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  1. #1
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    XC Racing with IGH?

    Ok, I'm being extremely lazy here, while I have done some surfing for technical specs and reviews on the Rohloff I'm not getting far and am going to get the low down straight from the horse's mouth (you).
    I'm looking at building up a Felt Race 29er Hard Tail for XC racing, I don't adhere to the whole weight = speed arguement as much as bike weight distribution = good handling = less energy expended = speed.

    So, please let me know, IYO:

    1). Does anyone XC race a Rohloff?

    2). I can live with 1x9 gearing, what is the Rohloff equivilant to in terms of conventional cluster gearing (11/32, 12/36 etc.)? - try and avoid ratios and chain length details for me at this stage

    3). Roughly how much heavier is a Rohloff than a conventional hub?

    4). Is there anything else on the market suitable for racing and if so what are the answers to the above?

    Thanks for your opinions, spirited brand discussion welcome.

  2. #2
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    There are folks that race Rohloffs XC. Especially during muddy conditions. Most appreciated is the very even spacing of gears in the larger gears, at about 13.5% for each gear shift, keeping you in your power zone of cadence.

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/r...pressions.html
    Last edited by Boyonadyke; 11-16-2009 at 09:35 AM.

  3. #3
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    Check through this forum; there's some good information about racing with IGHs and the differences between them. A Rohloff hub yields about the same gear range as a standard triple setup. A Shimano Alfine hub will give you the same gearing as a 12-38 cassette. The Alfine is lighter and many people think it shifts better. The Rohloff has more gears, better gear spacing, and is marketed for mtb use.
    Last edited by Eddiecycle; 11-16-2009 at 04:09 PM.

  4. #4
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    I did a 100 mile road race with my IGH (Alfine). I did it to snub the roadies. There is almost no conceivable situation were an IGH would be competative compared to a conventional setup. That doesn't mean you shouldn't try it. I ride to have fun, and an IGH is definately more fun. (BTW, it's on my FR/DH bike and survived the whole summer, including Whistler)
    Regional Race Manager, Knolly Bikes
    Washington State, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa

  5. #5
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    Ridden and raced a Rohloff for 9 years. For me, I believe the longer you go the better the IGH- 50 or 100 mile races, 24 hours, adventure races. The longer you race (or ride) the greater the chance of a mechanical with a derailleur set up, and not with a IGH. Local weekend series XC race? Derailleur wins.
    Also, I have been thinking about travelling to do longer races. If I am going to invest in doing so, I want to finish. With a IGH, unlikely that a drivetrain issue will stop me. Wouldn't want to spend time and money going to Leadville or LaRuta and not finish cuz I ripped a derailleur off. Might lose a few places due to weight, might gain some places if its muddy.

    Just my thoughts.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by crepitus
    Wouldn't want to spend time and money going to Leadville or LaRuta and not finish cuz I ripped a derailleur off. Might lose a few places due to weight, might gain some places if its muddy.
    Just my thoughts.
    If you want something that durable without the compromise of IGH friction, get one of the original SAINT derailleur's I have broken tree branches with that thing, and slammed into rocks at 25 mph. It is not invulnerable (I did break the ceramic pulley on one), but tough as nails.

    And I wouldn't do a 100 mile off road race with a hardtail, that means a tensioner of some sort. Which means that could break and ruin your day.

    That being said, I am not changing my Alfine out until it breaks (as I said, its on my DH bike)
    Regional Race Manager, Knolly Bikes
    Washington State, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdhfreethought
    If you want something that durable without the compromise of IGH friction, get one of the original SAINT derailleur's I have broken tree branches with that thing, and slammed into rocks at 25 mph. It is not invulnerable (I did break the ceramic pulley on one), but tough as nails.

    And I wouldn't do a 100 mile off road race with a hardtail, that means a tensioner of some sort. Which means that could break and ruin your day.

    That being said, I am not changing my Alfine out until it breaks (as I said, its on my DH bike)
    I rode my IGH MTB in the Cascade Cream Puff 100 this year. I ride hardtail and I had no problems.....well, no more than I would have on a FS MTB.

    However, for those who need extra padding under their bum, there are a couple of builders using a rear suspension which pivots around the BB and needs no tensioner to run a IGH system. You can also run it as a SS FS. Dare to be different. Check out the Lenz Milk Money.

  8. #8
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    I have using the Rolly for couple of years. Adds about 2-3 pounds to bike. The muddier and nastier the course, the better the IGH is. The over all selection of gears is about equal to a triple mountain set-up minus 2 gears. I took these off the bottom. I'm running 36T CR and a 16T sprocket. A 40T CR gives higher top end. I'm old and fat and the 40T is too hard to pedal some times. I have a 5" travel Titus ML, I have to use a chain tensioner and a chain guide to keep from dropping the chain. I love the Rohloff and am going to buy another one for my road tandem.

  9. #9
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    Have mine for 5 years now. trouble-less setup all the way.
    I do some 24 hour , and XC , more an enthousiast than a hardcore racer.
    I wouldn't get beck to a derailleur , never.
    I Also have a Shimano and had some Sachs before that , the Rolhoff is the 'Bees Knees'

    Like other said , small races , advantage on a derailleur setup but long stuff where you can't afford a break or muddy/snowy conditiond IGH all the way !

    In snowy conditions , the Shimano's shifting kit jams , not so with the Rolhoff. When temperature drop down under -15░C , just add a little Kerozen to liquify the oil in the Speedhub.

    The Rolhoff added 1,5 pounds to my SS HT.
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by fokof
    Have mine for 5 years now. trouble-less setup all the way.
    I do some 24 hour , and XC , more an enthousiast than a hardcore racer.
    I wouldn't get beck to a derailleur , never.
    I Also have a Shimano and had some Sachs before that , the Rolhoff is the 'Bees Knees'

    Like other said , small races , advantage on a derailleur setup but long stuff where you can't afford a break or muddy/snowy conditiond IGH all the way !

    In snowy conditions , the Shimano's shifting kit jams , not so with the Rolhoff. When temperature drop down under -15░C , just add a little Kerozen to liquify the oil in the Speedhub.

    The Rolhoff added 1,5 pounds to my SS HT.
    Thanks for all the replys.
    Couple more questions -
    The advantage in 'short' XC races - is that solely weight advantage?
    I can live with the extra weight but did you have to get used to it all being in one spot? (ie, was it really noticeable?)

    Thanks again.

    Oh, change of plans as well, now thinking about putting it on the Maverick. Anyone here done that? Got any pics?

  11. #11
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    Since IGH people won't listen to reason and experience I won't argue with them directly. Since you asked about XC advantage, I would say it would be easier to push an additional 5 lbs, than to counter the drag on an IGH. So it is doubly bad for racing as it weighs another pound itself, and the drag is essentially like another few pounds. But don't listen to me, no one else will. Buy it, then post back here on your findings. You will find the naysayers cut you down too. Can you still do epic rides? Sure. Will you ever win the Leadville 100, 24 hrs Moab etc etc. Never. I don't even think Lance could do it with an IGH. But then again, who knows.

    Answering your weight question. I do notice all that weight in the rear. Mostly on jumps, mid-air. Harder to tailwhip, etc.

    Also, I have recently ridden in -10F weather, and both the Alfine and Hammerschmidt were sluggest to shift gears. However, so was my Toyota when trying to get into 4WD. Of course, a standard derailler can back up ice and freeze in place in those conditions (new, deep powder is the worst, I think).
    Regional Race Manager, Knolly Bikes
    Washington State, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa

  12. #12
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    Yo RDH, exactly how much experience do you have? F'ing little I would say. Have you ever been in a mud race? Did you finish? If you think a couple of pounds extra is so bad, you should try twenty extra pounds for 24 hours. As for drag, Rohloff has less drag than well muddied deraileurs. If weight and drag are your main concerns, you need to ride a SS, that'll take care of the weight and drag.

  13. #13
    PeT
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdhfreethought
    Will you ever win the Leadville 100, 24 hrs Moab etc etc. Never. I don't even think Lance could do it with an IGH. But then again, who knows.
    I know -- Lance would have won and could win Leadville on an IGH-equipped bike (or on a Huffy trike). Two years ago at Leadville at the age of 47 on a Rohloff equipped bike I went ~8hrs 45min, finishing in the top 10% of the field. But what's relevant here is that I'm a nobody in the racing world -- never have been, never will be. Having an IGH didn't make it easier or harder -- but I probably was just about the only person on the trail that day who didn't care if it rained. And if it had, I probably would have taken just as long and finished in the top 5% when all those deraillered bikes in front of me failed...
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  14. #14
    dru
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    speaking of mud.....

    The hub doesn't collect mud the way a derailleur does. The picture from my last ride is pretty much as the bike was except for a fist size clump that I removed from the tire/bb/crank area. After doing this and after the mud left behind dried, the cranks wouldn't turn. The rear wheel on the other hand spins perfectly. My only beef with IGH is the weight. I certainly plan on trying the Alfine racing, in addition to my other bike.

    occasional cyclist

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