Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 56
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,227

    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! 2011 Interbike Dirt Demo

    As always, I like to start these mini reviews/impressions with a disclaimer. We get only 30-60 minutes on any of these bikes and even with the technician at the booth setting up the suspension for our weight and then fiddling with it some out on the trail I know that it would take a day or two of riding (maybe more) to get things really set up so that they are working anywhere close to perfection for our weight and riding style. In some cases bar, stem, seat, and tire selection had an adverse affect on our impression of the bike. Although, this year I think all the tires worked pretty well in the Bootleg conditions.

    Some bikes were brand spanking new (We were absolutely the first ones to throw a leg over some) and in other cases they had been thrashed about a bit and the fork and shock seals were starting to be affected by the fine Bootleg talc so as to influence our impression as well. So, please, don’t interpret these views as anything but that. Just a couple of hacks first impressions.

    We were disappointed to find that many of our favorite vendors ( Turner, Knolly, Niner, Banshee, Ventana, Titus, and Transition among others) chose not attend the Dirt Demo this year, but even so, we were able to demo around 20 bikes and get to some bike companies that we normally overlook. If you do the math, with 16 hours of demo time, that's less than 1 hour per bike. Not a lot of time to really get to know a bike, but it is surprising what you can determine in a short ride.


    Some general observations:
    -Reverb! This post was on almost every bike we rode and they all worked flawlessly. It's amazing how this one item has become almost required equipment of late. No complaints here. I'm addicted to my adjustable seatpost crutch.

    -Carbon: It's everwhere. It's light. It's stiff. We didn't even break any this time around..... although I think they had a "Most Wanted Poster" of Russell at the Santa Cruz booth.

    -2x10: It's taken over. Almost every bike we rode was running 10 speed cassettes and most had a double chain ring. It works just fine but did take some getting used to which combos provided the right ratios.

    -Black is the new Black: I was surprised to see so many all black color schemes. Very sharp imo.

    -Most all the bikes we rode were set up well, adjusted well, and had mid to top level components hanging on their frames. No demo fleet beaters here.

    Enough of that. Russell, Randy, and I left Ely at 4:30 am Monday morning with our sights set on Boulder City. After dropping our bikes off at my father-in-law's up in Logandale we headed down the Lake Mead Shoreline road through the Valley of Fire to make it to Bootleg Canyon by 8:30.

    By 9:00 we were at the first tents jonesing for bikes.


    Intense Carbine: Carbon fiber 5 inch trail bike

    "State of the art engineering and technology, along with the vision and design of Jeff Steber, has culminated in the production of our most alluring and inspired mountain bike design to date. "We combined the best of the best" says Steber, "American design with German engineering."

    Intense employed the services of German firm, SEED Engineering to match its vision with their expertise in carbon-fiber product development and engineering.

    The brains behind SEED come from years of experience in carbon fiber manufacturing. “We use all the great technology there is, but especially keep a focus on providing the best product”, says SEED engineer, Thomas Harter.

    The outcome is remarkable: a do-it-all trail bike with a dual personality. "We took the original DNA of the famous Tracer VP and re-designed and improved it using carbon fiber construction”, says Steber.

    The Carbine is proving to be Intense’s best all-around trail bike. The combination of the properties of carbon fiber and the magic of patented VPP suspension makes the new Carbine a segment leader."

    There's the marketing hype straight off the Intense web page. Here's our impression. The Carbine is insanely light and stiff. It felt like it would practically levitate up hills... as long as they weren't too rough. The set up was decidedly more XC than AM with narrow bars and Fox 32 fork (you could get it with the 36 float as well but they were all out by time I got there).

    I don't know if it was the early start that morning or the fact that I've been mostly riding slacker plusher more AM type bikes lately, but the Carbine felt a bit too skittish on any technical climbing stuff. I uphill endoed on a small rock feature when the front wheel got hung up with my weight too far foreword, logging my first crash of the Demo within 200 yards of the trailhead. I didn't feel any discernable pedal kickback on these same sections nor did I feel any lateral flex when mashing hard on the pedals. This would be a great endurance racer or multi-day stage race bike.

    Slow technical stuff is not its strength, but get it up to speed and pound through the medium rough stuff and it was solid..... not plush mind you, but it didn't deflect, rattle, flex, or stray off line. Throw a light 160 air fork on there and I think the downhill performance would be Super D worthy as well.

    DSC00853

    Pretty decent tire clearance but not huge... and a sticker you're going to see a lot less of this year (In case that means anything to you).
    DSC00854

    Carbon bars and xtr brakes where both light and effective.
    DSC00856

    DSC00858

    I really liked this 611 seat by SQlab. Never heard of them, but it was light and comfy. Kinda shaped like the WTB Silverado but with much better padding and not quite as flat.
    DSC00857


    Diamondback Mission Pro: 6" All-Mountain

    The Mission Pro was a heavy duty 6" am bike that felt more at home descending than climbing. It seemed to bob some while pedaling but was very plush and flex-free on the rough Bootleg descents. According to the Diamondback site, "The Knuckle Box is shaped in such a way that the wheel rate starts off linear and finishes slightly progressive. This results in great small bump compliance, more perceived travel and a great bottom out protection." This sounds about right. The linearity of the initial stroke may be what was responsible for the bob, yet gave it the plush feeling over repeated small to medium sized rocks. Maybe we should've tried the propedal switch while climbing, but I think the design is somewhat flawed if you need the propedal to keep the bike from bobbing.

    It had an unforgivable amount of chain slap. It seems like manufacturers would have this one figured out by now. No one wants to listen to that racket while descending a fun rocky stretch of singletrack.

    The build quality looked to be on par with the Giants and GTs of the bike world but long term testing would be the only way to know how it will hold up.

    DSC00860

    DSC00859

    We really liked the Hayes Prime brakes. Very adjustable with excellent stopping power and feel. The Haven bars and stem were very comfortable and seemed to put us in a good position for AM type bombing.
    DSC00861

    Having the "Knucklebox" rocker folded up like this looks like it might create a high leverage ratio, but it didn't feel like it and the low position helps lower the center of gravity.
    DSC00864

    Haven wheels, XO derailleur.... all top shelf stuff.
    DSC00863


    Ibis Mojo HD: 6" All-Mountain

    This is a bike I've been interested in since I heard about it at the 2009 Dirt Demo. I got to throw a leg over one at the Over-the-Edge shop in Hurricane last spring and give it a spin around the lot and was super impressed by its light, responsive feel. I was dying to get it out on some rough, chaussey, Bootleg chop to see how it handled chunk in the real world.

    As we climbed and sprinted the flatter sections, I was again impressed with its responsiveness. This thing is a freak. It is almost hardtail like on smooth climbs and standing sprints and yet still responds pretty well to trail irregularities and squared rocks as it encounters them.

    The all carbon frame is solid and feels stiff through the rough, chundery, Bootleg rocks. Not super marshmellow plush, but it did not deflect off rocks and bounce around either. More of a solid, controlled plush. This would be close to a perfect Super-D/Endurance DH bike. I think it only weighed around 30 lbs yet did not feel like a long-legged trail bike like so many other light 6 inch bikes I've tried in the past. Though not exactly a Delirium-T it felt like it could quietly handle a fair amount of junk.

    The large frame fit my 5' 11.5" body just about perfectly. The head tube was a bit tall which was comfortable for me because it felt similar to my 5 Spot. The top tube length was also just right.

    I still have some misgivings about the durability of carbon fiber when tossed down in rocky country, but I would seriously consider this bike for a do-all "one" bike.

    The nice Ibis guy get me set up to go. All the techs/mechanics at the booths I went to were friendly, helpful, informative, and seemed happy to help us out this year.
    DSC00865

    DSC00866

    DSC00869

    Plenty of room for decent sized tires.
    DSC00867

    This was one of the few bikes we rode that was set up tubeless. I wish all the bike companies did this. While we didn't have as many pinch flats as 2009, we (I should say Russell) did have three the first day.
    DSC00888


    Rocky Mountain Slayer 70 6" All-Mountain

    The Slayer was one of our favorite AM rigs. Its roomy cockpit and upright seat tube made for comfortable, efficient climbing. It seemed to fit both of us really well. Not sure what the BB height measures but this bike is one of the few that did not suffer any pedal strikes out on the trail, yet it didn't feel too tall or tippy.

    The so-called "Smooth-Link" rear end which has a chainstay-mounted rear pivot 10mm above the rear axle to minimize chain growth, separate brake action from suspension action, and most importantly avoid the FSR patent issues, behaved itself well. It did not wag its tail and tracked well over rough terrain. The linear, rising rate did seem to give the Rocky a plush, bottomless feel.

    I don't think Rocky Mountain gets enough credit for making very good bikes. We liked it. Two thumbs up.

    Back in Black.
    DSC00885

    I thought these clear lock-on grips looked cool, especially with the graphics of the Haven bars showing through and these Formula The One brakes felt really nice too.
    DSC00874

    DSC00883

    DSC00873

    Yeti SB 66: 6" All-Mountain

    This was one of the bikes I was really looking forward to testing.... but in the end was somewhat underwhelmed. It felt very similar to the Mojo HD but not quite as responsive. It felt fairly plush on descents... but not quite as plush as the HD. It pedaled really well on the climbs.... but not quite as well as the HD.

    The "Switch Technology" dual link rear suspension uses an eccentric mechanism which switches the direction of rotation as the bike moves through it's travel. It's supposed to create an initial rearward axle path, transitioning into a linear mid range "sweet spot) and then finally after 100 mm of travel the eccentric mechanism switches to a forward, clock-wise rotating direction providing a smooth linear transition into the last third of the travel. That's from the Yeti site. I'm not sure I felt all that going on. Nothing wrong with the rear suspension action really..... but not exactly magical.

    Sizing may have been part of the problem. I seemed to be right between sizes. It was pretty roomy for a medium with a 24.1 top tube length but felt perhaps a bit small for me, however, I bet the large would've felt a bit too big at 25.1".

    This is a very good bike....but In the end.... I would have been a lot more impressed with it, if there were no Mojo HD. If I were choosing between them, well, you can guess which one I'd pick. They were close enough that a good deal on the Yeti could sway me though.

    It was plenty stiff and fairly quiet.

    I liked the clean, uncluttered lines of the Yeti. One of the best proportioned, best-looking shapes of the show.
    DSC00881

    DSC00879

    DSC00878

    You can see the eccentric mechanism just above the bottom bracket. Kind of like the old GT i-Drive but not concentric with the BB.
    DSC00877

    DSC00876


    Trek Slash: 6" All-Mountain

    I hadn't really been following Trek lately so this one slipped beneath my radar. Luckily someone suggested it to me on one of my "Which bikes should I ride at Interbike" threads.

    The Trek tent was by far the most organized, high-tech, and efficient booths at the show. You filled out a brief questionaire and waiver on a tablet, then the beautiful and friendly sales rep gave you the number of the bike you were going to test and as soon as one of the mechanics at one of the 5 or 6 six work stations was available he asked for your number, got your bike and took the time to set you up. Much improved performance over last time I was there.


    The Slash fills in the gap left when they downsized the Remedy to 150 and added the 7" Scratch. It has the patented ABP rear pivot which is concentric with the axle and is supposed to separate braking and suspension action.

    It also has the dual chamber DRCV proprietary Fox shock which is designed to create coil-like feel from an air shock. The way the tech explained it to me sounded just opposite from how it acted on the trail. He said the initial stroke is firm to prevent pedal-induced bob but then when it moves deeper into its travel the second air chamber opens up allowing a deep, plush linear feel. To me it felt plush in the initial inch or two of travel (even bobbed a little on seated climbing... which I don't mind btw) but then seemed to feel a bit harsh on deeper, faster, choppier hits. It did ramp up nicely at the end of the stoke, though a bit abruptly.

    This is one of the bikes we had set up at the Fox booth after riding it awhile with the Trek booth set-up. The Fox guys worked magic with their set-ups but Russell had the same impression as me for the most part even after Fox set it up for him.

    The Slash had a rangy, comfortable cockpit which we both liked. The lower slung, slacker geometry made it feel quite racy on the downs, though I did experience a few pedal strikes.

    Overall, we thought it was a nice, well-designed AM bike. The lime and black colors were rockin' but the overall color/decal scheme was a bit busy for my taste but not bad looking at all.

    DSC00889

    Here's a closer view of the DRCV shock and rocker link.
    DSC00892

    Fairly stiff rear yoke though I sensed a little squirreliness on the chunkier sections. Room for some pretty good meats.
    DSC00891

    DSC00890

    This Truvativ dual ring chain guide was one of the slickest we saw. It had two derailleur pulleys for rollers and the chain shifted seamlessly from one to the other as you shifted. It looks light and seems to manage the chain well.
    DSC00909

    DSC00908

    Fox forks were on most of the 6" AM bikes we rode. I gotta say, for all the raves they've been getting, I was not impressed. Maybe I'm just spoiled my my Marz coil. They were stiff and resisted bottoming nicely. The midstroke was OK but the initial stroke was a bit stiff for my tastes.
    DSC00894

    This bike had the new Reverb Stealth seat post which routes the remote hose out the bottom of the seat post into the seat tube then out at the bottom of the seat tube. Pretty slick, though I'm not sure how you access it when it needs serviced.
    DSC00896

    Most bikes were also set up with top-of-the line XO and XTR components which worked flawlessly. We also saw more internal cable routing like this on the Slash top tube.

    DSC00893


    Cove G-Spot: 6" All-Mountain

    Russell and I both felt like this was our favorite bike of the show. There's always one bike that surprises us, and this year, this was it.

    The G-Spot was plush on the downs, cornered fast and low without striking the pedals, and accelerated on climbs like it was shot out of a shoulder mounted rocket launcher. The frame was stiff and totally free of flex. It wasn't as light as some of th blingier carbon options but the added bulk worked well on this bike.

    Seated pedaling and standing sprints were bob free and efficient. This is one of the bikes that I had the Fox booth set up for me and maybe that was part of the magic because the rear suspension design looks pretty straightforward and simple. Whatever it is.... it seems to work. Proof that you don't necessarily need all the fancy smancy dual chamber, mini-link, eccentric action doo-hickies to get a good ride.

    The build quality is top-notch and burly. It feels like it would take a bunch of abuse and last a long time. We liked it. We liked it a lot.

    More black.
    DSC00897

    DSC00898

    DSC00900

    These Straitline AMP pedals were thin and grippy.
    DSC00903

    Here's a better look at the linkage. It does look a bit like a maestro-copy.
    DSC00904

    DSC00905
    Last edited by KRob; 09-21-2011 at 09:56 AM.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,227

    Day Two Interbike Dirt Demo

    Day one ended with a final romp down Skyline and East leg with two fun, well set-up bikes and some golden light and rainbows in the background.

    DSC00906

    DSC00911

    DSC00912

    DSC00915

    DSC00914

    We found Randy at the Shimano tent with a free beer in hand basking in a warm glow.
    Twas a good day indeed.
    DSC00919

    First up for day two:

    Intense Tracer 29: Trail/AM 29er

    It started raining just as we got out of our trucks and started walking over to the demo area Tuesday morning but it was warm and we knew the trails would be fine.... in fact, we knew they would be perfect.

    Most folks were huddled under pop-ups but we grabbed a couple of bikes and rode through a deserted walkway up to the trails, climbing Girl Scout for our first ride of the day.

    I got this Tracer 29er at the SRAM tent so it had the excellent Monarch RC3 shock and I was hoping for the new Revelation 140 29er fork but all they had was the 120mm (I assume) Reba which worked fine but was a bit overwhelmed by some of the chunkier stuff.

    Climbing on jagged, squared rocky sections was a dream on the Tracer 29er. It rolled over holes and ledges that seemed to stop and hang up lesser wheeled bikes. In fact it was the only bike I cleaned the 4 foot step up at the entrance to Caldera with, though I attempted it with several. I really liked the way it climbed techy stuff. The riding position was spacious and fairly upright.

    Once pointed down it also showed well. The rear end had some wiggle to it but not bad considering the big wheels and mini-links. We didn't get to test it on any of the gnarlier downhills but it railed down West Leg and over the saddle to Mother, gobbling up the step ups, ledges, and switch backs with a confident ease that few of the 26ers could muster. There was some chain slap but nowhere near as annoying as the Diamonback.

    It was raining when I pulled out the camera so only took a couple of quick pics.
    DSC00920

    Does this fork look like it has more than 120mm of travel? It felt pretty good. Fair small bump compliance, nice controlled midstroke action, and it resisted bottoming.
    DSC00922


    Santa Cruz Nomad Carbon: 6" All Mountain

    While I was shredding the Tracer on the rain soaked "hero" dirt, Russell was testing the Nomad. I'm surprised they let him take a carbon bike after what he did to their Blur LTc two years ago, but there he was sporting the Nomad C when we met back up.

    As with most SC bikes the cock pit on this large felt cramped and short which was fine (and fun) when standing, railing, and generally tossing the bike around, but felt small when seated and climbing. I was amazed at how light this bike was for what it is. Maybe that colored my perception of its capabilities but it just seemed to be a bit more sketched out on the same descents and techy rollers that the Tracer 29er just ate up.

    It was definitely tight, laterally stiff, and quiet but it just felt like a smaller, 140mm travel bike in a lot of ways. In fact the Lyric fork on here almost looked and felt like it was lowered to 140 and I don't think it was a U-Turn model. Maybe we weren't getting full travel for some reason but it certainly did not feel like a full 170mm.

    With proper set up and some suspension sorting (and if the sizing were better for our 6' bodies) this bike could've given the HD a run for the light, super D bike of the show.

    DSC00921

    We both loved these Point1 flat pedals on the Nomad
    DSC00923


    Canfield Brothers The One: Not sure how to classify this bike. It can be set up in several different configurations.


    As we were rolling back past the Fox booth up near the end of the trails I noticed the Canfield van had pulled in and was unloading some bikes. I stopped and asked if they were demoing bikes and he said that they were. I asked if he had The One and he said he had his personal bike but he'd be happy to let me take it out. I left the Tracer there in their protective custody (sorry SRAM) and hopped on The One.

    This bike was set up in more of a DH/Slopestyle mode with 8 inch double crown 888 Ti Evo fork, CCDB shock and low slack angles. I assume the rear end was set up to match the front. It felt incredible plush and smooth at both ends just riding around the pits.

    With a 2.75" shock you can get either 7" or 8" of rear wheel travel and with a 2.5" shock you get either 6.5" or 7.5".

    Here's a vid that gives a pretty good explanation of what it is:


    We rode over to our trucks and put on our DH gear and headed for the shuttle. At the top we headed for the front-side DH trails, but before making the climb up to the top I pedaled around a rocky ridgeline trail near the shuttle drop off and discovered the plushness and low bottom bracket height combined for some ridiculous pedal strike. I caught my pedals so many times on this little ride I almost killed myself and finally walked it back over to where Russell was finishing setting up his Commencal Supreme 8.

    This set up was probably perfect for smoother jump-line trails like A-line and Live Wire but for pedaling through the rocks of Bootleg it was a bit scary (for me).

    Once we started down the DH trails though... where little pedaling was required it shined. While not quite as competent a DHer as the Jedi we rode two years ago, it was amazing that a bike that could be set up for 6.5" AM pedaling could transform into something this different. It handled all the steep chutes and drops of Snake Back without a wimper and floated the fun rollers near the bottom with nice balance. It was low and slack and fast in the corners and was a hoot to toss around.

    I wished I could've tested it in more of an AM set up too for comparison, but this bike certainly got my attention. Its versatility is truly amazing.

    Beautiful looking frame.
    DSC00925

    DSC00924

    This linkage not only looked super gorgeous and stiff, but rode like it too.
    DSC00926

    The One had a roadie cassette and derailleur and was set up for the downs.
    DSC00927


    This 888 Ti evo made everything else I rode feel like a buck board. Pure. Deep. Melted. Butta!
    DSC00928

    This Canfield Bros. labeled tire looked like a bigger volume High Roller clone and hooked really well. Of course with the perfect dirt of day two... everything did. Speaking of the new High Roller II we rode some bikes with it really like what we found. I think it will be the next front tire for my Knolly.
    DSC00933

    A little "BC" posing....
    DSC00937'

    And The One in action.
    DSC00936


    Commecal Supreme 8: 8" DH/FR

    Commencal is one of those companies that I've heard about but was never too familiar with. We met one of the US Distributors who also runs the new OTE Sports Shop in Sedona at the I-bike booth. Super nice guys and really interested in getting their bikes better known and more widely distributed in the States.

    This is the bike Russell picked up to complement the One on our DH runs and unfortunately I didn't get to ride it much. Russell said it was super solid and plush but also suffered from ridiculous pedal strikes with its low BB height. Some of this may have been caused due to the bike being too softly spring for Russell though.

    The build quality looked to be really good. The bike felt and looked well-made and substantial.

    DSC00932

    DSC00930

    DSC00931

    More day two reports to come.
    Last edited by KRob; 09-21-2011 at 10:19 AM.

  3. #3
    "Its All Good"
    Reputation: Whafe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    10,716
    Great stuff as always, thanks for taking the time and sharing
    The_Lecht_Rocks: whafe - cheeers - may i offer an official apology for the wagon wheeler "dis-belief"

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    666
    Awesome Rob. A lot of time and effort goes into your IB threads! Always a pleasure to read.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,883
    Where's a pic of that beautiful Trek sales rep?
    A blind man searches in a dark room for a black hat that isn't there. Dashiell Hammett

  6. #6
    it's the ride....
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    517
    Whoaa..., as always.. great write up.
    Really appreciate the time spent for demoing and spread it over.
    Ulating blencong sejatine tataraning lelaku...

  7. #7
    Delirious Tuck
    Reputation: thefriar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,329
    Great stuff! How did the Mojo HD feel vs the 5-spots DW? Did you notice differences in the tunes?

  8. #8
    BC
    BC is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    832
    Good stuff. Thanks !

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    7,927
    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    Cove G-Spot: 6" All-Mountain
    Whatever it is.... it seems to work. Proof that you don't necessarily need all the fancy smancy dual chamber, mini-link, eccentric action doo-hickies to get a good ride.
    Here's a better look at the linkage. It does a bit look like a maestro-copy.
    DSC00904

    DSC00905


    First, thanks again for your annual review. Great perspective and good writing. I know it must have taken a lot of time to gather your thoughts and organize them with pics for our gratification.


    Yep, it is a mini-link, right?!

    I am really glad to hear your take on the G-Spot, as that is one bike that I really looked at when shopping for the Delirium. The G-Spot looked great on paper, but I couldn't find anything for longer-term reviews or even a review that discussed the pedaling characteristics. I don't regret the direction I went (I love the Delirium) but I think that the G-Spot could have been just as happy in my stable. When it came down to brass tacks, for the price, I wanted more of a dual-duty bike than I thought the G-Spot was. On paper, the angles/geo were very close to my last bike (V. Terremoto), and I wanted to try a bigger bike!
    Last edited by CharacterZero; 09-20-2011 at 08:01 AM.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    902
    Thanks for the G-Spot review man, that bike has been on the forefront of my radar for a long time. Cove builds solid bikes and it's great to know they have a winner with that trail bike.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BatoMTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    36
    Thanks for reviews, looking forward to day two !

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    152
    Thanks! Looking forward to Day 2 as well.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DJ Giggity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,217
    Great write up again KRob. You rode many of the bikes I was hoping to hear about. Thanks for sharing and I am looking forward to part two.
    Only two infinite things exist: the universe and stupidity. And, I am unsure of the universe
    - Albert Einstein

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,227
    Quote Originally Posted by thefriar View Post
    Great stuff! How did the Mojo HD feel vs the 5-spots DW? Did you notice differences in the tunes?
    I think the front half of the bikes felt very similar with similar cockpit set-ups, top tube lengths, HA and 160 forks. The action of the dw-link felt fairly similar between the 5 Spot and HD but I think the HD did feel a bit deeper and resisted bottoming better than my Spot. The Spot is a bit more compliant over small stuff but the HD felt lighter (which I think it was) and seems to accelerate a bit better on standing sprints.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,227
    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy View Post
    Where's a pic of that beautiful Trek sales rep?
    You'll have to ask Randy. He was always hanging around the free beer and hottie tents. I think he rode four bikes in the two days. LOL.

  16. #16
    parts leftover
    Reputation: schlim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    995
    Excellent Interbike dirt demo coverage. Well-written and carefully thought out comments. I haven't seen reviews of this quality anywhere else on the internet this year. Wish I could have been there this year, although it sounds like many manufacturers chose to attend Outerbike instead. Cheers!

  17. #17
    parts leftover
    Reputation: schlim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    995
    KRob, I see lots of flat pedals in the pics. Do you prefer them to clipless for the AM types of bikes you were riding? What do you use on your 5 Spot?

  18. #18
    it's the ride....
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    517
    KRob, how are the different wheels impacting the rides? Or was it too short ride to discern any performance difference?
    Ulating blencong sejatine tataraning lelaku...

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    902
    Hey KRob, did you happen to see a Devinci Dixon or do you know if they were demoing them for the Dirt Demos?

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,227
    Quote Originally Posted by softailteamrider View Post
    KRob, how are the different wheels impacting the rides? Or was it too short ride to discern any performance difference?
    I'm not super sensitive to wheel stiffness but we didn't ride any wheels that noticeably adversely affected the ride. Most the bikes were equipped with high-end stuff though so I wouldn't expect that.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,227
    Quote Originally Posted by schlim View Post
    KRob, I see lots of flat pedals in the pics. Do you prefer them to clipless for the AM types of bikes you were riding? What do you use on your 5 Spot?
    I don't prefer flats but Russell and Randy do, so they ran flats and I just had to deal with it when we switched bikes. Some worked better with my clipless shoes than others but none were a huge issue because they have rubber soles. I run the new CB Candy 2 pedals on my 5 spot but had an old pair of Acids that I brought along for the demos... in case I misplaced them.

    I'm sorry you weren't able to make it this year. I always enjoy your insigtful and well-written reports.
    Last edited by KRob; 09-24-2011 at 01:34 PM.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,227
    Quote Originally Posted by Magsrgod View Post
    Hey KRob, did you happen to see a Devinci Dixon or do you know if they were demoing them for the Dirt Demos?
    There was a DeVinci booth and I saw some of their bikes up on the trails and in the shuttle truck but we never did get around to check them out.

    They looked the biz for sure.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    902
    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    There was a DeVinci booth and I saw some of their bikes up on the trails and in the shuttle truck but we never did get around to check them out.

    They looked the biz for sure.
    Dang, I've always liked the ride of Treks and these looks super promising. The Geometry on the Dixon seems pretty spot on for what I'm looking for!

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,227
    Commencal Meta AM 5" trail/am

    This was a cool bike. Definitely designed to rule the European type Enduros like Mega Avalanche and longer Super Ds..... yet still pedaled well and had a comfortable middle-of-the-bike seated postion for climbing.

    It had 150mm of travel and a slackish 67 deg HA and fairly low BB so was a lot of fun to rail through the turns and pop off all the little booters and jumps. It handled the BC brick and brack with astounding composure despite it's diminutive travel. Like a DH-Trail bike.

    The suspension isolated pedaling and braking forces nicely. The linkage looked complicated but did its job well. Pink bike has a nice synopsis of how the suspension works here.

    Construction was sturdy, stiff, and not-too-light. I suspect this bike weighed closer to 35 lbs than 30 but I could be wrong. It sure felt like it would stand up to some abuse.

    It also features 12x142 rear wheel spacing, press fit BB, internal cable routing with cool gromets at the holes (some of them anyway), and comes with a Cane Creek standard semi-integrated tapered head tube that is compatible with the Cane Creek Angleset. Nice.

    I haven't ridden the Banshee Spitfire but I imagine this felt similar based on the geometry and DH bias.

    I liked it a lot. It was fast, felt solid, and the price is in Banshee territory also ($1695).

    DSC00941

    DSC00945

    Close up of the linkage
    DSC00942

    DSC00946

    Not sure what tires these were (Schwalbe something-or-other). By this point in the day I wasn't looking at tires. With the trails all tacky and perfect from the rain, everything hooked up great.
    DSC00943

    Here's a shot of that grommet which was pretty slick.....the electrical tape on the other one....not so much.
    DSC00944


    BMC Trail Fox: 150mm Trail

    Swiss bike maker BMC touts this as a Swiss Army knife of bikes but we found it lacking. It was certainly light (probably less than 26lbs) and climbed really well on smooth trails, but the geometry felt too steep and the BB too tall. More long legged trail bike than all-mountain ripper. In fact it felt more like a XC race bike to me after stepping off the Meta AM.

    Russell did not care for its descending manners (or lack thereof) at all. I think his exact words were, "I wanted to toss it off the trail". He also commented that it "felt tinny".

    It was beautifully built and the color scheme and components came together nicely to make for a very sharp looking bike. It was all carbon, including the wheels and price tag would be somewhere north of $8K I'd bet. But looks aren't everything.

    It might be a good endurance racer if the trails don't get too rough or technical. Think Leadville not Megavalanche (or even PC P2P for that matter).

    DSC00947

    DSC00949

    DSC00948

    A couple of bikes had these Onza Canis tires and we thought they worked really well.
    DSC00951

    DSC00950


    More bikes to come. Stay tuned.
    Last edited by KRob; 09-21-2011 at 05:36 PM.

  25. #25
    T , V , & K Rider
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,339
    Great stuff.....much appreciated ! TIG.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. RFX @ interbike dirt demo?
    By TIMBERRR in forum Turner
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 09-18-2010, 04:05 AM
  2. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 02-02-2010, 12:11 AM
  3. Interbike Dirt Demo fun...
    By beagledadi in forum Nevada
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 09-28-2008, 08:25 AM
  4. A peek from the Interbike dirt demo:
    By tscheezy in forum Knolly
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-13-2007, 03:20 AM
  5. Interbike dirt demo 2005
    By roy harley in forum Yeti
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-28-2005, 10:18 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •