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  1. #1
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    High End, Lightweight, Disc, 3-speed IGH

    First off, I'm sorry if this question has come up before. I have done some searching and this has turned into a "Someone needs to invent this" type of question in my mind but I wanted to ask anyway. I would be very interested in a high-end, lightweight, 3-speed, 32h disc hub. I remember the old 3-speed hubs like on my BMX bike or my parent's townie bikes and they seemed like they were pretty compact even with a drum coaster and I was just hoping I could get something that would increase the range of my SS but not add a whole lot of weight or other complications. Does anyone know of anything like this? I say high end because the ones I've found that look somewhat close like the Shimano Nexus Inter-3 (SG-3D55) are pretty inexpensive. Is that pretty much my best bet or have any boutique brands caught on to this niche market and made an offering yet?

  2. #2
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    I would go for a light weight 3 speed based off this:



    It's the Nuvinci, too bad they arn't taking it in that direction.

    I just ordered an i-motion 3speed to satisfy my IGH curiosity, and of corse it weighs the most out of the 3speed options, being, sram, sturmy, and shimano. The latter being the only hub having both disc and 32h options.

  3. #3
    hmmm.
    Reputation: David9999999's Avatar
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    From what I've seen, the Nexus Inter-3 is definitely your best bet. Lightest, disc ready.. no one seems to have reviewed one, though. I was thinking of getting one myself, actually.

  4. #4
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    bennymack, perhaps you would consider a dual speed crankset like the Hammerschmidt, or, my favourite, the Schumpf. Both have two ratios that are either 1:1 or 1:1.6, that like having a big ring and a middle ring, or whatever difference of ten teeth you desire.

    They are both about $700+.

    They both weigh about the same, but the Schlumpf has no gear cables because you shift with a button on the crankset (i've used one and it is easier than it sounds and there are no accidental shifts once you are used to it). Obvisouly the setupis AS simple as a SS setup.

    Check out the Schlumpf, it will blow your mind. I've used one and the two ratios were all I need to get up hills a little too steep for a SS but still have another ratio that covers the very fast speeds where a SS is of no use but to coast.

    PM me if you want more details.

  5. #5
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    AFAIK there are exactly two 3-speed IGHs that are disc brake compatable.

    The Shimano SG-3D55 is a standard Shimano Nexus 3-speed mechanism updated in an alloy shell with a roller clutch replacing the final output freewheel ratchet. Slack cable is low gear and the shift comes out the right end of the axle through a standard Shimano 3-speed bell-crank. It accepts a centerlock disc and has 32 spoke holes and a 135mm OLD. I believe these are made in Shimano's Singapore factory. I think the only available shifter is Shimano's "Revo" twist grip. I'm seeing a $125 retail discount price for the hub, shifter an extra $19.

    The SRAM iMotion 3 Disc is a recent design with the shift cable exiting the hub between the cog and drop-out (inboard of the frame). Slack cable is low gear and shifts are almost instantaneous. It accepts a std. six bolt disc and has 36 spoke holes and a 130mm OLD. These are made in SRAM's factory in Germany. The only shifter I'm aware of is SRAM's iMotion3 twist grip. I'm seeing a $100 retail discount price for the hub, shifter an extra $10.

    I think either of these hubs will last for decades and tens of thousands of miles, but probably neither is up to full-on mountainbike abuse.

    HTH

  6. #6
    Compressorman
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    I have an little used I-Motion 3 disc laced to a Mavic EX729, wrapped with a 26" Weirwolf LT 2.55 tire I would sell you. I even have the shifter, grips and cable for it. If you're interested, pm me and I'll send you some photos.
    JW

  7. #7
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    Bump!

    Quote Originally Posted by john_dalhart
    AFAIK there are exactly two 3-speed IGHs that are disc brake compatable.
    Here's a third: the SRAM DualDrive Disc. Although intended to be used with a full 8 or 9 speed cassette and special dual-control shifters on small-wheeled bikes, you don't have to. Much as singlespeeders regularly do with ordinary cassette hubs, you can put on a single cassette cog and fill out rest of the the freehub with spacers.

    I have been commuting on a DualDrive Disc set up this way every winter since 2004. A BIG plus of this hub is that the internally geared part takes the same cable pull as most old-school 3-speed hubs, so if you're not running a cassette and don't need dual controls you can use just about any old 3-speed shifter. I used a NOS Sachs 3-speed shifter with the hub for several years and it worked great. (Currently running drop bars and using an 8-speed barcon that I shift 2 clicks at a time -- not recommended for novices, but I'm very comfortable with it and the cable pull works perfectly in practice).

    I don't need to sell this group on the benefits of IGHs, but I have to rave. I'm wrapping up my sixth winter of commuting on the DualDrive Disc and still have yet to do any maintenance on it whatsoever. It is very efficient for an IGH and upshifting is instantaneous. The combination of IGH and discs makes for a truly all-weather, no-maintenance, always ready-to-ride commuter bike. All in all it is one of the most awesome pieces of cycling gear that I have owned.

    Truth be told, I don't run this thing with a a single cog. I use two cogs and two chainrings (what singlespeeders refer to as a "dingle" setup) so I can change the overall gear range for both commuting (38:18 cassette:cog ratio) and occasional mountain biking (34:22). I haven't done a ton of mountain biking with it but I have hauled it up 15% grades on a number of occasions at low speed and high torque, in low gear with the external ratio at 34x22 and it has never complained.

    Specs: Around $300-320 these days, weight allegedly about 1000g (never weighed mine), 135mm OLD, 36h only, cable routes into a $20 external plastic clickbox, can be used in horizontal or vertical dropouts but dropouts must extend at least 3-4mm past the axle to catch the anti-turn washers, slack cable is low gear. Ratios 0.73, 1.00 and 1.36.
    Last edited by GlowBoy; 03-30-2010 at 10:47 PM.
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

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