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  1. #1
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    2007 Jamis Cross Country 2.0 Upgrades

    I got a 2007 Jamis Cross Country last summer, to try biking out and see if I liked it and well I getting more into it now and want to do some upgrades. I was looking at upgrading atleast the fork and and front derailer since I have to keep adjusting it and getting clip less pedals and shoes. Keep in mind that this is only a $400 bike so I don't won't to go crazy with the prices but I do want to upgrade my current components.
    Any suggestions?
    I was looking at these does any one have an opinion or know if they will work with my bike?

    Rock Shox Dart 3 Fork '07
    Dart delivers performance that's quite a bit higher than it's entry-level price might imply. You get TurnKey oil damping with lockout,
    and a 6061-T6 aluminum crown.

    * 4130 chromoly stanchions + 1-piece magnesium lowers
    * Available with or without Poploc lockout
    * Features adjustable spring preload
    * Standard 1 1/8" threadless steerer
    * Accepts both linear pull (V-brakes) and 74mm post mount disc brake calipers with 160mm rotor
    * 4.83 lbs


    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...3+Fork+07.aspx

    Not sure if that shock will fit my current disc brakes?



    Shimano PD-M520 Pedal

    An incredible value in an offroad clipless pedal from Shimano. The M520 features adjustable release tension and includes a set of SH51 SPD cleats with 4 degrees of float. These pedals will serve you well and won't break the bank. Dual sided mechanism lets you easily click in without looking down at your shoes.

    Compatible with shoes drilled with SPD compatible drilling.
    Weight: 370 grams (weight does not include cleats)
    Float: 4 degrees
    Material: aluminum

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...520+Pedal.aspx

    with
    Shimano SH-MT31 MTB Shoe

    multi-purpose shoe from Shimano, this one is designed to work for commuting, road, or casual off-road cycling.

    * Traditional lace-up design with a lace keeper loop
    * EVA midsole and rubber sole for durability
    * Accepts Shimano SPD and compatible clipless cleats (Time ATAC, Eggbeater, etc)

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...+Mtb+Shoe.aspx
    or

    661 Expert Shoe/Eggbeater C Pedal Combo

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...dal+Combo.aspx


    I have no clue about derailers

    Thanks in advance for your help!

  2. #2
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    Hi Fasttrack2fredom,

    I am a newbie, and can only comment on the derailers. Shimano is a good brand, with affordable components. You can upgrade to the value for money Deore, Deore LX/XT or even the high-end XTR.

    Your local bike store can help you out; you can also check out the components and get an estimate for your needs/budget. HTH.



    Quote Originally Posted by Fasttrack2fredom
    I got a 2007 Jamis Cross Country last summer, to try biking out and see if I liked it and well I getting more into it now and want to do some upgrades.
    I have no clue about derailers

    Thanks in advance for your help!
    Cheers,

    XC hardtail RP
    2008 Jamis Trail X 3.0 24S disc

  3. #3
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    Ideally you should find a different fork. The Dart is not the greatest, but the main reason is that it has 100mm of travel as opposed to your stock 80mm. What this does first off is change the head tube angle. This will make your steering slower. Additionally it puts extra stress on the head tube that the bike was not designed to handle and may void your frame warranty. What is your budget for a fork? I relaize there are not many good forks out there for less than $200, especially if you need an 80mm fork.

    As far as the derailler, don't think that getting a new front derailler will solve your problems. There is very little difference in performance in front deraillers. I have used many from low level Alivios to top of the line XTRs, and there is very little difference (rear deraillers are another story). The problem is that deraillers are very sensitive to even the smallest adjustment. If you are having problems setting up the one you have now it is not going to magically get better with a new derailler. Really the only adjustment you should ever have to make is cable tension. Once you set the limit screws correctly they should never ever need tweaking unless you have smashed the derailler into a rock or tree or something.

    The shoes and pedals you have chosen look good. SPD or eggbeaters is just a matter of personal opinion. I use SPD.

    If I were you the first thing I would upgrade are the brakes. I think your bike has Tektro discs, which I know first hand suck. A nice set of Avid BB5 or BB7s would do wonders for your stopping power.
    2012 On One Whippet 650b
    2012 Santa Cruz TRc 650b
    2014 On One Dirty Disco
    2010 Soma Groove
    1987 Haro RS1

  4. #4
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    Hi ljsmith,

    Many thanks for the info on the deraillers, learning a lot here I agree with your comments on Tektro IOX disc brakes which came on my bike. The instructions (and photo) on removing the brake pads are very different from the brake pads I have Plus, there are no Tektro brake pads available at the good bike shops here.....

    Well, I will just keep on using my bike until the brake pads (and other components) wear out, then replace them with better-quality items. So far, the stock bike is suited for my needs, but as I gain more experience, will know the items I would require to enjoy my bike
    Quote Originally Posted by ljsmith
    As far as the derailler, don't think that getting a new front derailler will solve your problems. There is very little difference in performance in front deraillers. I have used many from low level Alivios to top of the line XTRs, and there is very little difference (rear deraillers are another story). The problem is that deraillers are very sensitive to even the smallest adjustment. If you are having problems setting up the one you have now it is not going to magically get better with a new derailler. Really the only adjustment you should ever have to make is cable tension. Once you set the limit screws correctly they should never ever need tweaking unless you have smashed the derailler into a rock or tree or something.

    If I were you the first thing I would upgrade are the brakes. I think your bike has Tektro discs, which I know first hand suck. A nice set of Avid BB5 or BB7s would do wonders for your stopping power.
    Cheers,

    XC hardtail RP
    2008 Jamis Trail X 3.0 24S disc

  5. #5
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    As far as the fork goes $300 is the max i would want to spend. Looking at Jenson's website i only found this in my price range at 80mm. Thanks for the info I wasnt even aware that I had to stay aat 80mm for the fork.

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...Pro+Lo+08.aspx

    The Marzocchi MX Pro Lo features the perfect combination of high-end performance and features at a great price, with your choice of 80mm or 100mm of travel, and advanced lockout to help you conquer any killer climb. The MX Pro Lo gives you the option of using V-brakes, or using post mount disc brakes with rotors up to 7" in size.

    Lock out
    RV
    One Side Coil
    Alloy XC Steer Tube
    30mm Aluminum Stanchions
    V-Brake Optional
    6 Post Mount (Max Disc 7)
    Weight(Claimed): 4.89 lbs.
    The RVs roots are from the super reliable SSVF. The new RV is an easy to use rebound adjustment that controls the speed of extension while keeping the wheel on the ground in all riding conditions.

    The Lock Out cartridge allows to keep the fork compressed while mantaining a small amount of active travel; this is useful while riding on steep climbs.

    As far as the front derailer i called Jamis and they referred me to a local dealer, hopefully they will replace it under warranty. I shouldnt have to keep adjusting it like i do!

    I ll go ahead an order the pedal and boot combo I picked out when I figure out what fork im gonna get so thanks for the advice on that.

    And those Tektro brakes do suck, its almost time for some BB7's

  6. #6
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    Hi all,

    Haven't had the chance to take the bike out on actual trails to test the stock Tektro brakes, mainly due to the consistently rainy weather the past 3 weekends All tracks are muddy with deep ruts, not ideal conditions

    So far, have only been able to bike around the village, so can't really see what the stock brakes can do in trails. If the brakes need to be upgraded, I am going for the Avid BB7
    Cheers,

    XC hardtail RP
    2008 Jamis Trail X 3.0 24S disc

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fasttrack2fredom
    As far as the fork goes $300 is the max i would want to spend. Looking at Jenson's website i only found this in my price range at 80mm. Thanks for the info I wasnt even aware that I had to stay aat 80mm for the fork.
    That fork looks pretty good. You don't really have to stay at 80mm, but that is the safest thing to do, and keeps your warranty valid. Plenty of people will upgrade to longer travel forks and a 20mm difference isn't that much. I personally would not go beyond what the frame is designed for just because its not worth the possibility of having frame failure just so I can have more travel.
    2012 On One Whippet 650b
    2012 Santa Cruz TRc 650b
    2014 On One Dirty Disco
    2010 Soma Groove
    1987 Haro RS1

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