Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 101 to 150 of 198
  1. #101
    Music & Bikes
    Reputation: fokof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    977
    Quote Originally Posted by pursuiter View Post
    You're another that refuses to take any input, the only answer you allow is "Shimano sucks, buy a Rolhoff."
    I never said that.

    I still use a Shimano hub.

    I say that a Shimano IGH is designed as a Pavement product with a limit to it's torque input.
    Just read the Shimano web site.

    I say that if you want an IGH that is designed to use as a MTB , buy one that is designed for that.

    For the price , the Alfine is a very good product if used in right circumstance.
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  2. #102
    Frt Range, CO
    Reputation: pursuiter's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,570
    It's clear from the Rolhoff threads here that they're no walk in the park. Questionable quality and a very high out-of-box failure (2%~10% depending on if it's an ex-Rolhoff or current employee reporting). I stay away from Rolhoff threads now because when this fact is pointed out, you Rolhoff fan-bois go nuts.

    So choose your poison, no IGH is perfect, some cost less than others. Those with mechanical abilities get Shimano hubs to do amazing things, others that lack said skills suffer and are forced to enter the Rolhoff zone....

  3. #103
    A Man Of The Truth
    Reputation: fellsbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    324
    Quote Originally Posted by pursuiter View Post
    Those with mechanical abilities get Shimano hubs to do amazing things...
    Still waiting for you to elaborate on that meaningless statement.

  4. #104
    will rant for food
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,611
    fellsbiker, would you answer my question here about shift indicator and shifter position? Trying to help.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  5. #105
    A Man Of The Truth
    Reputation: fellsbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    324
    Yes my shifter was always in 6th gear when calibrating the yellow dots. This procedure is very simple and impossible to mess up. 6th gear is the only 'middle' gear that's marked on the shifter indicator. So it's painfully simple to make sure it's in 6th gear, then go adjust your dots.

    If adjusting the yellow dots is what pursuiter means when he refers to "mechanical abilities", then I must be a straight up genius to be able to adjust a pair of derailers, which is a much more difficult than the Alfine yellow dots.

  6. #106
    will rant for food
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,611
    Ok. I felt compelled to ask after encountering someone who didn't know about the notch. I don't believe anything is impossible to screw up, I write software for a living.

    I don't know what the heck you're doing wrong, but five repeats is fûcked up. I'm riding a second hand 8 speed hub so I can't comment on the 11. I'm using a 1.625 input ratio on a fat bike (so, 29er). I pay extremely close attention to treating the hub like a manual transmission on a car - I tend to shift after the very bottom of a pedal down stroke.

    The only thing I can comment on is the pawl design of the Shimano hubs (do some digging) is this:

    ಠ_ಠ

    ...and the price of a Rohloff:

    ಠ_ಠ
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  7. #107
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by fellsbiker View Post
    Yes my shifter was always in 6th gear when calibrating the yellow dots. This procedure is very simple and impossible to mess up. 6th gear is the only 'middle' gear that's marked on the shifter indicator. So it's painfully simple to make sure it's in 6th gear, then go adjust your dots.

    If adjusting the yellow dots is what pursuiter means when he refers to "mechanical abilities", then I must be a straight up genius to be able to adjust a pair of derailers, which is a much more difficult than the Alfine yellow dots.
    Forgive me for not wading through the whole of this thread, I came into it about halfway, but I want to ask you a question or two if I may? especially as - if you read my first post, I have had a few small problems too. I kinda bought it thinking it was a 'perfect gearing system', like you could just do whatever you wanted with the lever, at any time. However, from what the guys on here say, you have to 'look after the system'. It seems upshifting tends to be ok pretty much, but downshifts have to be accompanied with a fractional reduction of pedalling effort to enable the IGH to operate. So, when you used the Alfine 11, tell me about how you operated the control lever. Like did you ever operate it while pedalling under pressure? if so, what kind of pressure? like, were you pushing hard up a steep hill? Any insight whatsoever that may help me to understand what went wrong, I don't want to end up with a faulty unit. So, please, tell me all you can about how you used the system, especially under what conditions downshifts were undertaken. Thanks.

  8. #108
    A Man Of The Truth
    Reputation: fellsbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    324
    Early on, i would try some gentle shifts under pressure. But after the first one failed, i really babied all the rest. I would stop pedaling with one foot up and one foot down, shift, then keep pedaling. But because the shifts are nearly instant, you barley have to stop at all. And the hub has instant engagement too which also speeds the whole process up. My problem had nothing to do with shifting. My failures from what I can remember, all happened while I was simply riding around in 2nd gear.
    I would imagine that shifting under force would just accelerate the hub's failure. But they shift so quickly, that as I said, you really don't lose any momentum at all, stopping for an instant, shifting, then resuming your pedal stroke.

    ALSO I'm still waiting for pursuiter to elaborate on what this means:
    Those with mechanical abilities get Shimano hubs to do amazing things, others that lack said skills suffer and are forced to enter the Rolhoff zone....

  9. #109
    1*14*29*2.1 & 1*1*29*2.4
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,281
    translate...I am amazing...you others numbskulls have to resort to a better product

    Sorry, should have restrained myself.

  10. #110
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Corporal Punishment's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    161
    I ran across an interesting graphic recently and I wish I could find it. It showed an exploded view of the alfine hub and how each set of gears works. If I remember correctly, there are 3 sets of planetary gears that actuate off cams on the spindle when the shifter puts a gear pawl in place. 1,2,3 are actuated off 3 separate cams, 4 is a direct drive gear and there is a ring gear that puts all of them into overdrive. Actually, I'm not sure that's completely accurate because I think 5 is the direct drive. But anyway that's not the point. The point is the cam actuation.

    One thing I noticed on my A8 is that the cone nut and cone retainer nut were never properly tightened at the factory. And I don't have a cone wrench. So once in a while I've had to play with the nuts to put them back in place properly after performing maintenance, messing with the wheel off the bike, etc. If I forget to do this, the hub shell will have some play left/right on the axle.

    When that happens, its possible that if the shell/gear sets are not properly located over the axle cams, damage can occur to the pawls. I also imagine there are more of these pawls/cams crammed into the 11 speed because there are more gears and axle width is the same as the A8. Smaller pawls/cams are probably more susceptible to damage with improper cone nut placement because they're just plain smaller.

    This is a shot in the dark, but probably worth looking at when it comes to these gear issues. Yesterday I had some clicking noises in 4th gear when mashing on the pedals which went away after I adjusted the cone nut properly.

  11. #111
    Aussie Bike Bashing
    Reputation: Pinchphlat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    41
    I haven’t replied to this post for a while but I thought all of you may be interested in some of the observations I have made with both of my Alfine 11 hubs (one for commuting and one for mtb riding). My experiences may shed some light on some of the problems that have been reported with the hub.

    When I first put the Alfine 11 onto my commuter (44:20 ratio) it worked fine until a few weeks later. Then I lost my 11th gear. The rest of the gears worked fine, but not 11- the hub would just stay in 10th gear even when the shifter was in its 11 slot. No efforts with the cable, torque nut tightening etc worked. Since it was my commuting bike I wasn’t too concerned that I may end up with an Alfine 10 equipped bike.

    However, after I gave the hub its first oil change, and about 6 months after riding with the hub, I started to get the 11th hub back. It would often slip or try to shift back to 10 (an unpleasant experience) but it was there. After another month the hub shifted into the 11th gear without any trouble and has worked perfectly ever since.

    I am now encountering a similar problem with my mtb Alfine 11 hub that I fitted 6 months ago (32:21 ratio). The hub seems to be very sensitive to cable tension – two weeks ago, any downshift (but not upshifting) into 6th gear would cause a lot of slipping and free spinning of the hub. So I played with the cable tension until it went away. The next ride however resulted in the same problem for the 2nd gear and I promptly retensioned it back out. I plan to take the bike out for another ride soon to see if this is a more long term solution. I am not concerned about the Alfine 11 hub on my mtb, as this is similar to what happened with my commuter.

    However this has gotten me thinking that my problem may actually be related to the breaking in of the gears in the hub (which occurs with all IGHs). The Alfine 11s seem to be very sensitive to cable tension (even when the yellow dots are lined up), and so they may be initially at risk have lost gears/slipping issues until the gears are worn enough to accommodate a bit of play in the cable tension. So perhaps patience is the best solution?

  12. #112
    will rant for food
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,611
    Quote Originally Posted by Pinchphlat View Post
    So perhaps patience is the best solution?
    You are an accommodating person. When it comes being that way with people, cheers

    When it comes to products, I think break-in time is a bunch of ********. Yeah, there may be reasons for it, but it doesn't mean I have to like it.

    I've experienced exactly what you describe. I think the Alfine hub is pretty good with the major exception of the pawl design. This is a tough gig because most manual transmissions have a much more involved shifter that can move in several directions and receive cooperation from an independently controlled clutch. With an Alfine, all you're doing is rotating a dial to try and achieve both the shifter and the clutch action in one literally unintelligently (there is no more thinking behind it than a thumb) driven motion.

    That said, there shouldn't be a "neutral" gear when the shifting interface doesn't intentionally afford its selection. No amount of patience will ever put an "N" for neutral on your shifter.

    I'd bet a case of beer that the Di2 Alfine stuff coming out is going to be a lot more accurate. It is simply the most persnickety sensitive cable actuated anything I've encountered.

    It's just weird to me, that so much clever stuff (I mean the silent clutch freewheel? Hell yes) would go into a device, only to have it hampered by one bad design detail.

    I'd be interested to see a pawl design using rare earth magnets - you slide a powerful magnet along a shaft on the inside of a bunch of pawl sets, and otherwise sprung-inward pawls extend forcefully in accord with the magnet position. The inward spring of each pawl would be relatively weak, so if you're exerting heavy pedal pressure while trying to downshift, the engaged pawl will fail to release (as is the case now with Alfine hubs, where you have to back off a bit). However, a major difference is there would be another pawl deployed, waiting, and you'd hear a sort of very-slow-freewheel-ticking sound until you backed off the pedals. The worst that would happen when the cable gets out of tune is you'd hear some clicking of a neighboring pawl.

    If I ever get the design off the ground, I'll share information. Just too much stuff I want to get done first (and not enough money to do it with), so I'll deal with the finicky nature of my Alfine until then.

    They pissed me off so bad this summer I tried derailleurs again. NOPE, those piss me off worse still.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  13. #113
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Corporal Punishment's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    I'd be interested to see a pawl design using rare earth magnets
    Why not go for depleted uranium while you're at it? ;-)

  14. #114
    will rant for food
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,611
    Quote Originally Posted by Corporal Punishment View Post
    Why not go for depleted uranium while you're at it? ;-)
    I will totally make the first ever nuclear powered bamboo bike, a true abomination of conflicting interests.

    There may be a waiver to sign.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  15. #115
    mtbr member
    Reputation: emp?'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    173
    well i just got my hub back from warranty, shimano just replaced it with a new one after a few phone calls, so if anyone is after a cheap new 11speed hub pm me
    Josh

  16. #116
    A Man Of The Truth
    Reputation: fellsbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    324
    No thanks, 5 is plenty for me.

  17. #117
    mtbr member
    Reputation: emp?'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    173
    yeah 1 was to many for me haha
    Josh

  18. #118
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    106
    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post

    I'd be interested to see a pawl design using rare earth magnets - you slide a powerful magnet along a shaft on the inside of a bunch of pawl sets, and otherwise sprung-inward pawls extend forcefully in accord with the magnet position. The inward spring of each pawl would be relatively weak, so if you're exerting heavy pedal pressure while trying to downshift, the engaged pawl will fail to release (as is the case now with Alfine hubs, where you have to back off a bit). However, a major difference is there would be another pawl deployed, waiting, and you'd hear a sort of very-slow-freewheel-ticking sound until you backed off the pedals. The worst that would happen when the cable gets out of tune is you'd hear some clicking of a neighboring pawl.

    If I ever get the design off the ground, I'll share information. Just too much stuff I want to get done first (and not enough money to do it with), so I'll deal with the finicky nature of my Alfine until then.
    The German internal gearbox "G-Boxx 2" used magnets just as you describe.

    Universal Transmissions GmbH

  19. #119
    will rant for food
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,611
    Quote Originally Posted by evrac View Post
    The German internal gearbox "G-Boxx 2" used magnets just as you describe.

    Universal Transmissions GmbH
    That doesn't surprise me, but they won't sell me one. I've asked twice over the last year.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  20. #120
    Just Ride!
    Reputation: kustomz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,114
    Enlighten me, how do you calculate comparable gearing for this hub? I currently run a 1x9 setup that is an XT 32-11 cassette and a 34T.

  21. #121
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by kustomz View Post
    Enlighten me, how do you calculate comparable gearing for this hub? I currently run a 1x9 setup that is an XT 32-11 cassette and a 34T.
    Gear-calculator
    Last edited by irrah; 07-26-2012 at 12:03 PM. Reason: link

  22. #122
    A Man Of The Truth
    Reputation: fellsbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    324
    Quote Originally Posted by kustomz View Post
    Enlighten me, how do you calculate comparable gearing for this hub? I currently run a 1x9 setup that is an XT 32-11 cassette and a 34T.
    http://www.fellsbiker.com/docs/alfine_11_ratios.pdf

  23. #123
    Just Ride!
    Reputation: kustomz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,114
    Thanks!

  24. #124
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12
    My 5 cents worth of how I've found the alfine 11. Initially I loved it, then struggled with it, now after a warranty fix I like it again - lots. In winter time it is great to commute on. Basically It has been an up and down road with the alfine 11spd for me. Bought one of the first models produced and it ran nicely for a couple of months but then started leaking oil. To/Fro with shimano, new seals etc before they finally agreed that there was an issue with the initial run and completely replaced the internals. Since then it has been bulletproof. Wickedly good for winter commuting...A mate has a later version and he has not had the same issues I faced.He raves about it...

    Yes it's heavy but I haven't had an issue with flats on the rear even when running it on the trails. Runs stans in the rear just in case so a small puncture won't mean a whole tube change. Easier than an 8 to change a tyre. was bulletproof in a 500km 3day off road tour in particularly harsh conditions. All cassette/derailleur riders were having gear selection issues after 1st day. Alfine was fine the whole way through...

  25. #125
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12
    one last thing I forgot, chainline seems to be real important. It seems to run better with the rear cog reversed to get a chainline closer to 50mm as I run this on gt Peace 29er mtb. Don't think that would be an issue with a commuter.

    However I think shimano are shooting themselves in the foot with the narrow chainline (42.7mm) on an alfine. Is this because it's mean for a commuter/touring bike ? have been trying to convert one to a belt drive in a 29er frame and the conclusion I've come to is time to get a custom frame

  26. #126
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by kustomz View Post
    Enlighten me, how do you calculate comparable gearing for this hub? I currently run a 1x9 setup that is an XT 32-11 cassette and a 34T.
    sheldon brown's calculator has all the IGHs pre-defined

    google Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator & gears

    sorry not up to 10 posts yet so can't post the clickety-click link

  27. #127
    Frt Range, CO
    Reputation: pursuiter's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,570
    Quote Originally Posted by uzumati View Post
    one last thing I forgot, chainline seems to be real important....
    Just run it dish out, it's ~47mm. Lots of people run belts with DIY modified dropouts on standard frames.

  28. #128
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    8,794


    An update on my Alfine 11 MTB. IGH working great with a low 32T x 23T gearing. No miss shifts or other issues. Steep climbs in 1st or 2nd gear are fine. The Alfine 11 has been invisible on my bike which is how I like my drivetrains.

    Glad to have an IGH on this bike when exploring in the BC rainforest as there is a lot of dragging the bike through the bush going on!
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  29. #129
    Music & Bikes
    Reputation: fokof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    977
    Nice Shot !!!!


    Looks like it's very dry out there , bike is spankin' clean !!
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  30. #130
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    8,794
    Quote Originally Posted by fokof View Post
    Nice Shot !!!!


    Looks like it's very dry out there , bike is spankin' clean !!
    Thanks It's very dry at the moment. We get very little rain June through Aug.

    The bike is actually pretty dirty, but black and white components photograph well. I was just thinking of hosing the beast off because wheels are so filthy!
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  31. #131
    mtbr member
    Reputation: honkonbobo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    348
    my first oil 1000km oil change came and went with no issues and my (original) alfine 11 is still running smooth. it seems like it runs and shifts more smoothly after the change but that might be because i think it should (placebo effect).

    its mentioned elsewhere but for anyone that doesnt know, the rohloff oil change kit fits the alfine 11 fine and is less than a third of the price. i stuck with the alfine oil while its still under warranty just in case and i am not an oil expert but the alfine oil looked to have a much higher viscosity than the rohloff. maybe someone in the know can comment on their interchangeability.

  32. #132
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    3
    I have an 11 speed on my commuter and I'll agree that it's a lot weaker than the 8. I was running a very tall setup (52T cainring and 16T sprocket) and the first hub completely failed at 500 miles. I still have my second hub. It first crapped out at around 300 miles. I took it apart and found lots of metal from break-in had packed into the sprocket wheels where the pawls lock in to engage a gear. I cleaned out the hub and refilled it with a thicker oil (mobil 75-90 synthetic gear lube) and it behaved with no further issues for about 2,000 miles.

    My route changed and now includes some actual hills, so I changed my chainring for a 36T. After that it went back to the usual skipping, popping, jumping out of gear. If it weren't for using clipless pedals, I probably would have broken an ankle several times over by now from the pedals falling away from my feet.

    For me 10th gear has been weakest. Or at least the first to go. Now the hub is popping out of all gears if I push hard enough. I think this hub just does not do well with a lot of torque. I tend to ride in too high a gear with low cadence and mashing the pedals. I've met a couple of others with them who have had no trouble and when I ride with them they spin a much higher cadence than I do and stay in the saddle. I don't consider myself an especially strong rider, either. If you take a hub apart you'll see just how small an area the pawl has to catch on. It takes only a small amount of contamination or damage in that small area to cause a slip.

    I put nearly 10k on my old 8-speed before I had any trouble at all and my experience with washing this one out to ease shifting issues makes me think washing out my old 8-speed might solve my problems with it.

    When people ask me I advise against the 11spd.

    I think I'll save up for a rohloff. Considering the expense of the 11, the additional price jump to a rohloff from here doesn't feel as bad as the price jump from a traditional setup.

  33. #133
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    710
    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Let's assume 20% is accurate....then 80% of the hubs are trucking along just fine. So if you got 5 bad hubs in a row that would be really bad luck.
    If that's your thought process on equipment, then please don't design anything for public consumption. Ever.

  34. #134
    will rant for food
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,611
    Quote Originally Posted by OneBadWagon View Post
    If that's your thought process on equipment, then please don't design anything for public consumption. Ever.
    "just fine" != "is fine"

    I think his point was more about the unlikelihood of getting that many defective hubs in a row based on a 20% failure rate. I'm not a statistician, though.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  35. #135
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    9
    I'am choose between Alfine 8 and Alfine 11. My goal - 500 kilometers in the other country. So, if a hub breaks, then I find myself in a very difficult situation.

    Alfine 8 is more simple, but 11 have liquid oil, sealed and since it is Shimano best hub, i think, that they pay maximum attention to the quality.

    Which of this hub is more reliable?

    P.S. Can i install 180mm brake rotor to Alfine? Or only 160?

  36. #136
    A Man Of The Truth
    Reputation: fellsbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    324
    It seems like the 8 is much more reliable, from what I've heard.

  37. #137
    dru
    dru is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,443
    Can't comment on the 11 because I don't own one, but my 8 has been bullet proof. As for rotors, it's no problem running a 180mm.

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

  38. #138
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    3
    I want to build my own bike with a single speed frame. My question is if I can use the alfine 8 or 11 with a shimano tiple 8 speed STI lever R500. A road shift gear, as I'm using a road handelbars.
    Thanks for the input

  39. #139
    will rant for food
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,611
    Quote Originally Posted by Davidbike View Post
    I want to build my own bike with a single speed frame. My question is if I can use the alfine 8 or 11 with a shimano tiple 8 speed STI lever R500. A road shift gear, as I'm using a road handelbars.
    Thanks for the input
    Nope, use a Versa brand Alfine shifter. Or a Jtek bar end shifter.

    Versa 11

    Jtek
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  40. #140
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    3
    Thanks good finding

  41. #141
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    26

    I've been running this AM build with an Alfine 11 running a 26-20 primary drive for the last year without any issues. When it jumps out of gear, it's always because the cable isn't correctly adjusted.

    My worst problem was a few weeks ago when the shifting froze up during a ride in deep snow.

  42. #142
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    486
    I reckon reading this thread helped me fork out the extra for my Rohloff. I was initially keen to go the half price route and get a Shimano 11 speed but I'm a little less than interested in hubs with what appears to be a much higher failure rate than any of my other cycling purchased products. Good luck to those who give it a go but I decided to break the bank by getting the German product. Now to find the money to build it into a wheel. I think If I couldnt have scrapped up the funds for the Rohloff I would have got another dualdrive hub for my Ogre build like my Moulton bicycle has. Its never given a moments issue and has done a tour from New South Wales to Perth Australia problem free towing a heavy trailer.

  43. #143
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    12
    Check out CyclepathNW's web site. They did a Di2 Gates build recently.

  44. #144
    Music & Bikes
    Reputation: fokof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    977
    Quote Originally Posted by cathar View Post

    My worst problem was a few weeks ago when the shifting froze up during a ride in deep snow.
    Same here

    -30°C this morning , the spring isn't strong enough to move it back


    EDIT: I'm on an 8 not an 11
    Last edited by fokof; 01-24-2013 at 09:32 PM.
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  45. #145
    Tires
    Reputation: Gritter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    525

    Æleven lead me through each gentle...

    Quote Originally Posted by fokof View Post
    Same here

    -30°C this morning , the spring isn't strong enough to move it back
    Same here too. I took my Æleven out for its maiden voyage yesterday, but it was merely 14ºF, which I would have never thought would be too cold for gears. After about forty minutes, my brand new hub started slipping. You can imagine my disappointment, but when I looked down, I noticed how slowly the spring was returning the cassette-joint when I would trigger it. It wasn't caked with snow and ice or anything, just cold, I guess.

    After it warmed up inside my house, shifting is perfect up on the work-stand. Only one disappointing ride under my belt with the Alf'd Æleven so far, and I'm not ready to give up yet. I had the best luck with the first Nexus 7, that thing was great, so I had high hopes for this Alf, since it's some four generations evolved, but my Nexus 7 never got too cold to shift.

    EDIT: It was just as cold today, but the Æleven ran like a scolded dog. I'm pretty sure it was that new cable stretch phenomenon, as I adjusted it up to snuff and aligned the yellow marks as perfectly as I possibly could.

    The spring seems to return slower in the cold, but it didn't affect my shifts on day two. Since it worked perfectly today, I love it.

    The space between 1st and 2nd seems like a pretty large gap to me, leaving 1st as my "Bail-Out-Gear". I often find myself searching for 1.5, and going between 1st and 2nd a couple times, before settling for 2nd. So far, 1 through 5 is for inclines and 6 through 11 are for downhill (on tarmac).

    I'm running 33t x 23t on a 29'er w/180mm crank arms. Dry weight is 39 lbs, but that's just going to go up.

    I love how silent my geared drivetrain is. I plan on changing the oil a lot. I doubt I'll wait until 1000 kilometers, since the "break-in" of new gears dirtiest the oil the most in the beginning. I'll probably change the oil at fifty miles, then at 250, 500, then probably every thousand. Automatic Transmission Fluid is cheap, although I plan on using Rohloff Oil until I make a solid decision to go with ATF, from reading other peoples' anecdotes.
    Last edited by Gritter; 01-24-2013 at 09:30 PM.
    Soma, Surly, Salsa, Schwalbe, SRAM, Sun-Ringlé

  46. #146
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    101
    So if money was not a consideration, only reliability, would you go rohl or alpine?

  47. #147
    mtbr remember
    Reputation: BikeSATORI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    4,351
    interesting read... currently considering building up a rear wheel for one of my singlespeeders... just subscribing for the info!
    Schralp it Heavy.

  48. #148
    Gravity Rides Everything
    Reputation: endurowanker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,127
    Quote Originally Posted by fellsbiker View Post
    I got my first Alfine 11 one year ago. My 5th Alfine 11 is on the way. Sadly, I do not have 5 bikes. They just keep failing. Sometimes after a few months of great use, sometimes after a few miles (#4 failed after about 6 miles). One was bad out of the box and the bike shop sent it back without me even riding the bike. In every other way, they are great and I love them! But the average life span seems to be about 2 or 3 months. That's a pretty short life for a wheel that ends up costing you close to $1000 all said and done.

    maybe time for a rohloff.. ouch.

  49. #149
    A Man Of The Truth
    Reputation: fellsbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    324
    Quote Originally Posted by endurowanker View Post
    maybe time for a rohloff.. ouch.
    Rohloff isn't a great option, based on its very high cost, and terrible shifters. There are 3rd party shifters, which of course raise the price even more. Hopefully someday (soon), someone will make a hub that is exactly what the Alfine 11 was supposed to be. A cheap, mass produced internal hub with good enough gear range, good enough reliability, and good enough price, all with the features people want these days, like non rapid-rise trigger shifters and 36h hubs with disc mounts. Shimano tried and failed miserably, but its still without a doubt, the future of mountain biking.

  50. #150
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    8,794


    I built up this Alfine 11 29er wheel last January. This year I moved it to a new frame and took it out for a shake out bike camping trip in the mountains:

    Missing Link Tour - a set on Flickr



    So far so good.... The hub is working great with no issues. It's geared 32T x 23T. I've got a lot of bikepacking trips planned for 2013 so I'll give it some more abuse riding with a load in the mountains a well as some more trail riding.

    It's nice having a clean IGH setup when clambering over blowdown or hike-a-biking through the brush...I don't have to think about bending or ripping off my derailleur.

    I also like the fact it's silent when coasting and bouncing down rough terrain at speed.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •