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Thread: QR for Alfine?

  1. #1
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    QR for Alfine?

    I'm new to IGH in general & in doing some online research to find out what a "Monkey Bone" was came across a UK thread mentioning a neat QR system designed by Whyte called "Big Gripper". I know this is probably a long shot, but does anyone have any experience with it?

  2. #2
    Rohloff
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sometimes
    I'm new to IGH in general & in doing some online research to find out what a "Monkey Bone" was came across a UK thread mentioning a neat QR system designed by Whyte called "Big Gripper". I know this is probably a long shot, but does anyone have any experience with it?
    The Big Gripper is a 20mm through axel quick release system for the rear wheel. The Alfine is not 20mm. This will not work on the Alfine. I'm not aware of any QR for the Alfine, but it's really not a big deal. I just use one of these:

    https://shop.sunrisecyclery.com/item/14310/

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    Here's someone in the UK who's done so fairly recently. Go down to "ade ward"s post near the bottom of the thread.

    As for wrenches, I had in mind this:

    http://aebike.com/page.cfm?action=de...=30&SKU=TL8349

    or preferably this:

    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...:referralID=NA

  4. #4
    Rohloff
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sometimes
    Here's someone in the UK who's done so fairly recently. Go down to "ade ward"s post near the bottom of the thread.
    He reports getting it to work after messing around with it. Maybe there's some 20mm TA type bolt that fits on the treads or he rigged something else up. I don't know. The Big Gripper is interesting but seems like a non-standard solution to very minor issue. I remember not liking the idea of the Alfine being bolt on, but now that I have it, I kind of like it. Other than having a very thin wrench in my pack, it's pretty much a non-issue.

  5. #5
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    From my understanding there's a "bobbin" that can be retrofitted to any standard diameter axle, whether solid or QR.

  6. #6
    vik
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    I've taken my Alfine off my bike 2-3 times in the since I got it in Dec '08. The bolt on hassle is overrated. Puling the wheel and retensioning it in horizontal dropouts takes a few moments and is a breeze.

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    This may seem strange to write, but I prefer the security of a skewer. Shimano only. I just don't believe that it's possible to secure the wheel as well turning two nuts. Practically, I don't think that nuts can equal the clamping force of a well-designed skewer. By practically I mean short of having a big-a$$ wrench & torqueing the he!! out of the nuts. And, I for one, am not going to be carrying a big-a$$ wrench with me on my bike. Obviously, just my opinion.

  8. #8
    dru
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    Seriously, use a big ass wrench. Preferably of the Torque variety. The bolts need to be as tight as those on old school square taper cranks. I tighten mine to 25 ft/lbs of torque, which is the middle of the recommended range.

    I really doubt a skewer will hold the wheel as tightly to be honest.

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

  9. #9
    vik
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sometimes
    This may seem strange to write, but I prefer the security of a skewer. Shimano only. I just don't believe that it's possible to secure the wheel as well turning two nuts. Practically, I don't think that nuts can equal the clamping force of a well-designed skewer. By practically I mean short of having a big-a$$ wrench & torqueing the he!! out of the nuts. And, I for one, am not going to be carrying a big-a$$ wrench with me on my bike. Obviously, just my opinion.
    I think I can get my Alfine nuts quite a bit tighter than a QR skewer with a decent wrench at home. In the field I can still get 'em pretty darn tight with a smaller wrench and I would retighten them with something bigger when I had the first opportunity.

    If you are using vertical dropouts you don't really need the axle/QR to be uber tight.....if you have horizontal dropouts like my Pugsley than keeping the nuts tight is essential to stop the IGH from getting pulled forward in the dropouts under heavy load.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sometimes
    This may seem strange to write, but I prefer the security of a skewer. Shimano only. I just don't believe that it's possible to secure the wheel as well turning two nuts. Practically, I don't think that nuts can equal the clamping force of a well-designed skewer. By practically I mean short of having a big-a$$ wrench & torqueing the he!! out of the nuts. And, I for one, am not going to be carrying a big-a$$ wrench with me on my bike. Obviously, just my opinion.
    If you asked around the SS forum I don't think you would find any experienced people who would agree. Bolt-on hubs are more secure than a skewer, Shimano or not, for horizontal dropout frames and you don't need a huge wrench to achieve it. A skewer can be made to work sufficiently only if used in combination with a chain tug otherwise high torque will cause axle slippage.

  11. #11
    Bike Dork
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sometimes
    This may seem strange to write, but I prefer the security of a skewer. Shimano only.
    It's all in your head. Bolts are much stronger than any QR.
    There's a real reason bolt-on wheels are REQUIRED on the track.

  12. #12
    Frt Range, CO
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    Just like this thread, I still jerk-off frequently, I can tighten my bolts with a short wrench just fine!

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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    If you asked around the SS forum I don't think you would find any experienced people who would agree. Bolt-on hubs are more secure than a skewer, Shimano or not, for horizontal dropout frames and you don't need a huge wrench to achieve it. A skewer can be made to work sufficiently only if used in combination with a chain tug otherwise high torque will cause axle slippage.
    I don't have any experience with rear-facing horizontal 'dropouts'.

    The only thing remotely close to those that I've used have been a near horizontal front-facing 'dropout' on an old touring frame & I never had any issue with it using a skewer.

    As far as ATB frames. the only issue I've ever read about concerning skewers has been with titanium frames & the standard recommendation there is to use a good quality skewer. Which is what I did with both of my ti frames & never had a problem with axle slippage.

    FWIW, I raced at the expert level for quite a few years on steel, aluminum, titanium & carbon framed bikes on very technically demanding terrain in races that averaged about two hours so I wasn't JRA with any of my ATB bikes with skewers.

    I'll stick with my skewers (no pun intended).

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sometimes
    I don't have any experience with rear-facing horizontal 'dropouts'.

    The only thing remotely close to those that I've used have been a near horizontal front-facing 'dropout' on an old touring frame & I never had any issue with it using a skewer.

    As far as ATB frames. the only issue I've ever read about concerning skewers has been with titanium frames & the standard recommendation there is to use a good quality skewer. Which is what I did with both of my ti frames & never had a problem with axle slippage.

    FWIW, I raced at the expert level for quite a few years on steel, aluminum, titanium & carbon framed bikes on very technically demanding terrain in races that averaged about two hours so I wasn't JRA with any of my ATB bikes with skewers.

    I'll stick with my skewers (no pun intended).
    I was only talking about securing a wheel in a horizontal "dropout" against slippage, which I guess I assumed you had.

    For vertical dropouts I have absolutely nothing against QR skewers.

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