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Thread: Hard Eddy

  1. #1
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    Hard Eddy

    Anyone know when the Hard Eddy will hit dealers?

    I've been focused on the El Mariachi Ti vs. Highball debate but this bike intrigues me.

    Totally unrelated point and not to sidebar my question but......

    It'd be interesting to know if the Highball, Hard Eddy, and other carbon frames (Titus, Spezy, etc.) are made in the same plant.

    Would it be too much for bike owners to know the supply/manufacturing side of carbon frames? We know who makes the aluminum, ti, and steel tubes (ie:Easton, Reynolds, and Tange), so why not carbon?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by 45ronin View Post
    It'd be interesting to know if the Highball, Hard Eddy, and other carbon frames (Titus, Spezy, etc.) are made in the same plant.

    Would it be too much for bike owners to know the supply/manufacturing side of carbon frames?
    IMO, they don't want you making those kind of "value" decisions and won't ever voluntarily offer the info.
    whatever...

  3. #3
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    Worthy rant

    I agree with you, however we as cyclists have allowed the cycling industry to shovel, "Made in Taiwan", to us willy nilly. There has to be a huge difference where the carbon layups for Look (lower tier frames), Felt, Santa Cruz, Ibis, Breezer, Intense, etc. (list goes on and on) are made.

    Would we buy a car not knowing the actual builder? Here's the new Ford Mustang. It was designed in Dearborn, but "Made in Asia." Good luck with that.

    At an easy $5g for a quality carbon bike these days, the manufacturing of our tubes, lugs, and frames should be transparent. Shucks, some of us would even want to know the technology behind the resins and branding with that....

    If transparency were to happen, we'd see an obvious decrease in bike prices. All the pumped up marketing about layups, molds, etc. would be lost on the consumer as we'd know that the same engineers and factory workers made two competing brands.

    In the end, it would get more people on bikes, and good ones at that.

    I'm new to CF bikes and want to jump in. My short time researching frames has led me to press the "chill" button till more information is put out by the industry and companies I want to keep floating in the black.

  4. #4
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    Edgerat keeping it real.

    With that said, sign me up Jeff for one of your large Hard Eddy frames fresh off the boat in Long Beach from Taiwan.
    Last edited by 45ronin; 11-25-2011 at 09:12 PM.

  5. #5
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    Why the F does it matter where it was made in Asia? With the exception of a few boutique frames that are made here, EVERYTHING is made overseas, where they have mastered the carbon frame manufacture in higher numbers. If you HAVE to know where it was made, buy an american made bike. As a consumer you are NOT entitled to full disclosure on every aspect of your purchase, if you don't like it, don't buy it. What it comes down to, for me at least, is the attitude of the name that is on the frame, are they going to stand behind the frame with a warranty or, not? That is all I would be worried about.
    Isaac

  6. #6
    Dude, got any schwag?
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    Listen, I work in the aerospace industry designing & building carbon fiber airplanes, right here in the USA. I'll tell you this, by and large, raw materials for carbon fiber construction are made for certified aerospace applications. Much like the early days of Ti frames, the materials we use for bikes are from the same batches as what goes on rockets, military aircraft and the like. Many of the engineers (like Seed) have come over from military/aerospace backgrounds, so the quality and expertice in design is literally "rocket science". These Intense frames are so technically advanced, transparency would fly way over the heads of even the above average consumer. Finally, I know from reliable sources that Intense has done extensive QA and destructive testing both here and in Germany to prove the design and manufacturing processes of their frames. Buy one and go fast!

    PS, I do not, nor have I ever worked for Intense.
    Billy

    Speed is sweet, it's like an avenue to
    ... Shredtopia!

  7. #7
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    I just bought a Big Top or I would be all over this. Hopefully it has shorter chainstays and slacker head angle like the Yeti. The Yeti handles amazingly well. It absolutely rips!

    Intense can still get my money if they have a carbon trail/AM 29er in the works. Was planning on getting a carbon SB-95 when available next year to complement my Uzzi and Big Top but always have had a soft spot for intense.

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