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  1. #1
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    New question here. best bike stand for these frames?

    i'm on a small chilcotin. square tubes, drop post, external cable routing on the underside of the down tube and in the gap between the rear wheel and the seat tube. what work stand is working well for you and where are you clamping? i've got a performance stand and hate it.

    thanks!
    ride fast...take chances...

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by iridetitus View Post
    i'm on a small chilcotin. square tubes, drop post, external cable routing on the underside of the down tube and in the gap between the rear wheel and the seat tube. what work stand is working well for you and where are you clamping? i've got a performance stand and hate it.

    thanks!
    I have a L and use an old Park stand with a detachable cross bar (in the clamp horizontally) used for external racks. This way you can run it from stem to seatpost collar and avoid the post.

    Measure first of course to make sure the length works for your frame size.

    I use one of these: Yakima Tubetop - Yakima Rack Accessories

  3. #3
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    I have a Feedback Sport stand. I clamp it on the bottom of the top tube (open part of the clamp facing up), back toward the seat tube where it's most horizontal. This works well with my M Warden.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by matsf View Post
    I have a Feedback Sport stand. I clamp it on the bottom of the top tube (open part of the clamp facing up), back toward the seat tube where it's most horizontal. This works well with my M Warden.
    I do this and insert a shop rag in the clamp to protect the finish. Tried clamping to the upper dropper but the bike rotates in the clamp too easily.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  5. #5
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    does the clamp go all the way around the tube or is it clamping in the middle of the square side of the tube? i'm always worried i'm going to crimp the square side of the tube.
    ride fast...take chances...

  6. #6
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    May I make a recommendation?

    Get in the habit of ONLY clamping to the seatpost. Sooner or later, you will have a carbon frame, or mount up a buddies. If you clamp onto an irregularly shaped tube, you may hear sickening carbon fiber snapping sounds. Although, I have never heard of a frame breaking this way, it makes no sense to continue a habit that is risky, when an alternative is so easy.

    I only clamp my warden, and all other bikes onto the seat post. All droppers have plenty of room to go up the 4 inches or so needed to clamp to my Park stand.

    cheers
    Regional Race Manager, Knolly Bikes
    Washington, Oregon, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming

  7. #7
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    so you're clamping the stanchion on the drop post?
    ride fast...take chances...

  8. #8
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    I clamp right on the thick part of the dropper, where the seals and stuff are since enough of it sticks out to clamp there. I'd rather buy a new dropper than frame. Lots of people clamp on stanchion with a shop rag

  9. #9
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    guess that's the plan then, thanks! not enough exposed post under the stanchion to clamp there.
    ride fast...take chances...

  10. #10
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    Yea same dilemma with my Endo. I pull my dropper and insert an old seat post and clamp on that. Yea its a PITA, but not sure if its a good idea to put that kind of stress on the dropper
    kompressor

  11. #11
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    Its a pain with the internal droppers (I actually dislike them personally). But, yeah its the price you pay for progress. I guess there is a decision to be made about whether to clamp the stanchion or not. I usually clamp the seat post clamp and the head of the post where it abuts the rails. I leave the dropper down for this. When building the bike, I use a spare post. Anything is better than the top tube of a carbon frame.
    Regional Race Manager, Knolly Bikes
    Washington, Oregon, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming

  12. #12
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    i agree about the pressure on the dropper...
    ride fast...take chances...

  13. #13
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    I have 5 alloy Knollys, size small to large.
    Feedback Sports stand. I always clamp the top tube, clamp facing down, snug but not silly.
    The whole point for me is to make it convenient to work on my own bike. When it becomes a hassle just to put the bike in the stand, I stop fixing stuff. Then I'm riding a shitty bike, regardless of brand.

    For me to clamp the seatpost, I feel like the following steps would be necessary:
    1. Finally decide on the perfect height for each seatpost on each bike.
    2. Get a dremel or ice pick and score a line on the post so that moving it wouldn't result in the irritation of fiddling with my post height next ride. (see line 1)
    3. Switch to a QR seatpost clamp so that I can "Quickly Release" and slide my seat post up to make it clampable on the fat part that is safe to scratch.

    Dropper posts are the most finicky items on our bikes now. So to clamp down on the dropper post upper, thus creating a bunch of lateral loading and eventual scratching, seems like a guaranteed set up for more ride ending mechanicals. It also moves the clamping point further away from the bikes balance point, thus lengthening the lever arm and causing more issues with stand sagging and stand stability.

    I agree that internally routed droppers are not worth the hassle.
    Knolly Chilcotin
    Knolly Warden
    Knolly Podium
    Knolly Delirium

  14. #14
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    I've been clamping the dropper stanchion on all my bikes for years, never had a problem. Its not like the bike moves around a lot on the stand. When I'm done working I take it out. I have a scorpion stand and hangers for bike storage.

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