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  1. #1
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well Help with Alfine assembly... confused!

    I'm trying to finish up my project with alfine rear hub.

    I'm following instructions HERE for putting sprocket and shift mechanism on. The problem I'm running into is the following:

    After step 2, placing the cog on the hub. It seems like theres still space for a 2nd cog? or a spacer? or the guard? I did not use the Alfine specified sprocket CS-S500 and instead opted for a 19T which does not have the guard.

    So if i look from the top down (rim, sprocket, shift mechanism, nut) at the bike I see the following: Slot for the sprocket (has a few notches to allow sprocket to slide down), A second slot (what goes here?), A third slot ( i think the snap ring goes here?), then the driver cap and shift mechanism.

    So I'm wondering if a) i'm missing a part or b) does that snap ring they mention go into that extra slot between the sprocket and the end. I assembled it minus the missing part but then the cog just wiggles around inside.

    I might need to take a close up if this doesnt make sense.

    thanks for any help in advance!

  2. #2
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    Should go together like the instructions you are following. Did you put the chain guard and dust cap on in step 1? After that, slide the cog on and the snap ring will sit in slot just above it. The snap ring should sit in the outermost slot that has notches. The cog should not fit "into" a slot, but should ride over a slot (if this makes sence), so that the notches on the cog fit into the notches on the hub. Might need pictures if your still confussed.

    The chain guard that comes attached to some Shimano cogs attaches further out on the diameter of the cog, so it doesn't effect the assembly.

  3. #3
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    yup it makes sense. I kind of thought thats how it went together but had one hell of a time putting that snap ring into the 2nd slot right after the cog. I will try again later and see if I can do it.

  4. #4
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    I struggled with it my first time.

    I like to lay the snap ring flat against the outside, there is a little lip that it sits against. Then I can pry one end of the ring over and into the slot, while keeping the rest of the ring flat. Then just walk it around, using the next notch to work the screwdriver.

    I also carry an extra snap ring and a small screwdriver in my pack so I can do all this on-trail.

  5. #5
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    I got it.. it looks almost impossible but after some prying with a screwdriver it went in.. I'm not sure I understand why shimano decided to secure the sprocket like this.. shimano if you're listening this is a really crappy way to secure the sprocket!

  6. #6
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    Its easy once you get used to it. I can change out cogs in less then 2 minutes now. Use a precision flathead scewdriver to snap it on and off.

  7. #7
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    that snap ring is a *****.

  8. #8
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    Anyone know if the Alfine 11-spd will use the same snap ring?

  9. #9
    Another Retro Grouch
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    Let's hope they do. It's a 100 year old system that has worked very well over the years. I changed my first spocket in 5th grade and didn't have any issues back then, none today. Many spockets available from several vendors. If Shimano uses some new system we'll probably be waiting for a couple years to get new spockets. Be careful what you wish for....

  10. #10
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    Fair enough, it is very easy once you've done it. I'm more concerned about durability. I popped the snap ring off while riding, hence my carrying a spare and proper tool to replace in the field. I dialed in my chainline since then, but it was only off by 2mm when that happened.

    I would imagine Shimano could design a locking nut that could be used with the current sprockets.

  11. #11
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    Maybe something like this...

    http://surlybikes.com/parts/lockring/

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surly29
    ...I popped the snap ring off while riding....
    Interesting, I've never seen one pop off in many years as a bike mechanic. I suspect user error but we can never be sure. I don't see any need for a change, it'll be incompatiable with everything else, because a few nubes have trouble...why bother?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by pursuiter
    Interesting, I've never seen one pop off in many years as a bike mechanic. I suspect user error but we can never be sure. I don't see any need for a change, it'll be incompatiable with everything else, because a few nubes have trouble...why bother?
    How will using a track lockring make everything incompatible? You can easily replace the groove where the snap ring now sits with threads. Cut the same 3 notches for existing Nexus cogs and put a lockring over that.

    Much stronger, and us Newb's who know nothing about being a bike machanic will have nothing to worry about.

  14. #14
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    Snap ring was easy.

    I got the snapring on pretty easily with a little screwdriver, but how do you get it off?
    The hard or impossible thing for me was to get the "right hand dust cap B" on. I got it all the way to the groove next to the groove it belongs in before I completely ruined it.
    Is there a technique or special or homemade tool to install this seal properly? I'm confounded, and I also have to find a place to get these small parts. I think that I'll need several before I get it on right.

  15. #15
    Another Retro Grouch
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    Quote Originally Posted by alhoff
    ....The hard or impossible thing for me was to get the "right hand dust cap B" on. I got it all the way to the groove next to the groove it belongs in before I completely ruined it....
    I think you mean "Driver Cap", the inner seal for the cassette joint. If that is the case, the secret that I use is the seal's cupping faces inward towards the sprocket even though my instincts want the cupping to face outward towards the dropout.

  16. #16
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    Achh!

    Well Mr. Pursuiter you were correct! I ordered replacements and I was trying to install the driver cap to the position that right hand dust capl is supposed to occupy. That explains why it was so hard to fit. I didn't have the right hand dust cap originally and the pieces look the same on the assembly instructions.
    Thanks

  17. #17
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    For the user that had their snap ring come off...

    I used a trick Sheldon Brown suggested. Give the ring a small tap with a flathead screwdriver and a mallet to make sure the ring is full seated. I started on the side opposite to the opening in the ring and then a couple more taps as I worked towards the opening.
    MCM #269

    "Lightweight , durable , inexpensive
    Pick 2."

  18. #18
    dru
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    there's a tool for every job.....

    Snap ring pliers work great on that very evil ring. Mine almost took my eye out as it flew away. I don't know why Shimano doesn't put holes in the ends of the ring like everyone else does....

    Still though, snap ring pliers work great, just cover things up with a rag since it is a sure thing that the ring will slip off the ends of the pliers and go flying off somewhere.

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by dru
    ...I don't know why Shimano doesn't put holes in the ends of the ring like everyone else does....
    These snap ring and sprockets have been used by Sturmey Archer, Sachs, Bendix, etc for over 100 years.

  20. #20
    dru
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    Quote Originally Posted by dru
    I don't know why Shimano doesn't put holes in the ends of the ring like everyone else does....
    Everyone else meaning all the car manufacturers I can think of, transmissions, forks, industrial equipment, etc

    OT, Pursuiter, how's that oil bath holding up? I just adjusted the non-drive side cones because there was a bit of play and now the hub is slightly noisier than before. I'm thinking it needs the bath. I've got~2500 km on it now for sure.

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

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