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  1. #1
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    gates belt drive eccentric bottom bracket vs. sliding dropout

    I'm having a custom bike built with a Gates Center Track and Rohloff hub. I can have either an eccentric BB or a sliding droput but have not a clue as to why I might wish one over the other.

    I would greatly appreciate feedback as to the pros and cons of either approach. I would also appreciate advice as to the advisability of using a quick release with this system

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Eccentric BB suits a 'Rohloff' oem drop out for a mini torque arm. Mudguards can be fitted as the wheel will not move. Rim brakes are set up once.
    Seating position may need to be slightly adjustable as rotating the EBB will tension the chain and move the pedal position a bit.
    I reckon this suits a touring/expedition bike with mudguards and v-brakes.

    Sliding dropout will leave the seating/pedalling position fixed.
    Mudguards and rim brakes may need to be set up again after a chain retension.
    I reckon this suits a mountain bike with no mudguards and disk brakes.

    Just my opinions.

  3. #3
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    Thanks, this will have disk brakes and no mudguards. It's a Fargo type bike design.

  4. #4
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    edsterra - where are you getting the centertrack parts from? When I tried, Rohloff refused point blank to sell these if the frame wasnt gates approved or tested or whatever.

  5. #5
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    This is true, I'm looking at Seven who is approved, or soon will be. However, it is turning into enough of a hassle that I'm reconsidering. The Rohloff is what I really want, the Gates looked interesting but isn't a deal breaker. With the straight chainline, and the fact that I'd use a stronger chain, the chain would really work just fine and be much less pain in the butt if I have a flat.

  6. #6
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    The main positive in my head for EBB is that when adjusting tension, you don't have to examine that the wheel is staying straight. With sliding dropouts, you could have one side a few mm forward relative to the other, and the wheel won't be straight.

    Less fiddling, basically. But, the misalignment issue with sliding dropouts is less of a problem than I describe. It's not too difficult, just a bit futzy. And once you set it, you won't adjust it for a long time, if ever.

    Sliding dropouts offer more adjustment range.

    Belt is no problem when having a flat... I change tires often on my bike, and it hasn't been an issue. Belt is indeed a nuisance if the belt breaks, and you have to do the rear triangle separation dance.

    If you are sensitive about noise and have the cash to spend on a Rohloff, go with a belt! I like mine. Very quiet.
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    If you are sensitive about noise and have the cash to spend on a Rohloff, go with a belt! I like mine. Very quiet.
    I'm thinking about a belt too for my next built , do you know if it's heavier than a chain setup?

    The chainring/cog looks heavier ......
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by fokof View Post
    I'm thinking about a belt too for my next built , do you know if it's heavier than a chain setup?

    The chainring/cog looks heavier ......
    It's quite a bit lighter, actually. The cogs are feather weight and the belt is something in the 70 to 90 gram range if I remember right.
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  9. #9
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    Chain and sprockets weigh 464 gms



    Belt and sprockets weigh 254 gms

    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  10. #10
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    Thanx

    I'm convinced !
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  11. #11
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    The centertrack belt drive is even lighter I believe.

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