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  1. #1
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    Is the T275 too much of a downhill bike for me?

    Currently in the process of making up my mind about a new bike during the coming months, and at the moment I am looking a lot at the T275 and the Turner Burner.

    Noticed some remarks about the climbing abilities of the T275, and I am wondering if this bike will be too much of a downhill bomber for me, or if I can expect to be happy with it as a general purpose trail bike, with a good mix of up and downs throughout the ride without having to fiddle too much with suspension settings (like the thought of keeping the rear suspension in one setting most of the time if using stuff like Fox' CTD-setups).

    When considering the Burner vs the 275, I really like Intense's kit, with the Pike instead of Fox, as well as better options for routing cables to a RS Reverb Stealth dropper post.

    Would love to get some insight from people with riding experience on the T275 (or even better people who have tried both bikes, or other good options).

  2. #2
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    I have had a T275 for about two weeks now. I think the bike is a great all-around bike if built up to meet your needs. It climbs well, REALLY well in the short travel position. I have a RS Pike at 160mm travel and have switched between long and short travel modes with the same 160mm fork. The frame is designed to be setup at either 150mm fork/Rear in short travel mode or 160mm fork with rear in long travel mode. However, I think the T275 climbs well in either mode with a 160mm fork but definitely better in short travel mode. I think the reviews or comments that you may have read are about the T275 in the long travel position when climbing.

    And yes, it does amazing on the DH. But don't think that that means that it doesn't climb well.

    Hope this helps. you may also want to consider the Carbine as well.

  3. #3
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    Glad to hear you are happy with your bike.

    What kind of shock do you run in the back? If I am going with the pro kit, it seems the Monarch or an upgrade to the DBAir are the options, just wondering if the upgrade is worth the money, or if I should rather save them for a fatbike for the winter

  4. #4
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    I haven't tried the DB Air but I do like the RS Monarch much better than the Fox RP3 CTD that was on the Carbine. RS Monarch is more adjustable and seems to be more active with the compression wide open. I think if you were planning to DH more or do a lot of hard enduro courses, then maybe consider the DB Air but otherwise I think you would be happy with the RS Monarch.

  5. #5
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    So,, in 150 pike/short travel mode...

    This is the best climbing / all around mode?

    I'm in the east and this is the mode I suspect will work best for most times.

    Does the head angle/trail adjust to the point where you can feel it turn easier/quicker?

    I know your answer above to which shock but I want to spin it. I read in a review of the new nomad that on that bike review thought the RS had a better pedaling platform and the CCDB was the better bomber. I wonder if that carries over here.

    Kinda sideways question that I will ask in another thread. SC updated the VVP with the Bronson/Solo. Do you know if this Intense had the license for that update? Not the new Nomad, it's obviously not that.

  6. #6
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    The Nomad review was the Monarch Plus vs the Vivid, not the CCDBA. The Vivid is a pure DH shock where the Cane Creek offers a TON of adjustability. My recommendation would be to go with the Monarch unless you are very comfortable doing suspension tuning. You are going to get 90% of the performance with the Monarch is a much simpler package.

    As far as the bike being too much I think that is more of question of what you like to do. With the understanding it is a 160 bike and not a WC XC race Whippet you will enjoy it immensely. I do 2500' climbing days several times per week on my 160 bike without issue, but I am also not trying to get top 10 Strava times on the climbs. I can get into the top 20 on most climbs if I push myself though, which speaks to how versatile these bikes are.

  7. #7
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    I have been hearing great things about the cane creek/pike setup. I have read multiple reviews saying that the cane creek really makes the bike come alive, not only on the t275 but other bikes with the same suspension combo. I will be running the cc db air cs and pike on my build. Plus with all the tune ability how can you go wrong you can dial in your rig perfectly.

  8. #8
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    You're in a more upright, leaned back climbing position (unless you get a 2 step pike) but it's a light bike. As long as you're reasonably fit, it climbs fine. You won't win any climbing races, but I think it's worth it at the top. I just leave it in 160/160. I have the ccdba-cs.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ridnw/bear View Post
    I have had a T275 for about two weeks now. I think the bike is a great all-around bike if built up to meet your needs. It climbs well, REALLY well in the short travel position. I have a RS Pike at 160mm travel and have switched between long and short travel modes with the same 160mm fork. The frame is designed to be setup at either 150mm fork/Rear in short travel mode or 160mm fork with rear in long travel mode. However, I think the T275 climbs well in either mode with a 160mm fork but definitely better in short travel mode. I think the reviews or comments that you may have read are about the T275 in the long travel position when climbing.

    And yes, it does amazing on the DH. But don't think that that means that it doesn't climb well.

    Hope this helps. you may also want to consider the Carbine as well.
    I've been riding a Tracer VP 26" for a few years and I have futzed with every combination of shock pressure and travel mode and I can tell you this about how the bike differs going up vs down.

    1) it climbs well in either setting with a bit of propedal in the RP23, but is far snappier in the short-travel mode. I fully believe that this due to two reasons: a) the STA in short travel mode is about 1 degree steeper and b) the shock rate/leverage is different in short-travel.

    2) it's a friggin beast going DH in either setting, but is light years more fun in long-travel mode DH due to the slackening of the HTA (STA slackens as well), but it requires more PSI due to the shock rate/leverage change. It is so much better DH in LT mode that I have tended to just leave it there and deal with the uphill compromises. Climbing in LT mode with "MORE" propedal helps this and I've just learned to shift my body around to ensure that the front end stays planted. I am undoubtedly faster DH in LT mode.

    3) nearly every ride I do involved climbing 1000-1500vf in 3-6 miles right out of the car. These climbs range from tight and technical to smooth and flowing, but ALWAYS a climb!

    4) Flat-ish (on average) single track, flowing or tech is a toss up between LT and ST modes.

    5) Where I am today is I am strongly considering leaving the bike in ST mode for the steeper STA and getting an Angleset to decrease the HTA by a degree or so.. This way, I will get the best of both worlds.

    It's a very versatile bike with lots of good points and it's a very flexible platform that you can run any fork from a 140mm/32mm to a 160mm/36mm, 2.1" to 2.5" tires, wide or narrow rims, etc.....

    I run mine with a 15QR 150mm travel Fox 32 Talas (NEVER use the TALAS!!!!) and med-width rims with 2.4" tires (tubeless). I also just got a dropper post that makes the bike even more flexible.... Rear shock is a Fox RP23 High Volume air can that I custom shimmed to be more like medium volume. The bike (for me would work better with a standard/low volume air can IMHO.

    The only thing the bike doesn't master is very steep up hill climbs with a lot of features that can grab and trap the rear wheel. It seems that there's a angle, a threshold so to speak, where the riders center off gravity impacts the suspension on super steep climbs such that it bogs down a bit. This point is highly dependent on shock set up and rider weight, but it is a deficiency.

    If I had it to do over again, I might get another VPP bike or a DW link bike like an IBIS or Turner or Pivot due to the fact that these bikes don't suffer the super-steep technical rear wheel bogging that VPP sometimes does.

  10. #10
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    if you're asking the question then yes.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by perbl View Post
    Glad to hear you are happy with your bike.

    What kind of shock do you run in the back? If I am going with the pro kit, it seems the Monarch or an upgrade to the DBAir are the options, just wondering if the upgrade is worth the money, or if I should rather save them for a fatbike for the winter
    DBInline - The Disruptor

    I'd recommend the Cane Creek Inline. Got a chance to ride it on the 275 and can say it's the best shock I've had experience with. You'll see some media reviews and write ups this week.

  12. #12
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    I actually ended up with a Santa Cruz Nomad, really liked the reviews so far with regards to climbing capabilities vs downhill proficiency.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by perbl View Post
    I am wondering if this bike will be too much of a downhill bomber.
    ok...

    Quote Originally Posted by perbl View Post
    I actually ended up with a Santa Cruz Nomad
    ...so you get a bike that's got even more slack?

  14. #14
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    Yeah, but they got Aqua and Pink

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaymonster View Post
    ok...



    ...so you get a bike that's got even more slack?
    Indeed. I did not consider it at first, but when I started reading the reviews, as well as talking to local guys who compared the Bronson to the Nomad, I became convinced that it might be worth trying out as the one bike that can do it all, from general trail use, to playing around on the downhill slopes. Several people with exerience with both seems to favor the Nomad for certain climbing aspects compared to the Bronson, which seems a bit too good to be true by just looking at how slack the bike is.

    It will be interesting to see if it will suit me, or if I will need a kinder type of bike to take care of the climbing

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