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  1. #1
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    New in the club...

    Hi guys,

    I've just ordered my first IH Hollowpoint Sport.
    Since I live in Stockholm, Sweden (where there is no IH agent) I have never ridden one, but I like it so much just from reading about it, so I ordered it from SuperGo. (still waiting...)

    Now to my questions:
    I'm 6'5" and weigh 215lb, I ordered the big 21". Are the components (read fork and rear)
    "hard enough" for me? Can I pump them up enough for my weight? The reason I ask is that a week ago I tried a TREK Fuel and it felt soggy and soft.

    I do not compete, I just ride for fun.. and some exercise, mostly xc and trail.

    Second question: Does anyone experience with SuperGo? Was it a good choice or should I be worried? I mean deliverytimes etc. I know the price felt right!

    TIA
    Jens

  2. #2
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    Hi Jens,

    congratulations on your new ride, you'll love it !

    Regarding the suspension components, I believe you'll be allright with what you have. Those are all-around all-purpose components. Those should be spring shocks, so you might need to swap the springs for higher rated ones if they sag too much. Dialing in the sag on this bike is sort of the trick...

    Regardless, the design of the frame is such that when you stand on the pedals, it really feels like a hardtail, yet soaks up the bumps on the trail. I can now climb up hills I regarded as impossible before, just because of the added control it provides.

    I bought mine from Supergo also, although at the time they had the nifty little "where's my order ?" button that allowed me to track it from assembly (read "put it in the box") to delivery. Once you've received the bike though, and I believe like any online shop, Supergo is out of the loop, completely... For anything else you deal directly with the manufacturer. In that respect you don't have to worry.

    Have fun !

    Maurice

  3. #3
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    I'm a member too!

    Just got my Ironhorse Hollowpoint Expert. Took me months of researching and reading lots of posts here, so I hope I have made the right choice. It is my first FS bike after having only a few bikes in my 20 years of MTB riding.

    The BS I got it from had a Sport on the floor, it felt great on a short test spin. The size said Medium, but the BS guy measured it up to have a 23" effective top tube so we thought that equated to the 17" in the catalogue. Now that I have my Expert Medium, I've measured it and it is the 23.8" ETT of the 19". It also had 19.5 on the box.

    It seems to fit OK. My current ride has a 23" ETT with a 150mm stem so the Medium with 100mm stem ends up having a slighty shorter cockpit. Could do with more standover, but I think it is OK. Would have been nice to try out a 17" small but I don't think there are any left here in Australia

    The bike does feel different to what I am used to anyway with the much higher BB and hugely wide bars which I'll cut down some and I might put bar ends on.

    I swapped out the tyres to Michelin UST, Comp S Light on the front and XLS on the rear. Not sure if that was a good choice, but the BS didn't have much of a range. Front is not holding air so I'll get the shop to look at that or try remounting it. Thought I should try the UST system given that the wheels came with the bike, but I'm a bit sceptical.

    Otherwise, I haven't given it a good test yet. Going away over Easter and the week after so should get in some decent rides to get the suspension dialled in, I hope.

    Steve

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by slaw
    The size said Medium, but the BS guy measured it up to have a 23" effective top tube so we thought that equated to the 17" in the catalogue.

    Front is not holding air so I'll get the shop to look at that or try remounting it. Thought I should try the UST system given that the wheels came with the bike, but I'm a bit sceptical.
    Yup Steve, 19" is medium, 17" is small. Having a shorter stem makes the steering more responsive, you could go shorter than the stock 100mm still...You may want to get a zero offset seatpost like a Thomson to keep your weight nice and centred (centered for you amoricans)

    Did you guys get 04 models? Do they still have Float AVA shocks?
    Setup your rear shock for 8-10mm of sag with all your gear on. It's the sweet spot they seem to need. AVA chamber should be closed or not more than open, depending on how progressive you like the shock. (the DW design benefits from the progressive nature of an air shock, so the AVA chamber is kind of redundant).

    Try and get the knack of changing tyres without levers. The beads seal better when they haven't been levered. All you need is a track pump and Windowlene or soapy water. If you ride in thorn country you may need latex or Stans, which makes your UST setup pretty much puncture proof. (I haven't had a puncture in a year of riding). You can run them nice and soft but take care not to dent the rims in rocky terrain .

  5. #5
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    Steve,

    if I were you I'd leave those huge bars alone. They come in handy on those gnarly climbs, trust me on this. Give it a try. I felt thrown off at first too, but then realized the benefits. And once they're cut...

    However, I'm talking East-Coast style riding here: rocks, more rocks, vein bulging climbs, roots, mud, leaves, and rocks. Did I mention rocks ? The HP does wonders in that kind of terrain though, where hardtails don't have their place (unless you're masochist).

    I second the "leave those levers away from the tires" thing. Once the tires are deflated, making sure they are in the center of the rim all the way around ensures a no-pain unmounting. Same goes for putting the tire back on: bead in the center of the rim all the way around leaves more room to slide it over. The rim has a groove in the center especially for that. I got that from mounting my motorcycle tires by hand: withouth this trick (and soapy water of course), it's impossible to flip a 175 meat over the rim.

    Currently, both my tires have a puncture from thorns (well, the tires aren't the only ones tasting those thorns... my clothes are all shredded), but the air loss is so tiny that I merely put them back at the desired pressure before each ride. I'll probably just wear them out like that, I tried some tubular tire glue in the hole, but it's invisible form the inside of the tire.

    Cheers !

    Maurice

  6. #6
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    The bike is the 2004 model with Swinger 3-way. I've yet to fiddle with the pressures, just tried the shock pump out and it had something like 50psi in the SPV and 175psi in the main chamber.

    I remounted the tyre last night. Didn't use levers but did use some soapy water as per the Mavic instructions. Still didn't hold air overnight. Swung by the BS this morning and they said a bit of leakage was normal but suggested some Michelin Stop & Go Sealant. Was considering Stan's Sealant anyway, so I'll give this Michelin stuff a try first. It's in a pressure can which just goes on the valve so it should be easy to apply.

    My new bars are about 680mm wide which is a big increase from the 540mm minus the bar ends of my hardtail. I measured the other bikes I ride, 2 tandems plus my wife's mtb, and the most is about 600mm. I will try them out as is for a little while but I might go down to 640 or 620 initially.

    Still dying to take this thing off-road.

    Steve

  7. #7
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    Slaw, where did you get it from?

    Also, how much does in cost (in Australia)?

    I can't find anywhere that stocks them (although I haven't looked for a while). Maybe I just need to look harder

  8. #8
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    Brunswick Street Cycles in Melbourne

    Cost of the Expert was AU$3800 and the Sport was $2600. You could contact the Oz Ironhorse dealer for a local supplier. Details from the Ironhorse website.

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