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  1. #1
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    Truvativ Crank on HP

    Are there any finer points to removing the Truvativ crank on a '04 HP Expert in order to get at the bottom pivot bolts? I cannot get an allen wrench behind the chainrings in order to ensure the bolts are tight. Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Is there quite a bit of set-up on the HP Expert? I'm getting a new one in a box tomorrow and can't wait to get started on it. Thanks, T

  3. #3
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    Nothing different from any other

    Quote Originally Posted by COMMITTED
    Are there any finer points to removing the Truvativ crank on a '04 HP Expert in order to get at the bottom pivot bolts? I cannot get an allen wrench behind the chainrings in order to ensure the bolts are tight. Thanks!
    Just make sure with the splined bottom bracket that you have a crank puller made specifically for them. A tapered hole crank puller will jam in the crank when you apply pressure.
    I'm in a groove now, or is it a rut?

  4. #4
    I like Guiness
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    Idea! depends

    Quote Originally Posted by Torque
    Is there quite a bit of set-up on the HP Expert? I'm getting a new one in a box tomorrow and can't wait to get started on it. Thanks, T
    for the first ride it only took me about 45 minutes to get it going. Now after about 5 weeks I have personally messed with everything as I tend to and traded all kinds of parts from my old bike. This has increased the "set-up" time by quite a bit because I changed the fork, rear derrailleur and I set the link to long-travel. If you are good at setting up derrailleurs you should be fine because they come un-tuned and that is the longest time I spent before the first ride. Be sure to check if the front derrailleur is set in the correct spot vertically because mine was about 1.5 cm too high and would not tune up as you might imagine. I spent about 20 minutes finding this out. Other than that there are some other posts around here about how to set up the shock!! good luck.

    peace.

    Robin
    "Bad hair = good science" -me

    "Two paths diverge in a wood, and I took the one more technical" (not always true)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by COMMITTED
    Are there any finer points to removing the Truvativ crank on a '04 HP Expert in order to get at the bottom pivot bolts? I cannot get an allen wrench behind the chainrings in order to ensure the bolts are tight. Thanks!
    Besides what they said, here is one more reason to carry individual tools in a pouch, specific to the bikes you ride. One of the tools in my pouch is a cut-down allen wrench, with the business end cut short enough to engage the pivot bolts hidden behind the chainring.

    It's no substitued to pulling the crank, threadlocking and properly torquing the bolt, but is good insurance while on the trail.

  6. #6
    Loose Nut Behind d' Wheel
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speed?e
    Besides what they said, here is one more reason to carry individual tools in a pouch, specific to the bikes you ride. One of the tools in my pouch is a cut-down allen wrench, with the business end cut short enough to engage the pivot bolts hidden behind the chainring.
    Thanks for the idea - I need to do that. I'm taking my HP to Moab in a couple weeks, and I may have to remove the rear end to fit it in the compact bike case I have available to use. I don't really want to pull the newfangled XTR Crank/BB assembly, because I've never done it and don't want to be reassembling it for the first time on vacation. My alternative was to undo the rings and slide them out of the way to access the lower pivot bolt.
    Look where you want to go. This is as true in life as it is in mtbiking.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucky
    Thanks for the idea - I need to do that. I'm taking my HP to Moab in a couple weeks, and I may have to remove the rear end to fit it in the compact bike case I have available to use. I don't really want to pull the newfangled XTR Crank/BB assembly, because I've never done it and don't want to be reassembling it for the first time on vacation. My alternative was to undo the rings and slide them out of the way to access the lower pivot bolt.
    Thanks for the feedback on the crank. Sounds like this is a Saturday afternoon typr project.

  8. #8
    Crawlin' like a Crawfish!
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    Lucky I guess!

    Quote Originally Posted by Lucky
    Thanks for the idea - I need to do that. I'm taking my HP to Moab in a couple weeks, and I may have to remove the rear end to fit it in the compact bike case I have available to use. I don't really want to pull the newfangled XTR Crank/BB assembly, because I've never done it and don't want to be reassembling it for the first time on vacation. My alternative was to undo the rings and slide them out of the way to access the lower pivot bolt.
    XTR Cranks? Do you really? What are they like?
    I'm in a groove now, or is it a rut?

  9. #9
    Loose Nut Behind d' Wheel
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoo00oom
    XTR Cranks? Do you really? What are they like?
    They came with the bike, or I almost certainly wouldn't own them. Way too spendy for what you get for me to buy aftermarket. They're, well, cranks. I'm sure their light weight is helping keep the overall weight of my bike under 30 lbs, but other than that, I don't see a huge advantage. I'm not big or aggressive enough to flex even cheap cranks, so I have no idea if they stand out in that regard. I can hardly wait to pay through the nose for replacement chainrings in their odd sizes. The spider arms are longer than most, so putting a bash ring on in lieu of the big ring doesn't gain any ground/rock/log clearance. (Fortunately, the HP doesn't need this, but I have another bike that would) The bearings on the '03's are reported to have a very short life due to poor seals on the original design. I've got a spare set on the shelf, but mine are holding up okay so far. I don't tend to torture bearings in most things, and I still have an often-maligned ISIS BB on another bike that just keeps going and going. So, in short, if I had to replace them tomorrow, I'd be looking for a more economical replacement, even with a small weight penalty, like XT, or one of RaceFace's new cranks, most likely.

    Kathy :^)
    Last edited by Lucky; 10-13-2004 at 09:43 AM. Reason: spelling
    Look where you want to go. This is as true in life as it is in mtbiking.

  10. #10
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    ...when removing the cranks...

    Quote Originally Posted by Torque
    Is there quite a bit of set-up on the HP Expert? I'm getting a new one in a box tomorrow and can't wait to get started on it. Thanks, T

    About the cranks.. they came with the self extracting bolts (at least mine have them). You have to give a lot of turns until they pops-out but they work. Make sure everythind that has a tread is well lubricated before install it (i.e. pedals). Verify the tension on the pivots bolts. Follow the directions about the front derraileur. Lubricate the seat rails (they make a lot of noise).

    Probably you will need to bleed your rear disc brake. So... look at Hayes's site for the instructions and get the bleeding kit. What I do was to purchase a special kit that came with the Hayes brakes when you purchase them separately. I found one at a bike shop. At a Beauty supply, purchase a small bottle of hair shampoo (those that came with the long cap that you can cut depending on the aperture need). You will need this bottle as the receiving one for the bleeding process. The full instructions are at their site as a PDF file with photos. They use an empty bottle of soda (20oz) for the job but mine looks cleaner and like it was part of the kit.

    If you came from the hardtail XC world, you may want to cut the handlebar. I found it pretty wide. Go get a small pipe cutter at a Hardware store. They do a very clean cut better that a hand saw and you can store it as part of your bike tools.

    Well... hope this help.

    Good luck!

    Erwin

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by COMMITTED
    Are there any finer points to removing the Truvativ crank on a '04 HP Expert in order to get at the bottom pivot bolts? I cannot get an allen wrench behind the chainrings in order to ensure the bolts are tight. Thanks!
    I removed my Truvative cranks earlier today, though not to get at the pivot bolts: there was some noise - a sort of creak / click - in the bottom bracket area, and I wanted to regrease the BB threads and crank interface to try to eliminate the noise.

    Removing the Truvative cranks is easy. Just insert an 8mm hex wrench into the crank bolt and turn counterclockwise. On mine, I found that once I got it loose, it would sort of tighten up again as I turned it. This is okay; all that's happening is that the crankarm is being self-extracted from the bottom bracket spindle. Just keep turning until the crank comes off. The crank bolt does not come all the way out. (IMO, this is much nicer than having to use a separate crankarm extractor.)

    There is also a 10mm hex bolt kind of piggybacked over the 8mm crankarm bolt. This, I gather, is part of the self extracting mechanism. Leave it alone. (If you want to tighten it, the Truvative manual states that it should be torqued to between 8.9-10.3 ft-lbs.)

    When you put the cranks back on, make sure the splines and threads in the BB spindle are well greased and tighten to 32-35 ft-lbs; this torque value is from the Truvative crankset manual.

    As for the noise, I don't know yet whether I was successful at eliminating it; it sounded okay when pedaling around on the street in front of my house, but then it usually does. I usually notice the noise more when I'm out on the trail. While I had the cranks off, I did check the pivot bolts. They seemed sufficiently tight to me.

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