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  1. #1
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    Any tricks to getting out the bushings in the CCDB shock?

    My CCDBA came with too much play between the shock bushings and reducer/axles so Cane Creek sent me two replacement bushings and the tool to replace them.
    However, even after studying the directions 10 times and attempting to remove the top bushing (cannister side) I can only get it to budge a half millimeter or so.

    Any tricks I should know? Do I need to heat the area? Use WD40 ?
    Last edited by KRob; 04-28-2013 at 05:03 PM.

  2. #2
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    Any tricks to getting out the bushings in the CCDB shock?

    not sure if you got a similar tool from CC ... but maybe this helps:

    http://www.mountainbikecomponents.co...ame=Shock+Tool

    just download the "information sheet" ... simple to follow, pictured instructions.

    good luck!

  3. #3
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    Any tricks to getting out the bushings in the CCDB shock?

    The CC tool should do it without lubes etc. I have the same tool and it works well. You can use a large C-clamp or vice for more leverage with the tool. I use the C-clamp for the hardware because the Knolly hardware on the Delirium is longer than the tool.
    Last edited by Dude!; 04-28-2013 at 07:42 AM.

  4. #4
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    Does it take a lot of leverage/force? I guess that's what I"m wondering. I'm 95% certain I'm using the Cane Creek supplied tool correctly as per the instructions but with a allen key socket and a socket driver on one side and a decent sized 13mm end wrench on the other I got to a point after it moved ever so slightly where it won't seem to budge and I'm afraid of damaging something. In fact the receiving side of the tool is startting to mar the surface of the shock eyelet.

    I'm unable to visualize how I'd use a C-clamp or a vise to increase leverage. If I had a soft jawed vice it might help to hold the shock steady while I'm twisting the tools but that doesn't seem to be the main issue.

    I'll try and get some pictures up later of my set-up to make sure I"m doing it correctly.

  5. #5
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    Slightly off topic but... What did cane creek tell you about the loose bushing and hardware. I found my chilcotin to have a worn out upper bush after 4 rides and I made sure everything was torqued after the first few rides. It seems to me that the design of the mounting hardware doesn't allow the shock to be very secure. If I unbolt the top I can rock the bottom mount side to side. Same goes for the top mount. I've got an email in to CC so we'll see what molcolm has to say.

  6. #6
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    KRob, they may of sent you the wrong size tool? I read some where they did change the bush size a few years back. Get the calipers out & measure to be sure.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by finch6013 View Post
    Slightly off topic but... What did cane creek tell you about the loose bushing and hardware. I found my chilcotin to have a worn out upper bush after 4 rides and I made sure everything was torqued after the first few rides. It seems to me that the design of the mounting hardware doesn't allow the shock to be very secure. If I unbolt the top I can rock the bottom mount side to side. Same goes for the top mount. I've got an email in to CC so we'll see what molcolm has to say.
    I noticed a little vertical play in the rear end when I first got it built up. Just a slight amount but I couldn't track it down. When I emailed Noel he said it was probably the bushing on the shock and told me to pull the shock and if the reducer axles slid easily in the bushings it was too loose. Apparently they'd had some tolerance issues with the bushings and it was a known problem.

    When I called Malcolm at CC they sent out the new bushings and the tool without question.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by geo025 View Post
    KRob, they may of sent you the wrong size tool? I read some where they did change the bush size a few years back. Get the calipers out & measure to be sure.
    That thought crossed my mind but I figured their shocks all had the same size bushings so why would they have different sized tools.

    I don't have any calipers but the bushing tool matches the template in the instructions and holding the shock eyelet up to the template it looks about right. If it's off it's only by .1mm or less but that's kinda how it acts.

    I'll call them and double check tomorrow. I was hoping to solve the problem this weekend so I could be riding tomorrow moring. Grrr.

  9. #9
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    Nevermind. I'm a retard. Apparently reading the instructions 11 times (and with a new morning and clear brain) is required for uber-dork mechanics like me.

    The old bushings spun right out, the new bushing spun right in, and the reducing hardware had to be pressed in with a vice (like it should). All reassembled now and no play in the rear end.

  10. #10
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    Good to hear KRob. Malcom is sending me new bushings and installation tool as well. Sounds like I have the same problem.

  11. #11
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    Cool. Just be sure to use the right sized adaptor/seal driver. The instructions confused my sleep deprived mind and I was "sure" the bigger one was the one I needed (outside diameter appeared to match the bushings) but the smaller one was the one that worked..... very easily. D'Oh!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Cool. Just be sure to use the right sized adaptor/seal driver. The instructions confused my sleep deprived mind and I was "sure" the bigger one was the one I needed (outside diameter appeared to match the bushings) but the smaller one was the one that worked..... very easily. D'Oh!
    I made the same mistake about a year ago! Problem is, I destroyed the upper eyelet of the shock in the process. I thought, this bushing is freaking tight, but kept on turning the wrench until I realized what was happening. Luckily, Cane Creek and Knolly were very understanding and got everything sorted out.

    Are the tool instructions still a grainy print out with no information about different size adapters? I saw the instructions with black adapters and just figured those were the ones I was supposed to use.

    On a side note: Has Cane Creek figured out a long lasting axle/bushing combination for the DBair on Knolly bikes yet?
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  13. #13
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    Apparently your experience (and perhaps other's) prompted them to re-write the instructions. They do refer to the different sized adaptors/drivers and even have a template with matching circles the same size as the adaptors and bushings.

    Two sentences in the instructions confused me, though. One said that the OD of the adaptor must match the OD of the bushing or you could damage the shock eyelet (like bubba13 ) and as I put the adaptor up against the shock eyelet the bigger one clearly looked like a better match. The smaller one didn't even quite cover the whole edge of the bushing.

    Then it said once you've determined the size of the adaptor to use you would use the other one for the bolt end. So I'm thinking the bushings are different sizes and the bigger one fits the top (cannister end) and the smaller one fits the resevoir/boost ("bolt") end.

    It finally dawned on me this moring that when they said bolt end they were referring to the tool..... not the shock. Yeah, I know, I'm a tool.

    What constituted "ruining" the eyelet for your's? The driven side on mine did have the camfer increased a bit by the too-large adaptor and the outer edges of the receiving side have some scratches/scoring where the tool turned slightly while trying to force the thing. These are beyond the outside diameter of the spacers and rubber O ring so I didn't think they'd hurt anything.

    Hope I didn't ruin mine. First ride tomorrow. The shock seems secure and the play is gone so I hope all is OK.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Apparently your experience (and perhaps other's) prompted them to re-write the instructions. They do refer to the different sized adaptors/drivers and even have a template with matching circles the same size as the adaptors and bushings.

    Two sentences in the instructions confused me, though. One said that the OD of the adaptor must match the OD of the bushing or you could damage the shock eyelet (like bubba13 ) and as I put the adaptor up against the shock eyelet the bigger one clearly looked like a better match. The smaller one didn't even quite cover the whole edge of the bushing.

    Then it said once you've determined the size of the adaptor to use you would use the other one for the bolt end. So I'm thinking the bushings are different sizes and the bigger one fits the top (cannister end) and the smaller one fits the resevoir/boost ("bolt") end.

    It finally dawned on me this moring that when they said bolt end they were referring to the tool..... not the shock. Yeah, I know, I'm a tool.

    What constituted "ruining" the eyelet for your's? The driven side on mine did have the camfer increased a bit by the too-large adaptor and the outer edges of the receiving side have some scratches/scoring where the tool turned slightly while trying to force the thing. These are beyond the outside diameter of the spacers and rubber O ring so I didn't think they'd hurt anything.

    Hope I didn't ruin mine. First ride tomorrow. The shock seems secure and the play is gone so I hope all is OK.
    I doubt a small gouge will hurt anything if the opening is round and the new bushing fits properly. I actually managed to take the eyelet out of round.
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