etc. What you can't see is just out of the picture (forgot to include this, sorry) I have a zip tie around the Lev hose and my front bake hose.
    If jackasses could fly this place would be an airport.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nybike1971's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,875

    Droppers?

    My experience has been the following:

    - Gravity Dropper: by far the most reliable option. It's an old design, it's ugly, it develops play but it just works day in and day out and does not require almost any maintenance. I have had one since 2006 and after they replaced the inner tube in 2008 I think I have replaced the cable once.

    - Reverb: it has the smoothest action. The actuation is flawless when the lines are clear of air. It needs periodic bleeds to keep it running well, not a big deal but it's definitely another maintenance item. The first gen Reverb was unreliable and mine lasted only a few rides. Rockshox replaced it with a 2013 which so far has been good. While shipping the bike, the barb snapped. I was able to hold it together with some rape enough to get through a trip last Fall. The loop of hydro line from the saddle is a but annoying but it's not terrible.

    - LEV: the LEV is very smooth, great action but it doesn't really use the full length of the available shaft consistently. When pushed down it bounces back about an inch. I have a 150mm model and on a normal seat drop I can usually get about 120mm after it bounces back. If I sit on it for a few seconds with the remote engaged it's better than that. The cable is pretty stiff and the loop around the handlebar tends to be a bit long. The attachment of the cable to the seatpost is a bit fragile. The plastic barb that keeps everything in place is a joke and I recommend always having a spare one handy. Even with the flaws, this one is probably my favorite.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    194
    Quote Originally Posted by nybike1971 View Post
    - LEV: the LEV is very smooth, great action but it doesn't really use the full length of the available shaft consistently. When pushed down it bounces back about an inch. I have a 150mm model and on a normal seat drop I can usually get about 120mm after it bounces back. If I sit on it for a few seconds with the remote engaged it's better than that. The cable is pretty stiff and the loop around the handlebar tends to be a bit long. The attachment of the cable to the seatpost is a bit fragile. The plastic barb that keeps everything in place is a joke and I recommend always having a spare one handy. Even with the flaws, this one is probably my favorite.
    I am running a Lev 150 on my Chilcotin and have not experienced the bounciness you describe. It just goes up and down, but I only have about 10 rides on it so far. I can definitely hear it top out when raising it, and it goes all the way down when I lower it. Both actions are very smooth.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,315
    Quote Originally Posted by BryanS. View Post
    I am running a Lev 150 on my Chilcotin and have not experienced the bounciness you describe. It just goes up and down, but I only have about 10 rides on it so far. I can definitely hear it top out when raising it, and it goes all the way down when I lower it. Both actions are very smooth.
    X2
    No problem with creep on my lev 150 either. Once slammed it goes all the way down and stays there. I've had mine s out 6-7 weeks (~30 rides).

    And yes brandon, you'll need two. Once I got a dropper on my main bike it wasn't long before I "needed" one on my backup XC bike..... They're that addictive (and useful).
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

    www.stuckinthespokes.com

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rscecil007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,460
    I've not experienced that bounciness on my two Lev's either, FWIW. Maybe there's an issue?
    If jackasses could fly this place would be an airport.

  46. #46
    TSC
    TSC is offline
    Buehliever
    Reputation: TSC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    873
    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    Maybe there's an issue?
    I agree; that's not working like mine. Do you have the same problem when you try to set it at an intermediate height (i.e. will it stay at the height you release the cable)? If it exhibits the same problem at an intermediate height then it could be a cable drag problem (taking to long to engage the locking mechanism).
    "sounds like you need to find a better mechanic..." -- Calhoun

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rscecil007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,460
    Yeah, the cable drag theory seems plausible. Maybe the cable has stretched or isn't tight enough?
    If jackasses could fly this place would be an airport.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: F.N.G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,447
    Dropper seat posts are just like Chilcotins. You are on the fence of getting one, and once you do, you're like "I cannot believe I waited this long on getting one"!!!!!

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    194
    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    Yeah, the cable drag theory seems plausible. Maybe the cable has stretched or isn't tight enough?
    If the cable had stretched, then it would not allow you to drop it at all. However a cable that is too short could cause it to creep down, but I wouldn't expect it to be bouncy. I expect that it may need to be bled. Do you lift up on the saddle at all? If so, it is possile that you have cause negative pressure on the seals and sucked in some air. That would make it behave that way.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,519
    Currently using a newer Reverb 125. It's great but the cable is getting some wear and tear from the rocker and seat stay yolk. No issues so far other than it goes up and down slower in cold temps. I like its lever best out of everything I've ridden - it's solid, compact and easy to access. I've been on this one since November or December and haven't had to bleed it or provide any service. I'll probably swap out the cable soon to avoid it tearing from the wear when on a ride. If it does fail it will likely be because I neglected it.

    I setup and used a KS Lev 150 for a few rides. I like that the cable is mechanical and can be completely pulled apart. The fixed mount is great and the up and down motion was smooth. The biggest issues were the big loop off the lever (you could probably use a curved piece of metal housing at the lever to fix it), and a little slack in the initial lever actuation. I didn't like the 150 drop as I was coming off of a 100mm Gravity Dropper and was used to just slamming it all the way down during rides. 150 is too low to pedal and it always felt like I was fiddling with the lever to get a good position instead of just riding. 125 seems perfect.

    I also rode a Gravity Dropper for years and the thing was bullet proof. As far as reliability, durability and serviceability goes it's the best. I've kept it as my back up to the Reverb.

    There's a little play in all of these at the saddle but I've never noticed it when out riding. I'd say the GD has the most.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Gravity Droppers
    By BoomingSooner in forum Arizona
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 05-16-2012, 11:51 AM
  2. How are Gravity Droppers holding up under Clydesdales?
    By Vermont29er in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 05-15-2012, 08:02 PM
  3. Who Stocks Gravity Droppers in South Bay or SC
    By half_man_half_scab in forum California - Norcal
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 02-27-2012, 09:53 AM
  4. Chain Droppers
    By pcire in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-21-2011, 06:16 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •