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  1. #1
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    Chili slippage - Front Ardent 2.4 washed out on loose stones

    Up until now ive been a great fan of the Maxxis Ardent. In the past its been great for roots, rocks, rough and fast terrain.

    But that was on a different bike (less slack geo) and different trails.

    The Chili has a slacker head angle than the last bike so it might be the case that some of the reason for the wheel slipping out is relative my positioning on the bike, i.e. not enough weight over the front wheel (im sure i was pretty central at the time).

    Yesterday the 2.4 Ardent washed out from under me on an s-bend which was hardpack with loose stones on top. I was rolling at medium speed as the corner wasnt that tight. It was one of those very unexpected slippages where you wonder 'how on earth did i crash on that bit of trail!'. It was a bit of a weird one.

    I used to run a 2.35 Panaracer Rampage front and it seemed to hold better in medium speed corners with loose stones etc.

    Any ideas on alternative tyres that hold better on marbles! over hardpack or even any Chili specific riding techniques that prevent front wheel wander?

  2. #2
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    When I switched from my XC bike to the Chili that was one of my biggest problems. With geo this slack, sometimes you really have to get aggressive with weighting the front wheel. Go to Seattle and follow Muttonchops around, you'll learn to corner.

    Regarding tires, I like Trail Kings for slower speed techy stuff and Butchers when the speeds pick up. Currently running a 2.5 Butcher SX front and 2.4 TK rear. Read the Trail King/Hans Dampf thread for more information.

  3. #3
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    yes, slacker front ends require more aggressive riding and positioning (forward plus bike body separation and angulation) and more aggressive tire designs to support it. Tires won't make as much difference in marbles but bike body separation will improve your control of the situation.

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    Maybe it's cause you're going faster now on the chilli?

    What I noticed is like everyone else said the knolly requires a much more aggressive riding position. Almost ridiculously so. At first I rode it like how I used to ride other bikes, that being more balanced but after awhile I found that the more weight I put on the front the better. This was especially difficult to get used to when going downhill because it can be initially scary. Bit hard to describe but it almost feels like you're just riding on the front wheel. Well that's my experience anyway.

    Oh yeah and I have 2.5 maxxis minion super tacky front and rear so I don't find front washing out an issue.

  5. #5
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    Turn quicker, lean less. Works with every brand of tire.
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  6. #6
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    Chili slippage - Front Ardent 2.4 washed out on loose stones

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    Turn quicker, lean less. Works with every brand of tire.
    This makes ZERO sense.
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  7. #7
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    Chili slippage - Front Ardent 2.4 washed out on loose stones

    Quote Originally Posted by frenchcr View Post
    Up until now ive been a great fan of the Maxxis Ardent. In the past its been great for roots, rocks, rough and fast terrain.

    But that was on a different bike (less slack geo) and different trails.

    The Chili has a slacker head angle than the last bike so it might be the case that some of the reason for the wheel slipping out is relative my positioning on the bike, i.e. not enough weight over the front wheel (im sure i was pretty central at the time).

    Yesterday the 2.4 Ardent washed out from under me on an s-bend which was hardpack with loose stones on top. I was rolling at medium speed as the corner wasnt that tight. It was one of those very unexpected slippages where you wonder 'how on earth did i crash on that bit of trail!'. It was a bit of a weird one.

    I used to run a 2.35 Panaracer Rampage front and it seemed to hold better in medium speed corners with loose stones etc.

    Any ideas on alternative tyres that hold better on marbles! over hardpack or even any Chili specific riding techniques that prevent front wheel wander?
    Why did you not mention the bike change in your other post about this?

    IME slacker HTAs, longer front centers and shorter stems = lack of front end grip in most conditions.
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  8. #8
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    While the Ardent are good all around tire,
    The Highrollers and Minions never fails me on turns,
    When trails gets tougher, Just stand up and deliver.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    This makes ZERO sense.
    That's because you don't understand.
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  10. #10
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    The Ardent's side (cornering) knobs are thin and terribly unsupported compared to the Minion and High Roller: it can not handle aggressive cornering like these other two tires can. It does roll faster though with the more continue centre tread patern...
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  11. #11
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    Make sure your chin is on the same imaginary line as the steering axis or in other words your chin should be above the stem

    I also run a few psi less in front tire regardless of setup

    Stay tuned as I am in the process of fixing this issue...

  12. #12
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    You just described where the Ardent fails, it's horrible at hardpack with loose over top, I've had m y 2 hardest falls on this exact terrain when running an Ardent up front. Best advice here so far is to run a different tyre if you ride this sort of trail composition regularly, your old Rampage is a good choice, as is the HR2. The slacker HTA will play a difference, but in my experience, this is where the Ardent fails badly.

    Quote Originally Posted by frenchcr View Post
    Up until now ive been a great fan of the Maxxis Ardent. In the past its been great for roots, rocks, rough and fast terrain.But that was on a different bike (less slack geo) and different trails.
    Yesterday the 2.4 Ardent washed out from under me on an s-bend which was hardpack with loose stones on top. I was rolling at medium speed as the corner wasnt that tight. It was one of those very unexpected slippages where you wonder 'how on earth did i crash on that bit of trail!'. It was a bit of a weird one.

    I used to run a 2.35 Panaracer Rampage front and it seemed to hold better in medium speed corners with loose stones etc.

    Any ideas on alternative tyres that hold better on marbles! over hardpack or even any Chili specific riding techniques that prevent front wheel wander?
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
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  13. #13
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    As everyone else has stated position over the bike plays a large part in how well your tires grip/hold a line.
    Lean the bike not your body and favour a forward position over the bars. How far forward depends on a lot of factors. Play with it and find what works.

    The other thing that has been stated is that the Ardents suck as a front tire.
    These tires really need you to commit to leaning the bike over hard to get any kind of grip while cornering.

  14. #14
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    Yes, my riding position needs to be slighty forward (chin over the stem), i recognised that at an early stage but may not have held it at the time in question (still getting used to the bike).

    My style of riding since ive started to feel at home on the Chili has been to deliberately pick the hardest lines (with rooty sections, and rock gardens) and then storm through it at speed, as im enjoying the novelty of the chili being able to soak it all up.

    The problem i might encounter with High Rollers and Minions is that the tread isnt so deep. On hardpack, if loose stones are larger than the depth of the knobs then the tyre will be lifted off the ground as it travels over them.

    It would be good to get a tyre with the volume of the ardent but with more centre to side support and deeper tread. This makes me wonder if a good candidate might be the 2.4 Schwalbe Big Betty (with Trailstar compound).
    Last edited by cfrench; 04-27-2013 at 01:30 PM.

  15. #15
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    Chili slippage - Front Ardent 2.4 washed out on loose stones

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    That's because you don't understand.
    Care to explain it then? IME cornering on a bike by turning the bars at any speed above a walk is c##p technique, slow and sketchy.
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  16. #16
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    Chili slippage - Front Ardent 2.4 washed out on loose stones

    Quote Originally Posted by frenchcr View Post
    Yes, my riding position needs to be slighty forward (chin over the stem), i recognised that at an early stage but may not have held it at the time in question (still getting used to the bike).

    My style of riding since ive started to feel at home on the Chili has been to deliberately pick the hardest lines (with rooty sections, and rock gardens) and then storm through it at speed, as im enjoying the novelty of the chili being able to soak it all up.

    The problem i might encounter with High Rollers and Minions is that the tread isnt so deep. On hardpack, if loose stones are larger than the depth of the knobs then the tyre will be lifted off the ground as it travels over them.

    It would be good to get a tyre with the volume of the ardent but with more centre to side support and deeper tread. This makes me wonder if a good candidate might be the 2.4 Schwalbe Big Betty (with Trailstar compound).
    You are never going to find a tire with tread deeper than the size of the rocks. At best, you use a tire with large enough gaps between the knobs to capture the gravel and reduce the skating. If the tread is too tight you might as well be running a slick. The rocks will just roll under the tire.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    You are never going to find a tire with tread deeper than the size of the rocks. At best, you use a tire with large enough gaps between the knobs to capture the gravel and reduce the skating. If the tread is too tight you might as well be running a slick. The rocks will just roll under the tire.
    Thanks shiggy. Ill try again, it would be good to get a tyre with the volume of the ardent but with more centre to side support. The Minions and High Rollers seem to have lower volume than the Ardent but i quite like 'fat tyres'.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Care to explain it then? IME cornering on a bike by turning the bars at any speed above a walk is c##p technique, slow and sketchy.
    ...."by turning the bars", now I know you don't understand. Go get Twist of the Wrist II and read it. Code is more verbose and caring than I am. Maybe try racing a 400# motorcycle a bit, too.
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  19. #19
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    Chili slippage - Front Ardent 2.4 washed out on loose stones

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    ...."by turning the bars", now I know you don't understand. Go get Twist of the Wrist II and read it. Code is more verbose and caring than I am. Maybe try racing a 400# motorcycle a bit, too.
    Sorry, no. No desire to ride any moto. Explain yourself here and in relation to bicycles. How do you turn a bicycle quicker while leaning less and without turning the bars?
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  20. #20
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    Chili slippage - Front Ardent 2.4 washed out on loose stones

    Quote Originally Posted by frenchcr View Post
    Thanks shiggy. Ill try again, it would be good to get a tyre with the volume of the ardent but with more centre to side support. The Minions and High Rollers seem to have lower volume than the Ardent but i quite like 'fat tyres'.
    The better question is why the Ardent worked for you before and does not now.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by B Gillespie View Post
    Currently running a 2.5 Butcher SX front and 2.4 TK rear. Read the Trail King/Hans Dampf thread for more information.
    Thanks for the link. The consensus in that thread for best front tyre seems to be:
    1) Schwalbe Big Betty Trailstar 2.4
    2) Schwalbe Hans Dampf Trailstar 2.35
    and maybe the Continental Baron Black Chili 2.35
    ...with the TK out back.

    I might try the 2.4 Big Betty out front and leave the 2.4 Ardent currently fitted out back (as the Ardent as a rear has been flawless).

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    The better question is why the Ardent worked for you before and does not now.
    The trails were more natural and the Ardent sheds mud well in loamy/muddy conditions.

    The trails i need the different front tyre for are hardpacked stoney ground with loose stones.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flucod View Post
    I used to have the Ardent in the front and hit a turn hard and it washed. I have been using the Hans Dampf and have had no issues cornering. Great tire.
    Cheers. Ive just ordered a Big Betty from bike-discount.de for a great price (half RRP).

    Im going to sell the front Ardent on ebay and order a back up front tyre. This will be the Schwalbe Hans Dampf Evo Super Gravity VertStar 2.35" TL-Ready. Between those two seems like i should be good to go.

    As i said before i really cant fault the 2.4 Ardent on the rear, it has been great for climbing traction.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    ...."by turning the bars", now I know you don't understand. Go get Twist of the Wrist II and read it. Code is more verbose and caring than I am. Maybe try racing a 400# motorcycle a bit, too.
    Let me get this straight..
    Your trying to say Counter-Steering works on this type of bicycle?

    I couldn't disagree more
    the mechanics of body steering are what are more applicable to bicycles. And, even that really isn't the same thing

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Sorry, no. No desire to ride any moto. Explain yourself here and in relation to bicycles. How do you turn a bicycle quicker while leaning less and without turning the bars?
    My simple instructions did not include an invitation to question them. Inept attempts to draw out some non-existent contradiction are a waste of your time and won't improve your riding. Reading that book might - also goes for the other guy.
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    My simple instructions did not include an invitation to question them. Inept attempts to draw out some non-existent contradiction are a waste of your time and won't improve your riding. Reading that book might - also goes for the other guy.
    And, have you actually been to the class?
    oh wait... "CLASS" thats the Pridmore body steering thing?
    I meant school..

    Maybe we should keep this thread on point
    Ardent washing out..
    some good info on moving weight more over the front wheel
    some hints at how bike geometry can affect body position
    the Ardent's positive and negative attributes and why
    some good tire choice alternatives for running an Ardent on a 160 AM bike like the Knolly

    Ohh yeah.....
    " Turn quicker, lean less. Works with every brand of tire "


    bringing up Keith Code in this kind of context just invites some pokin'

  27. #27
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    frenchr,,, hope ive got this right sorry if not. your up in scotland arent you, so i assume your ridng trailcentres, ( 7 staines) going off your coments about hardpack trails and loose gravel. i ride uk trail centres to, mainly lee quarry, occaisional gisburn forest and the odd lake district trip. on the dt i always used highrollers, never had a problem with grip. using both 60a and 42a supertacky, i find they roll well grip well and corner well. even at speed on the loose pea gravely trails. my only complaint about them is how quick they wear. i seem to wear out my rear tyre in 5 weeks of whistler riding.

    on my hardtail which i mainly ride at home in the uk i usually run maxxis swampthings. again these offer great grip specially in the crappy uk conditions, they also grip well on the hardpack trailcentre type trails. i had the swampthings on last march when we visited the staines for a week, they performed well. the only problem i had was i kind of destroyed the rear tyre, ripping off a few of the knobbs on the slab lol. to be fair though the tyres were almost 3 years old.

    i replaced them with hansdamph but i didnt like them, they were to soft on the side walls, and had no grip. on one ride i got 3 pinch flats, thats when i decided they were going in the bin. and replaced them with highrollers.
    now to be fair, i should also state at this point that i took the cheap option. (ian now hangs head in shame and faces the naughty boy corner) i got the cheapest ones the 23 quid ones. so thats probably why i found them so crap. im not sure what the expensive ones would be like, but looking at the reviews i assume they would be good.

  28. #28
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    Thanks delirian. I live in peebles. I wiped out on the 'magic mushroom' section of the red route at GT. Its a pretty mellow trail, but loose stones at the side of the trail had crept into it in numbers.

    The pic below shows what our terrain is like.
    Chili slippage - Front Ardent 2.4 washed out on loose stones-kirroughtree_mountain_biking_scotland_4.jpg

    I might go tubeless front and rear with Big Betty Freerides or High Rollers.
    Id go back to Panaracer Rampage but they aren't good on roots.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    My simple instructions did not include an invitation to question them.
    Classic Mrwhlr

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    What's your weight and tire pressures?

    I've noticed that when I run higher pressures I lose on grip.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom34 View Post
    What's your weight and tire pressures?

    I've noticed that when I run higher pressures I lose on grip.
    13 stone, 20 front 25 rear.

  32. #32
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    guess this moved from wheel forum

    No one mention higher spring rate on the fork? If hsr isn't fast enough you will lose on those high speed blown out turns, front will just push out on those steeps

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deerhill View Post
    No one mention higher spring rate on the fork? If hsr isn't fast enough you will lose on those high speed blown out turns, front will just push out on those steeps
    Nope it wasnt that either bud.

    Its the tyre. It sucks when your between the centre and edge, the gap is too wide.

  34. #34
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    muddy marry

    Quote Originally Posted by frenchcr View Post
    Nope it wasnt that either bud.Its the tyre. It sucks when your between the centre and edge, the gap is too wide.
    Sounds like the same reason I stopped using the dhf out front on tight rutted out off camber.. know it's gonna slip, but still has mind of it's own as it hooks

  35. #35
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    I tried the ardent and took it off after 3 rides. No good in Austin rocks/marbles.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by frenchcr View Post
    Nope it wasnt that either bud.

    Its the tyre. It sucks when your between the centre and edge, the gap is too wide.
    That "gap" on the Ardent is the exact reason I didn't get them. Minion DHF up front bite in exceptionally. I run mine at 20 psi up front.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by mayha View Post
    Minion DHF up front bite in exceptionally. I run mine at 20 psi up front.
    Ive got a 2.4 Big Betty Trailstar ordered, if i have the durability problem (some pictures in the TK/HD thread of rocks eating them) then i guess there is not much point in trying the other two Schwalbes with trailstar compound (Muddy Mary, Hans Dampf).

    If they prove too soft then i'll go back to Maxxis and get a Minion or High Roller..the reason i didnt go there initially is that they have a smaller volume than the Ardent and i like fatter tyres.

  38. #38
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    I'll throw another tire into the mix, the on-one Chunky Monkey. This is a Maxxis built tire. It is build on the Ardent 2.4 EXO casing, with 2 compound options. The Trail Extreme is 50/42, and the Enduro is 50a (not 60a). I can't provide too much of a review yet as I only have 3 rides on them, but my initial impressions are that these are keepers. The tires are massive, have a bit more of a square profile, and have what I would call a transition knob about every 3 knobs. I prefer tires without transition knobs, I couldn't get with the Hans Dampf, and think it is terribly overrated, at least here in the desert. Anyway, my tires weighted in at 802/816g, have a nice stout sidewall, setup tubeless well, and the compounds are spot on. When looking at the CM, I thought the side knobs should have been taller, but I am rethinking this. The side knobs are very well supported and do not flex. Even with the 42a compound.

    On the trail, these are not the best rollers, but who cares? These are about traction. I find the braking to performance to be excellent, front and rear. When leaning the bike over, I find they get to the side knobs easily, making it very easy to set the edge, unlike the HD which feels like the tire is fighting me. Once on the edge they feel as good or better than my favorite Specy Butcher tire. The Butcher SX side knobs are tall, but do fold over easily, the CM does not. I find the CM is excellent when things get loose. It holds a line very well which requires very little correction in a straight line.

    On the rear, it works very well. The climbing traction is good, maybe not as good as the Trail King, but cornering and braking traction are better. I am running the Enduro compound on the rear, and after 3 rides it shows no signs of wear. After a 9 mile ride on the HD Pacestar, it looked like I had a month of riding on it.

    I will update my review soon, but this is an exciting tire. $30 and free shipping for a well designed Maxxis tire, count me in. On-One Chunky Monkey 26"x2.4"
    Employed by Pivot Cycles - www.pivotcycles.com

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er View Post
    I'll throw another tire into the mix, the on-one Chunky Monkey. This is a Maxxis built tire. It is build on the Ardent 2.4 EXO casing, with 2 compound options. The Trail Extreme is 50/42, and the Enduro is 50a (not 60a). I can't provide too much of a review yet as I only have 3 rides on them, but my initial impressions are that these are keepers. The tires are massive, have a bit more of a square profile, and have what I would call a transition knob about every 3 knobs. I prefer tires without transition knobs, I couldn't get with the Hans Dampf, and think it is terribly overrated, at least here in the desert. Anyway, my tires weighted in at 802/816g, have a nice stout sidewall, setup tubeless well, and the compounds are spot on. When looking at the CM, I thought the side knobs should have been taller, but I am rethinking this. The side knobs are very well supported and do not flex. Even with the 42a compound.

    On the trail, these are not the best rollers, but who cares? These are about traction. I find the braking to performance to be excellent, front and rear. When leaning the bike over, I find they get to the side knobs easily, making it very easy to set the edge, unlike the HD which feels like the tire is fighting me. Once on the edge they feel as good or better than my favorite Specy Butcher tire. The Butcher SX side knobs are tall, but do fold over easily, the CM does not. I find the CM is excellent when things get loose. It holds a line very well which requires very little correction in a straight line.

    On the rear, it works very well. The climbing traction is good, maybe not as good as the Trail King, but cornering and braking traction are better. I am running the Enduro compound on the rear, and after 3 rides it shows no signs of wear. After a 9 mile ride on the HD Pacestar, it looked like I had a month of riding on it.

    I will update my review soon, but this is an exciting tire. $30 and free shipping for a well designed Maxxis tire, count me in. On-One Chunky Monkey 26"x2.4"
    I hadn't seen them before now, good shout and good review, they seem top banana

    For anyone who is unfamiliar with the brand, these tyres are one of Brant Richards designs, he is the chief designer for Nukeproof, Ragley, On-One and Titus. As he lives less than 2 hours drive from here the chances are that it will do the trick nicely.

    The tread is unusual but its intentions seem clear, the centre to edge transition knobs (see below), are placed in a line to provide 'supported' turning unlike the 2.4 Ardent...good to hear the edge knobs are solid too.

    Name:  CM.jpg
Views: 534
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    Over here its on sale for £15 which is uber-cheap, so id be aswell ordering one and giving it a go.

    As i said, ive got a 2.4 Big Betty TSC in the post too, so if i get time ill post a comparison between the Ardent, Big Betty and Chunkey Monkey.
    Last edited by cfrench; 04-29-2013 at 10:56 AM.

  40. #40
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    Anyone tried the Bontrager XR4 Team Issue?

    My local bike store told me today that if you buy one and try it out and dont like it, you can take it back to the store and get a refund. Its quite good of Bontrager to offer this. Im tempted to give it a go.
    Last edited by cfrench; 04-29-2013 at 11:01 AM.

  41. #41
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    Regarding the Hans Dampf

    Not in the same league as a BigBetty for cornering grip on mixed condition terrain.

    There is not enough open area between the shoulder and centre tread without cutting it.
    Works great as a slow crawler type tire, but when the speeds pick up, they tend to wash, especially with anything loose over. On baked hard-pack they are money, but throw in any loose and some speed and you will either want to cut them, or goto something different.

    I just cut my HDs but have not yet had a chance to really push them as conditions are a bit sloppy at the moment.

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  42. #42
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    Not used them personally, but a few guys have them in both 26" and 29" and they work quite well for our trails (rocky, rooty, high clay base), give good grip, seem very good in the wet/slippery, avg on shedding mud though. I expect though that being that the CM is designed for UK/Oregon slippery weather
    Quote Originally Posted by frenchcr View Post
    Anyone tried the Bontrager XR4 Team Issue?

    My local bike store told me today that if you buy one and try it out and dont like it, you can take it back to the store and get a refund. Its quite good of Bontrager to offer this. Im tempted to give it a go.
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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by frenchcr View Post
    I hadn't seen them before now, good shout and good review, they seem top banana

    For anyone who is unfamiliar with the brand, these tyres are one of Brant Richards designs, he is the chief designer for Nukeproof, Ragley, On-One and Titus. As he lives less than 2 hours drive from here the chances are that it will do the trick nicely.

    The tread is unusual but its intentions seem clear, the centre to edge transition knobs (see below), are placed in a line to provide 'supported' turning unlike the 2.4 Ardent...good to hear the edge knobs are solid too.


    Over here its on sale for £15 which is uber-cheap, so id be aswell ordering one and giving it a go.

    As i said, ive got a 2.4 Big Betty TSC in the post too, so if i get time ill post a comparison between the Ardent, Big Betty and Chunkey Monkey.
    not that it matters, but i thought i should mention that these tires were actually designed by mtbr's own Shiggy, not Brant

    i'm glad to see a positive review as mine are on the way, as soon as i heard these were on the ardent casing i was quite excited, as the ardent has a very nice fat casing

    as to the ardent washing out....the tire responds extremely well to heavy lean/aggressive cornering, which on loose marbles is not always the best approach, hence the ardent not being the best in the loose. i really love the ardent for most conditions and they are surprising on wet roots/rocks, but in the loose they are nearly useless
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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferday View Post
    not that it matters, but i thought i should mention that these tires were actually designed by mtbr's own Shiggy, not Branti'm glad to see a positive review as mine are on the way, as soon as i heard these were on the ardent casing i was quite excited, as the ardent has a very nice fat casingas to the ardent washing out....the tire responds extremely well to heavy lean/aggressive cornering, which on loose marbles is not always the best approach, hence the ardent not being the best in the loose. i really love the ardent for most conditions and they are surprising on wet roots/rocks, but in the loose they are nearly useless
    Was about to say the same but weren't those 2.2 size?.. the side lugs look like it but these're reversed every other

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    My simple instructions did not include an invitation to question them. Inept attempts to draw out some non-existent contradiction are a waste of your time and won't improve your riding. Reading that book might - also goes for the other guy.
    "Simple" to the point of being cryptic helps no one.

    If somebody can not or will not explain their advice, it is best to ignore them.

    Edit: Searched for "Keith Code." First hit was a review of his courses, dissing the instructors for not being able or willing to explain why they do things or how to accomplish them, and giving contradictory advise.
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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferday View Post
    not that it matters, but i thought i should mention that these tires were actually designed by mtbr's own Shiggy, not Brant

    i'm glad to see a positive review as mine are on the way, as soon as i heard these were on the ardent casing i was quite excited, as the ardent has a very nice fat casing..
    Quote Originally Posted by Deerhill View Post
    Was about to say the same but weren't those 2.2 size?.. the side lugs look like it but these're reversed every other
    Correct. I designed all of the On-One mtb tires. The CM 2.40 is the more aggressive model. The Smorgasbord 2.25 a bit less so. The CM and SGB are manufactured by Maxxis using their casings and rubber compounds, but the tread designs are 100% by me. Brant finalized the compound choices.

    The CM and SGB treads are related but not the same. Both are about traction and control.

    I pay attention to the space between the knobs as much as the knobs themselves. This goes back to my previous mention of finding a tire that "captures" the ground rather than floating over the top. The difference in edge block placements is to work with the rest of the tread.

    My personal riding style better suits a tread with good transition blocks, but with these I also maintained good negative space in that mid zone--transition with bite. With the SGB you can also cut down (which I prefer to do) or completely remove the intermediate knobs.
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  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Correct. I designed all of the On-One mtb tires. The CM 2.40 is the more aggressive model. The Smorgasbord 2.25 a bit less so. The CM and SGB are manufactured by Maxxis using their casings and rubber compounds, but the tread designs are 100% by me. Brant finalized the compound choices.

    The CM and SGB treads are related but not the same. Both are about traction and control.

    I pay attention to the space between the knobs as much as the knobs themselves. This goes back to my previous mention of finding a tire that "captures" the ground rather than floating over the top. The difference in edge block placements is to work with the rest of the tread.

    My personal riding style better suits a tread with good transition blocks, but with these I also maintained good negative space in that mid zone--transition with bite. With the SGB you can also cut down (which I prefer to do) or completely remove the intermediate knobs.
    Shiggy sorry about that. So my diagram is 'conceptually' right then? Why didnt you recommend the CM to me earlier? You even said why not go back to the Panaracer Rampage. Dont you think your double compound tyre is a good tyre for Glentress / Innerleithen / Kiroughtree / Fort William / Glencoe ?

  48. #48
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    CM looks an interesting tyre, thanks tisser for posting it up. I would need a 650b for the front, not sure if they are available yet in that size? Probably will try it on the back in 26 inch in place of the TK's.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by mykel View Post

    There is not enough open area between the shoulder and centre tread without cutting it.
    Works great as a slow crawler type tire, but when the speeds pick up, they tend to wash, especially with anything loose over. On baked hard-pack they are money, but throw in any loose and some speed and you will either want to cut them, or goto something different.

    michael
    does this part refer specifically to the HD? wasnt sure if you had switched to talking about the betty

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by loamranger View Post
    CM looks an interesting tyre, thanks tisser for posting it up. I would need a 650b for the front, not sure if they are available yet in that size? Probably will try it on the back in 26 inch in place of the TK's.
    Just to keep things clear here, the 2.4 Ardent still works very well as rear tyre. The CM was specifically designed as a front tyre, Im guessing it will be fine as a rear aswell.

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