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  1. #1
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    MKIII guaranteed to break?

    From reading this forum it sounds like it's a matter of when, not if a MKIII rear triangle will crack. Is that accurate, or are there some that survive?

    I came across a decent deal on a used 2007 MKIII Comp in my size (XL). Everything about it seems good, except for the threat of the rear triangle. I have a pretty meager budget at the moment. My thoughts are that if it can last a year or two then maybe I can buy a new frame and switch over components.

    I'm a larger rider, is there any chance that thing would hold up for a while? If the rear triangle does go are there any replacements around? Or should I just keep looking for something else?

  2. #2
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    i too would be interested in any thoughts on this subject.

    i rolled the dice picked up a new '09 model (21") about 6 weeks ago & have enjoyed every ride since.
    i'm not a small bloke (190cm, 100kg) and have noticed some tyre rub on the non drive chain stay but i'm not certain if this is a result of traingle flex or wheel flex. When weighing up the pros & cons during the purchase I decided that for what I paid for the entire bike would not have covered the cost of build parts alone. so if the the triangle fails & a replacement is unavailable at the time then all the gear will go onto another frame... DW link of course.

  3. #3
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    Most certainly NOT guaranteed - my 05 model (the first year) XL frame is still going strong. It has significant non-drive-side tyre rub, and I have run a bolted hub for much of that time. I'm 200lbs kitted to ride, mostly on rocky & rooty trails. No promises, but for the price - gamble as it may be - they are a damn good bike

  4. #4
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    there are too many variables to make a generalization like that.

    it's a damn good bike, when they don't break..

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by redmr2_man
    there are too many variables to make a generalization like that.

    it's a damn good bike, when they don't break..
    Not being a new bike a subjective-effect of this maintainence tip is not as vivid, but it can work and does work: Tighten your axles, pinch-bolts if you have Cranks w/ such, re-seat your stem and bars... before every ride! Neglecting this basic routine most definitely leads to a more rapid-failure of part or parts, if not only providing a sound ride. Especially with lightweight bikes!

  6. #6
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    By that you mean you are large by who's standard? If you don't want to give your actual weight, I'd say you're probably too heavy for one and you should save your bucks and buy something else. Consider a HardTail 29er and then when you get money down the road go for an FS 29er, at your height a 29er just makes sense and there's loads of decent ones out there under $1k.

    Quote Originally Posted by bvibert
    From reading this forum it sounds like it's a matter of when, not if a MKIII rear triangle will crack. Is that accurate, or are there some that survive?

    I came across a decent deal on a used 2007 MKIII Comp in my size (XL). Everything about it seems good, except for the threat of the rear triangle. I have a pretty meager budget at the moment. My thoughts are that if it can last a year or two then maybe I can buy a new frame and switch over components.

    I'm a larger rider, is there any chance that thing would hold up for a while? If the rear triangle does go are there any replacements around? Or should I just keep looking for something else?
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
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  7. #7
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    Currently 270, but in the process of dropping (again). I already have a HT, not looking to buy another for a while. I also have no plans to pay the premium to get a 29er any time soon.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Jemima
    Not being a new bike a subjective-effect of this maintainence tip is not as vivid, but it can work and does work: Tighten your axles, pinch-bolts if you have Cranks w/ such, re-seat your stem and bars... before every ride! Neglecting this basic routine most definitely leads to a more rapid-failure of part or parts, if not only providing a sound ride. Especially with lightweight bikes!
    Are there issues with the headsets and cranks as well as the rear triangles on these bikes, or is that just something you advocate in general?

  9. #9
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    Hey Bvibert!

    Is the rear triangle carbon?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by powbmps
    Hey Bvibert!

    Is the rear triangle carbon?
    I didn't know you were over here too!

    No, AFAIK it's aluminum.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by redmr2_man
    it's a damn good bike, when they don't break..
    That's what I keep hearing. The gamble would be easier to take if I knew I could still find a new rear triangle.

    I don't like hearing about rear tire rubbing, what size tires are you guys running? Stock rims? The bike I'm looking at has Sun Single Track wheels on it, will a stiffer rim help with the rubbing?

    I see a lot of people are recommending bolt on axles, what are you using? Is there any way to fit a 12mm axle in the dropouts (I have a rear wheel that's convertible)?

  12. #12
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    [quote=bvibert]...the headsets and cranks...quote]

    I am not advocating anything; if you neglect pre-empt such as this on any bike you have been a Fool. C'mon this is ankle-biter basic.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Jemima
    Quote Originally Posted by bvibert
    ...the headsets and cranks...
    I am not advocating anything; if you neglect pre-empt such as this on any bike you have been a Fool. C'mon this is ankle-biter basic.
    I routinely check my headset for play, but I don't re-seat my stem and bars unless there's a problem and certainly not before every ride. I've never once heard of anyone doing that, or recommending it until you in this thread. That's why I asked if it was something you'd do because of problems with MKIII's in general, or if you do it on all bikes. I'm curious about problems specific to MKIII's, not used bikes in general. No reason to get snippy about it.

  14. #14
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    The MKIII is a great bike. I've beaten mine pretty good and not had a single problem with it. I'm a pretty big guy too. 6'4", about 210lb. I currently have a 2.2 Nevegal on the back, no rubbing, and I'm running Single Track wheels with a Hope steel skewer.

    Great bike, you'll love it! I've read all of these stories of people breaking them, I don't know what you guys are doing to break them, I ride mine pretty aggressively. It's most likely just a bad manufacturing run, so some of us get lucky, and some don't...

  15. #15
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    Thanks for the input!

    What year is your MKIII, 888-rydr?

  16. #16
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    It is a 2007. I just bought the frame and built her up from there... Been a great bike!

  17. #17
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    Oh, it is a Used-Bike you were looking to hop-up here; you get what you pay for then. Seeing you have no initiative to examine your ride before you get on it, consider this: it is your Life you are taking in your own hands. If you can't take 10mins. at least, to check bolt-tension & crush-zones, bring everything back up to spec, with every-other ride at the very-least, then you're very well going to be feeling others supplying free-advice being 'snippy' with you! You asked to get the most out of this bike you aquired on your meager-budget. There is the best way and what to look for in ways of neglect.
    Take it for what it is.
    Quote Originally Posted by bvibert
    I routinely check my headset for play, but I don't re-seat my stem and bars unless there's a problem and certainly not before every ride. I've never once heard of anyone doing that, or recommending it until you in this thread. That's why I asked if it was something you'd do because of problems with MKIII's in general, or if you do it on all bikes. I'm curious about problems specific to MKIII's, not used bikes in general. No reason to get snippy about it.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Jemima
    Oh, it is a Used-Bike you were looking to hop-up here; you get what you pay for then. Seeing you have no initiative to examine your ride before you get on it, consider this: it is your Life you are taking in your own hands. If you can't take 10mins. at least, to check bolt-tension & crush-zones, bring everything back up to spec, with every-other ride at the very-least, then you're very well going to be feeling others supplying free-advice being 'snippy' with you! You asked to get the most out of this bike you aquired on your meager-budget. There is the best way and what to look for in ways of neglect.
    Take it for what it is.
    You're a bizarre character who makes interesting assumptions..

    Did I say anywhere that I don't ever check my bike? I actually said that I check my headset routinely for play, which is your only indication of what I do for maintenance. To assume that I just go off willy nilly on whatever unmaintained piece of crap I can find is pretty comical. You suggest that one should "re-seat" their stem and bars before every ride. I'm not even sure exactly what you meant by that, but to me it sounds like loosening the stem and headset adjustment, then re-adjusting and torquing it. That's overkill IMHO, and I've never heard of anyone doing it. If you want to waste your time then be my guest, but to call people fools for not doing so is just stupid. I know my stuff is torqued correctly because I set it that way in the first place, if something is loosening so often that it needs to be checked every single ride then there's a bigger problem to be addressed IMHO.

    BTW - you may want to work on your reading comprehension skills; I asked for input about failures specific to a bike that I'm looking at buying. NOT "to get the most out of this bike I aquired on my meager-budget.".

    Now, if you have some input specific to problems found with MKIII's then take your meds and please lets hear it, otherwise I would appreciate it if you would stop clouding up my thread with your ramblings. Thanks.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Jemima
    Not being a new bike a subjective-effect of this maintainence tip is not as vivid, but it can work and does work: Tighten your axles, pinch-bolts if you have Cranks w/ such, re-seat your stem and bars... before every ride! Neglecting this basic routine most definitely leads to a more rapid-failure of part or parts, if not only providing a sound ride. Especially with lightweight bikes!
    I'm not running defense here, and any rider def. needs to check/be aware of nuts, bolts, and wheels every ride (even during the ride), but "re-seat your stem and bars" is a symptom of an unseated headset cup (or too much paint on the ends of the head tube) that settles in during the first few rides (after which it no longer loosens up). That sort of thing is above and beyond normal bolt-checking.

    To the OP, I think a solid bolt-on rear axle, or the hefty 10mm QR that came on the bike (which I feel requires special frequent attention and lubrication of the cam to maintain maximum clamping force) is the secret to longevity on this frame. If you allow the triangle to flex out of parallel (i.e. wimpy/loose rear skewer/axle) it will likely have a shorter if not altogether brief service life.

    At 270#, though, I wouldn't let you borrow my bike.

    -F

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas
    I'm not running defense here, and any rider def. needs to check/be aware of nuts, bolts, and wheels every ride (even during the ride), but "re-seat your stem and bars" is a symptom of an unseated headset cup (or too much paint on the ends of the head tube) that settles in during the first few rides (after which it no longer loosens up). That sort of thing is above and beyond normal bolt-checking.

    To the OP, I think a solid bolt-on rear axle, or the hefty 10mm QR that came on the bike (which I feel requires special frequent attention and lubrication of the cam to maintain maximum clamping force) is the secret to longevity on this frame. If you allow the triangle to flex out of parallel (i.e. wimpy/loose rear skewer/axle) it will likely have a shorter if not altogether brief service life.
    Thanks, that's what I'm gathering about the rear axle. I believe the bike has a standard QR on it now, but I don't think that wheel set has been on there for very long. I'm going to look at the bike tonight, I'll see how it looks.

    At 270#, though, I wouldn't let you borrow my bike.
    Not many people would.

    I probably should have mentioned that my wheels rarely leave the ground. I'm not looking to huck this thing...

  21. #21
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    I have the same bike you are looking at, 07 MKIII Comp. I bought it new. I'm 215 lbs and I do huck my bike. Because of these threads I check the rear triangle before and after every ride. No problems so far and I love this bike. I've changed wheels I have XT Rhyno lites on the rear and a Atomlab 20mm on front. I put a Marzocchi 55R 20mm up front. New brakes are next. My buddy I ride with busted the rear triangle on his Stumpjumper on a 1 foot drop last year so I guess it can happen to any bike.

  22. #22
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    Let me make a Wild-Guess here bud, you are an Industry-Type. I'll go further, you were afilliated w/ Iron Horse too. Maybe an independant retailer, maybe not. Not the matter. I'm going to say you were with Monster, who learned pretty damned fast long ago just who I was and could-be from Spike Jonze. If this is the case-to-be, let it be know I still do not care for your way, your form, nor your agenda. So be it with my people, also Bud...

    If not, have a fine Day!
    Quote Originally Posted by bvibert
    You're a bizarre character who makes interesting assumptions..

    Did I say anywhere that I don't ever check my bike? I actually said that I check my headset routinely for play, which is your only indication of what I do for maintenance. To assume that I just go off willy nilly on whatever unmaintained piece of crap I can find is pretty comical. You suggest that one should "re-seat" their stem and bars before every ride. I'm not even sure exactly what you meant by that, but to me it sounds like loosening the stem and headset adjustment, then re-adjusting and torquing it. That's overkill IMHO, and I've never heard of anyone doing it. If you want to waste your time then be my guest, but to call people fools for not doing so is just stupid. I know my stuff is torqued correctly because I set it that way in the first place, if something is loosening so often that it needs to be checked every single ride then there's a bigger problem to be addressed IMHO.

    BTW - you may want to work on your reading comprehension skills; I asked for input about failures specific to a bike that I'm looking at buying. NOT "to get the most out of this bike I aquired on my meager-budget.".

    Now, if you have some input specific to problems found with MKIII's then take your meds and please lets hear it, otherwise I would appreciate it if you would stop clouding up my thread with your ramblings. Thanks.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Jemima
    Let me make a Wild-Guess here bud, you are an Industry-Type. I'll go further, you were afilliated w/ Iron Horse too. Maybe an independant retailer, maybe not. Not the matter. I'm going to say you were with Monster, who learned pretty damned fast long ago just who I was and could-be from Spike Jonze. If this is the case-to-be, let it be know I still do not care for your way, your form, nor your agenda. So be it with my people, also Bud...

    If not, have a fine Day!
    I have no idea what you're talking about. If I was an 'Industry-Type', 'affiliated' with Iron Horse then don't you think I would already know the answers to the questions I asked?

    Don't you have some bolts to loosen and re-torque or something??

  24. #24
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    Good Luck with all your Future-Endeavors.

    Quote Originally Posted by bvibert
    I have no idea what you're talking about. If I was an 'Industry-Type', 'affiliated' with Iron Horse then don't you think I would already know the answers to the questions I asked?

    Don't you have some bolts to loosen and re-torque or something??

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Jemima
    Let me make a Wild-Guess here bud, you are an Industry-Type. I'll go further, you were afilliated w/ Iron Horse too. Maybe an independant retailer, maybe not. Not the matter. I'm going to say you were with Monster, who learned pretty damned fast long ago just who I was and could-be from Spike Jonze. If this is the case-to-be, let it be know I still do not care for your way, your form, nor your agenda. So be it with my people, also Bud...

    If not, have a fine Day!
    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Jemima
    Good Luck with all your Future-Endeavors.
    Wow. Just.. wow. The guy was asking a valid question, you start making assumptions and he responds, and you make more assumptions. Then when called out, you just slink away.

    Anyways, I have two '03 Hollowpoints, which you could say were the MKIs, and haven't had any issues with cracking, even after 5+ summers of taking it to lift-assisted parks. The MKIIIs were built better and with heavier duty gussets.

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