Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3

    Dear Ska Todd, Great Bike with Deadly Brakes

    Todd I just purchased a 2004 Hollowpoint Expert. But with great disappointment I am experiencing serious complications with the Hayes “Nine” hydraulic brakes that were standard equipment on my 2004 Hallowpont Expert. Unfortunately, today I lost complete control on a long down hill decent because of very low braking pressure. You see, about a week after my purchase of my Hallowpont Expert and 3 good rides later I might add, I was able to squeeze my rear brake handles into my handle bar and still the bike would not stop with my rear brakes, side note though my front brakes seems ok. NO LEAKS ANYWERE!!!!!!!!! Before you ask. My LBS were the purchase was transacted was : Performance Bicycle Shop
    428 S State Route 59
    Suite 106
    Naperville, IL, 60540

    Performance graciously apologized for the complications and bleed the system and we were good to go for only 1 ride to my dismay, because my 2nd ride which commenced today ended up with tragic results, Unfortunately due to the weak braking system I was forced to go way to fast downhill because my rear brakes once again lost pressure and I could not control my decent. I happened to walk away in one piece but I was banged up pretty bad. On a real serous note, I believe the next time an incident similar to this occurs, it may be fatal or even worse paralyzing. It makes we wonder if there was a recall on these brakes Performance may have unintentionally overlooked? Could it turn out to be Performance is incompetent of servicing Hayes braking system or is there truly an inferior product on your Iron Horse bike? Other than my brake dilemma, this is a great cross country machine, and I have upgraded my EXPERT with the following components: “XTR 960” rear derailleur, “XTR SL- 952” Shifter pods, “XT Hollowtech II FC-M760 “crankset, Michelin “Hot S Wild Grippers” tires, LP Composites “B5” flat bar, Performance “Fort’e “carbon climb bars. While all these upgrades serve me a great purpose that I need to obtain, such as faster/ smother shifting, better cornering tires, stiffer cranks for better power transfer and a flat bar with climb bars for better weight distribution on my ascends, I really did not plan on changing my brakes just to simply STOP my bike. Unfortunately I feel there has to be a manufacturing defect on my braking system. Please help, was there any service advisories Performance may have overlooked or a possible recall by Hayes on the brakes. The Bike was purchase on July 8, 2004 in Naperville, IL. Bottom line, I purchased an Iron Horse product for two reasons, 1. The customer service is repeatedly praised on this web site. 2. Even though I am currently 33 and have resided in the Mid-West since 1992, I was raised in Deer Park and all my family still resides on Long Island. When time permits, I try to return to Long Island once or twice a year, and yes I have pounded my fare share of RP on my trips home. I must say, I am proud to brag the bike is designed by Long Islanders 20 minutes from my parent’s residence, so that sealed the deal. Also, do you gentlemen offer for purchase the shirts with the logo that is on the seat tube “engineered in New York, with the locomotive graphic” I would love to purchase one if you do, I also happen to be a freight train conductor out of Chicago. Thanks in advance
    Last edited by bjofnd; 07-28-2004 at 01:30 AM.

  2. #2
    On MTBR hiatus :(
    Reputation: Speedub.Nate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    9,145
    Nice, well thought-out first post for support on a public bulletin board! IH email broken?

    None of my business, I know, and far be it from me to critique someone's riding, but if you're counting on your rear brake to provide a whole bunch of control as you descend on the edge of sanity, you've got a long skid mark behind you and an accident in your near future.

    I'm not telling you you didn't have a problem with your Hayes brake (and I'm sure these guys from Lon Giland will sort it out -- they're great that way) but all your braking control -- the vast majority of it, anyway -- resides at your front wheel, and if that brake alone isn't enough to slow you & stop you, you're not using it to its potential.

    Hey, I'm just curious, with all those upgrades, wouldn't it have been cheaper to buy a Hollowpoint Team?

    Happy trails!

  3. #3
    Industry Loudmouth
    Reputation: ska todd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    965
    Quote Originally Posted by bjofnd
    Unfortunately, today I lost complete control on a long down hill decent because of very low braking pressure. You see, about a week after my purchase of my Hallowpont Expert and 3 good rides later I might add, I was able to squeeze my rear brake handles into my handle bar and still the bike would not stop with my rear brakes, side note though my front brakes seems ok. NO LEAKS ANYWERE!!!!!!!!!

    Performance graciously apologized for the complications and bleed the system and we were good to go for only 1 ride to my dismay, because my 2nd ride which commenced today ended up with tragic results, Unfortunately due to the weak braking system I was forced to go way to fast downhill because my rear brakes once again lost pressure and I could not control my decent.
    Based on your description of the problem, I think you brake problem lies not in the bleed of the brake but it the lever reach adjustment screw. On the inner part of the lever there is a 2mm allen screw. This screw has a loose fit in the bushing compared to previous generations of Hayes brakes. A similar experience happened to me at Whistler a couple weeks ago. I fixed it by backing out the screw and applying a dab of blue locktite (or thread tape).

    Have the Performance store call me directly at ext 206 or call Hayes if they have any questions!

    Quote Originally Posted by bjofnd
    2. Even though I am currently 33 and have resided in the Mid-West since 1992, I was raised in Deer Park and all my family still resides on Long Island. When time permits, I try to return to Long Island once or twice a year, and yes I have pounded my fare share of RP on my trips home. I must say, I am proud to brag the bike is designed by Long Islanders 20 minutes from my parent’s residence, so that sealed the deal. Also, do you gentlemen offer for purchase the shirts with the logo that is on the seat tube “engineered in New York, with the locomotive graphic” I would love to purchase one if you do, I also happen to be a freight train conductor out of Chicago. Thanks in advance
    Iron Horse was based over in Edgewood in the Heartland complex from 97 to 01. Now we are based in Islandia off exit 57. For clothing, we don't have anything w/ the train logo but have other Iron Horse tees, hats, & jerseys. Drop the Iron Horse sales dept a call at 800-645-5477 to order.

    -ska todd

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    573
    I had that issue with the lever reach screw backing in or out due to vibrations. As Todd pointed out I used a bit of loctite and some of it overflowed in the lever pivot making for strange results. Each time it was pretty easy to figure out what was wrong, those brakes are so simple.
    That said I've been using those brakes for over a year and in unimaginable conditions and they never failed me even when I messed them up. Haven't needed to bleed them yet, which is good because one of the plastic plates covering the bleed hole on the lever is broken and I'm dreading the moment I will have to remove the pin that's still in there...

    And as Nate said, you can pull the front binders way more than you think before you wash out, especially on a bicycle where hard braking is mostly done with the bike upright. On my 500lbs motorcycle I barely use the rear brake, even when the road is wet.

    Maurice

  5. #5
    Industry Loudmouth
    Reputation: ska todd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    965
    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice
    I had that issue with the lever reach screw backing in or out due to vibrations. As Todd pointed out I used a bit of loctite and some of it overflowed in the lever pivot making for strange results. Each time it was pretty easy to figure out what was wrong, those brakes are so simple.
    To avoid that funny feeling of the lever not returning correctly simply back the adjuster all of the way out of the bushing. Then, apply a little locktite and let it dry before screwing it back in. This will keep the locktite from dripping onto the bushing and gumming it up.

    -ska todd

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    573
    Quote Originally Posted by ska todd
    To avoid that funny feeling of the lever not returning correctly simply back the adjuster all of the way out of the bushing. Then, apply a little locktite and let it dry before screwing it back in. This will keep the locktite from dripping onto the bushing and gumming it up.

    -ska todd
    Thanks, I figured that out, although I spent a whole race backing out the lever. Didn't have the patience to wait for it to dry, riding time is so scarce

    Maurice

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,306
    Quote Originally Posted by bjofnd
    Unfortunately due to the weak braking system I was forced to go way to fast downhill because my rear brakes once again lost pressure and I could not control my decent. I happened to walk away in one piece but I was banged up pretty bad. On a real serous note, I believe the next time an incident similar to this occurs, it may be fatal or even worse paralyzing.
    Perhaps you should consider some bike riding lessons as it is obvious that you are riding well beyond your limits.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  8. #8
    New project, TBA shortly
    Reputation: dante's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,024
    Quote Originally Posted by CDMC
    Perhaps you should consider some bike riding lessons as it is obvious that you are riding well beyond your limits.

Similar Threads

  1. Mountain bike jargon/ lingo
    By bstguitarist in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 05-26-2005, 12:02 PM
  2. Good info on bike locks.
    By 2melow in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-06-2005, 12:02 AM
  3. If you need to know this.
    By KevinVokeyJ24 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 12-24-2004, 08:40 AM
  4. CCP Stories
    By General Coonskins in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-30-2004, 10:03 AM
  5. Ahoy! V-brake holdouts!
    By Padre in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 03-23-2004, 09:06 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •