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  1. #1
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    5.5 Ride report - Nirvana?

    After finally committing to buying another bike, I went for an Intense 5.5.

    Let me start with a preface. I'm 35, and I grew up racing BMX. I've been riding mountain bikes since 1994, starting with a GT RTS (E-Man and I started at the same time, on the same ride on the Fullerton Loop). Over the years, I've had quite a few bikes. Usually the bike change is a result of a change of interest in riding (more DH/technical or XC, depending on the group I ride with). Before the 5.5, my stable included a GT 24" BMX bike, GT ZR-1000, an Azonic Evolution, GT DHi, Surly 1x1, and an Intense UZZI SLX. All of these bikes I really enjoy for their particular niche. The one area that I've missed lately was a relatively lightweight trail bike. The last trail bike I had was a GT XCR LE (i-Drive).

    The goal in the new bike was to morphe as many of the benefits of the above bikes into one. My goals included:
    1) I want to pedal while standing. As a former BMXer (okay, part timer these days), I do a lot of standing sprints. Also, after riding the Surly singlespeed for the past 6 months, I really have learned to enjoy climbing (I never liked uphills). I needed a bike that I could climb and sprint while standing.

    2) I needed a bike with "snap." I wanted a bike that could quickly snap or pop out of turns or over rocks/obstacles. This, to me, is an important aspect of riding. I like to come out of a turn, pulling up on the front wheel while cranking the pedals - much like how you see many BMXers. It's definately a more aggressive riding style. This style became more pronounced with the singlespeed, since I couldn't rely on gears.

    3) It had to be stable. As I mentioned, I enjoy technical stuff, especially rocks. Obviously, my DHi (downhill bike) is quite capable in the rocks and at high speeds. The UZZI also does a fine job in this stuff. The Surly, with it's quick steering is alright, but in a different way. While it's precise steering helps at low speed, the steepish head angle (and that it's a hardtail) makes the bike somewhat of a handful at speed on ruts and rocks.

    4) It had to be able to climb well. Okay, this one is tough to explain. The UZZI has full gears and can climb about anything reasonably well, just not very fast, and it takes a lot of work to pull the weight. The Surly brought me to new levels of fitness and climbing abilities. Since I learned to climb standing (you don't have a choice with a 32:18 gear), I've come to really enjoy being able to stand without any suspension movement. One push on the pedal quickly turns into forward momentum, unlike the UZZI, which sucks some of it up. Unfortunately, there are times that I need a much easier gear, such as for really loose or rocky terrain. Unfortunately, this is what the singlespeed lacks (easier gears). The UZZI weighs about 36#, while the Surly is about 23-24#.

    5) I need balance. As mentioned in #4, I need something between the UZZI and Surly in terms of weight, gears, and climbing ability. I also need something in between that also works for multiple types of technical riding: a bike that could almost do as much as the UZZI, but without the weight and suspension penalty.

    Keep in mind that I ride for fun. I don't race, nor will I probably ever (okay, I'd like to race DH and mountaincross). Okay, so I'll never race XC.

    I felt with the above requirements, the 5.5 would satisfy my needs. Although I rode E-man's 5.5 around the parking lot, I pretty much went by his suggestion. He rides very different than myself, but he understands my needs and riding style.

    Quite frankly, I was less than impressed with the parking lot ride of his bike. Yes, the shocks weren't set for my weight. This really made it seem bad, but I understood the VPP concept and the importance of having the shock set up properly. I still thought the bike had more flex than I wanted (comparted to my singlespeed). I went ahead with it anyway, know that a parking lot ride was not a good representative of how it will perform on the trail. As anyone who has been around mountain bikes, purchasing a bike is kind of a leap of faith. And I had faith in Intense.

    The parts build for the bike mostly included Shimano XT stuff, including the '04 cranks (love them so far). I did opt for the '03 shifters, as I have no intention of converting to the Retard Rise rear derailleur. The fork is a Manitou Minute 2 w/130mm travel. The wheels, which will be built soon are King ISO hubs (red) and XM819 Disc rims. Most of the parts and the wheels are from The Path, located in Tustin, Calif (great service and incredible technical knowledge). The brakes will be Hayes Mag Plus discs.

    For it's maiden voyage, I had to borrow parts from other bikes and use a set of Mavic Crossmax wheels I've had sitting around from a few years ago when I was last on my lightweight bike kick (they flex too much for my 195# stature). FYI, at 5'11", I chose the medium 5.5. My Surly and UZZI are both mediums.

    I had no problems whatsoever with the build. I started at 8:00pm on Saturday night, and finished by midnight. I wasn't in a rush, but I wanted to ride it the following day at San Juan (Orange County, Calif). This would be a perfect ride for the new steed.

    I set up the shock and fork with a rough guess on air pressures. The shock (Swinger 4-Way) and fork manuals offered some help, but just enough to teach me the concept of the products (I already understook SPV, having the Progressive 5th on the UZZI). This was helpful since I've never owned a Manitou shock/fork. Unfortunately, they didn't explain how to put in the heavier spring in the fork (it's an air fork, but with a spring assist). The settings proved to work out well, but as the bike loosened up, I know that I'll need to play with it a little bit. Nonetheless, I've found a great starting point that worked really well and gave me a positive experience with the bike.

    How did it work?
    On the goals:
    1) As mentioned, I like to stand while climbing. The 5.5 is the best standing-while-pedaling full suspension bike that I have ever ridden. There was virtually no feedback (jacking or squatting). I tried this in virtually all gear combinations (many single-pivot bikes will vary with the front chainring - jack in granny and squat in the big ring). I really felt like I was riding the singlespeed. While pulling taller gears, I did notice a bit of flex, but that was mainly when it was in the middle gear up front and a smaller gear in the back. I'd hear the chain against the big ring under hard torque. Ultimately, I was quite impressed with the climbing prowess of the 5.5. No exaggeration - you have to ride it to truly believe it.

    2) The 5.5 has snap. It snaps out of turns well and pops over stuff with ease. With the 90mm stem and Pro-Taper bars, the positioning to work the front end and pull it around it feels just right. It responds very well to rider input from working the bike to the quick-pedal snaps exiting turns.

    3) This area is a compromise. I knew that going into it. It's impossible to have the stability of a slacked out DH bike with the turning prowess of a quick-steering XC bike. Those are physics. Nonetheless, the 5.5 fits nicely between the two extremes.

    4) Well, it has gears and weighs probably about 27#. So, that was an easy goal to accomplish. It has gears, suspension, and climbs like a hardtail without having to deal with lock-out levers (which I always forget when I get to the top of the climb!). Again, it worked for #1, so that also helps in this catagory.

    5) This was somewhat of a given with this build. The 5.5 is the best combination of traits that I like that I think I could have come up with. I don't think any other frame could compare.

    On note that I'd like to add, if you do get an Intense, check the tightness of the hardware. On my 5.5, the lower shock bolt was close to finger tight. My frame is also a newer one that allows me to simply install pre-bled brake lines and zip-tie them to the frame (some earlier models, you had to thread the line through small holes then assemble and bleed the brakes). This is a plus. I do wish Intense include a chainstay protector (I wish all frame companies did). My biggest concern is the long-term durability of the bearings. I know people have had problems with bearings seizing on their Tracers and UZZIs. I also know that they loosen up over time (on all frames with bearings), so we'll see how that is after time. Bearings with adjustable preload? That'd be nice!

    Well, I have to get back to work. I will gladly answer any questions, and will post more when I get more time.
    Last edited by Blaster1200; 03-01-2004 at 04:39 PM.

  2. #2
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    Photo of me and the 5.5 at San Juan.
    Again, note that the wheels, brakes, and seat will change in the next week or so.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
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    Oh yeah, I went with the optional sparkle silver, like my UZZI seen in another thread.

  4. #4
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    Stem and Handlebar setup

    Blaster,

    I also just purchased a 5.5 EVP. I'm 5', 11" and weight about 195# also. I've been experimenting with the stem spacers to try and optimize the handlebar height. I want to have the ability to climb steep trails without penalizing the downhill capabilities too much. I have a thompson 90MM 5 degree stem and Easten monkey lite SL riser handlebars. And have a Minute III fork in front. Iím currently using a 1/2"" spacer under my stem, but am going to try no spacers to see how it feels. Yesterday I tried some steep climbs and it climbed really well, and the downhill performance was also excellent. I'm wondering how no spacers are going to feel. E-man sent me a MBA article which recoommended not raising the hadlebars since the head tube was alreadt higher for the longer travel front fork.

    What kind of spacer setup are you using? Being the same height as me, it would be interesting to compare notes.

  5. #5
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    I am also running a Thomson 90mm/5 degree stem.Handlebars are Answer Pro Tapers - 2" rise. It's tough to compare bar height, because Easton 2" bars are much lower, if I remember correctly. I think the 2.5" EA70 bar is the same as the 2" Pro Taper. I think I have the 2" EA70s on my UZZI and DHi.

    Are the Monkey Lites the carbon fiber bars? If so, those are a lot lower (and narrower). At my weight, I wouldn't dare use a carbon handlebar on any bike. E-man has the carbon bars.

    While first building the bike, I initially had 15mm worth of spacers under the stem. When I took the bike out of the rack, I quickly realized that the bars were way too tall. I immediately pulled the fork off and cut it down 10mm, leaving a 5mm spacer below. I left a 5mm spacer above the stem in case I needed to go up. With these bars, I may even remove the lower spacer (I'll first flip it up top for testing).

    I rarely will ever listen to what MBA says, since they rarely ever give you enough information to come to a conclusion. For example, I've seen countless times where they say a bike's springs are too stiff, but they fail to include the test riders' weights! The spring weights on these bikes would probably be perfect for me. Coming from an editorial background, I realize how important it is to include these details. They do have a tough job, considering that they're job is to merely give their opinions (no sarcasm intended, it really is tough). It's also tough to convert your own opinions to satisfy the needs of the masses (i.e., a tester's desires may be different, but he can see the traits that most are looking for). And again, they are just opinions - neither right or wrong. I could go on and on about magazine reviews...

  6. #6
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    punishment/durability

    Hi Blaster,

    I'm from portugal and I have a Tracer and a Spider. I like the ability of the tracer over rough stuff (a great sensation when pedaling over rocks for instance). The tracer seems much more solid than the spider.
    Do you like to pedal rough stuff uphill (technical)? How do you compare the 5.5 to the SLX (remove the weight penalty of the SLX) over rough stuff?
    How much abuse do you think the 5.5 can take?
    For the bearings, I removed all my spider's bearings and put Hi qualty SKF bearings where I put a huge amount og hi quality grease after removing the seals. So far no comparation with the original bad quality bearings.

    sorry my english.
    paulo from portugal
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaster1200
    After finally committing to buying another bike, I went for an Intense 5.5.

    Let me start with a preface. I'm 35, and I grew up racing BMX. I've been riding mountain bikes since 1994, starting with a GT RTS (E-Man and I started at the same time, on the same ride on the Fullerton Loop). Over the years, I've had quite a few bikes. Usually the bike change is a result of a change of interest in riding (more DH/technical or XC, depending on the group I ride with). Before the 5.5, my stable included a GT 24" BMX bike, GT ZR-1000, an Azonic Evolution, GT DHi, Surly 1x1, and an Intense UZZI SLX. All of these bikes I really enjoy for their particular niche. The one area that I've missed lately was a relatively lightweight trail bike. The last trail bike I had was a GT XCR LE (i-Drive).

    The goal in the new bike was to morphe as many of the benefits of the above bikes into one. My goals included:
    1) I want to pedal while standing. As a former BMXer (okay, part timer these days), I do a lot of standing sprints. Also, after riding the Surly singlespeed for the past 6 months, I really have learned to enjoy climbing (I never liked uphills). I needed a bike that I could climb and sprint while standing.

    2) I needed a bike with "snap." I wanted a bike that could quickly snap or pop out of turns or over rocks/obstacles. This, to me, is an important aspect of riding. I like to come out of a turn, pulling up on the front wheel while cranking the pedals - much like how you see many BMXers. It's definately a more aggressive riding style. This style became more pronounced with the singlespeed, since I couldn't rely on gears.

    3) It had to be stable. As I mentioned, I enjoy technical stuff, especially rocks. Obviously, my DHi (downhill bike) is quite capable in the rocks and at high speeds. The UZZI also does a fine job in this stuff. The Surly, with it's quick steering is alright, but in a different way. While it's precise steering helps at low speed, the steepish head angle (and that it's a hardtail) makes the bike somewhat of a handful at speed on ruts and rocks.

    4) It had to be able to climb well. Okay, this one is tough to explain. The UZZI has full gears and can climb about anything reasonably well, just not very fast, and it takes a lot of work to pull the weight. The Surly brought me to new levels of fitness and climbing abilities. Since I learned to climb standing (you don't have a choice with a 32:18 gear), I've come to really enjoy being able to stand without any suspension movement. One push on the pedal quickly turns into forward momentum, unlike the UZZI, which sucks some of it up. Unfortunately, there are times that I need a much easier gear, such as for really loose or rocky terrain. Unfortunately, this is what the singlespeed lacks (easier gears). The UZZI weighs about 36#, while the Surly is about 23-24#.

    5) I need balance. As mentioned in #4, I need something between the UZZI and Surly in terms of weight, gears, and climbing ability. I also need something in between that also works for multiple types of technical riding: a bike that could almost do as much as the UZZI, but without the weight and suspension penalty.

    Keep in mind that I ride for fun. I don't race, nor will I probably ever (okay, I'd like to race DH and mountaincross). Okay, so I'll never race XC.

    I felt with the above requirements, the 5.5 would satisfy my needs. Although I rode E-man's 5.5 around the parking lot, I pretty much went by his suggestion. He rides very different than myself, but he understands my needs and riding style.

    Quite frankly, I was less than impressed with the parking lot ride of his bike. Yes, the shocks weren't set for my weight. This really made it seem bad, but I understood the VPP concept and the importance of having the shock set up properly. I still thought the bike had more flex than I wanted (comparted to my singlespeed). I went ahead with it anyway, know that a parking lot ride was not a good representative of how it will perform on the trail. As anyone who has been around mountain bikes, purchasing a bike is kind of a leap of faith. And I had faith in Intense.

    The parts build for the bike mostly included Shimano XT stuff, including the '04 cranks (love them so far). I did opt for the '03 shifters, as I have no intention of converting to the Retard Rise rear derailleur. The fork is a Manitou Minute 2 w/130mm travel. The wheels, which will be built soon are King ISO hubs (red) and XM819 Disc rims. Most of the parts and the wheels are from The Path, located in Tustin, Calif (great service and incredible technical knowledge). The brakes will be Hayes Mag Plus discs.

    For it's maiden voyage, I had to borrow parts from other bikes and use a set of Mavic Crossmax wheels I've had sitting around from a few years ago when I was last on my lightweight bike kick (they flex too much for my 195# stature). FYI, at 5'11", I chose the medium 5.5. My Surly and UZZI are both mediums.

    I had no problems whatsoever with the build. I started at 8:00pm on Saturday night, and finished by midnight. I wasn't in a rush, but I wanted to ride it the following day at San Juan (Orange County, Calif). This would be a perfect ride for the new steed.

    I set up the shock and fork with a rough guess on air pressures. The shock (Swinger 4-Way) and fork manuals offered some help, but just enough to teach me the concept of the products (I already understook SPV, having the Progressive 5th on the UZZI). This was helpful since I've never owned a Manitou shock/fork. Unfortunately, they didn't explain how to put in the heavier spring in the fork (it's an air fork, but with a spring assist). The settings proved to work out well, but as the bike loosened up, I know that I'll need to play with it a little bit. Nonetheless, I've found a great starting point that worked really well and gave me a positive experience with the bike.

    How did it work?
    On the goals:
    1) As mentioned, I like to stand while climbing. The 5.5 is the best standing-while-pedaling full suspension bike that I have ever ridden. There was virtually no feedback (jacking or squatting). I tried this in virtually all gear combinations (many single-pivot bikes will vary with the front chainring - jack in granny and squat in the big ring). I really felt like I was riding the singlespeed. While pulling taller gears, I did notice a bit of flex, but that was mainly when it was in the middle gear up front and a smaller gear in the back. I'd hear the chain against the big ring under hard torque. Ultimately, I was quite impressed with the climbing prowess of the 5.5. No exaggeration - you have to ride it to truly believe it.

    2) The 5.5 has snap. It snaps out of turns well and pops over stuff with ease. With the 90mm stem and Pro-Taper bars, the positioning to work the front end and pull it around it feels just right. It responds very well to rider input from working the bike to the quick-pedal snaps exiting turns.

    3) This area is a compromise. I knew that going into it. It's impossible to have the stability of a slacked out DH bike with the turning prowess of a quick-steering XC bike. Those are physics. Nonetheless, the 5.5 fits nicely between the two extremes.

    4) Well, it has gears and weighs probably about 27#. So, that was an easy goal to accomplish. It has gears, suspension, and climbs like a hardtail without having to deal with lock-out levers (which I always forget when I get to the top of the climb!). Again, it worked for #1, so that also helps in this catagory.

    5) This was somewhat of a given with this build. The 5.5 is the best combination of traits that I like that I think I could have come up with. I don't think any other frame could compare.

    On note that I'd like to add, if you do get an Intense, check the tightness of the hardware. On my 5.5, the lower shock bolt was close to finger tight. My frame is also a newer one that allows me to simply install pre-bled brake lines and zip-tie them to the frame (some earlier models, you had to thread the line through small holes then assemble and bleed the brakes). This is a plus. I do wish Intense include a chainstay protector (I wish all frame companies did). My biggest concern is the long-term durability of the bearings. I know people have had problems with bearings seizing on their Tracers and UZZIs. I also know that they loosen up over time (on all frames with bearings), so we'll see how that is after time. Bearings with adjustable preload? That'd be nice!

    Well, I have to get back to work. I will gladly answer any questions, and will post more when I get more time.

  7. #7
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    Pintense,
    From what I gather, the benefits between the 5.5 and the UZZI differ. The UZZI is more cushy while climbing, but that also can be the source of a loss of energy. The 5.5 somewhat locks out while pedaling (that's part of the VPP design), and therefore is not as cush while pedaling. The plus side (for me) is that when I quickly pedal hard while out of the saddle to clear an obstacle, the 5.5 locks out (I like that) and respondes like a hardtail. So it really depends on what you want out of the frame.

    The amount of abuse a frame can take is all relative. The 5.5 is a stout frameset and should hold up well for trail use. Like most frames intended for trail use, it wasn't designed to withstand huge drops. It's just a 6.5 pound frame. That's pretty light, but you can bet that I will spend quite a bit of time in the air on this thing! I am quite sure that I will destroy several rims before I crack the frame.

  8. #8
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    5.5 question

    blaster,

    could you do me a favor? on nice level ground, will you place your bike against a wall or door jamb and make a tick mark at the seat height, then roll your bike backwards and place your handlebar against the same spot and make another mark. will you then measure the difference in height between your seat and handlebars?

    this weary old back of mine can't take the 4" of fall from seat to bars anymore..... just wondering what you're running on the new bike.

    thanks

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sheikyerbouti

    this weary old back of mine can't take the 4" of fall from seat to bars anymore..... just wondering what you're running on the new bike.

    thanks
    Dang, even on my road bike I try not to go beyond a 3" drop. On my XC racing bikes I keep it to 1-2" at most.

  10. #10
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    The top of the handlebars sits just over an inch higher than the center of the seat (now a silver WTB Rocket V Stealth). I may lower the stem 5mm by removing a spacer.

    I rode the 5.5 this weekend, and found that I can climb it standing like on my singlespeed! The hill was rather long and steep, and most of my friends, including E-man, were running it in their granny gears. I pulled the hill in the middle front and middle rear. The bike stayed nice and solid, without bobbing or jacking. I was stoked! Not only is it a good workout, it's a lot faster for me.

    One word of caution: Do not over tighten the lower shock bolt. The part on the outsite (right side usually) that the head of the bolt is in will break. The problem is that this piece isn't long enough to bottom out on the link plate. I understand that Intense is aware of the problem and is working on improving this. If you do break this piece, keep the broken part in place, and install a washer on the outside of the bearing until you get the new piece from Intense (you'll have to take the bolt out to do this).

  11. #11
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    Another ride note.

    Another thing that I've noticed while riding is that the black, aluminum pivot bolt at the top of the right link (threads into frame) keeps coming loose. I have to tighten it several times over the course of a two- to three-hour ride. I'm sure blue Loc-tite will help, but I just need to remember to do it. I'll let you know if it works.

    I started to get a creak in the frame a little while ago, but it seems to be going away. It seems to be coming from a lower pivot (it's not the cranks or pedals, that I can tell - lot's of grease and teflon tape). I'll keep you posted on what I find, if the creak continues.

    I should have my King/819 wheels soon!

  12. #12
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    Thanks for the info on BEARINGS(SKF)

    Quote Originally Posted by pintense
    ,

    For the bearings, I removed all my spider's bearings and put Hi qualty SKF bearings where I put a huge amount og hi quality grease after removing the seals. So far no comparation with the original bad quality bearings.

    sorry my english.
    paulo from portugal
    I've done a lot of reading about bearings on the SKF site. There are a few different types of bearings that fit the requirements for MTN bike suspension. I haven't taken apart my bearings(Enduro) as to see what type they use, but I'm sure they are simply standard type ball bearings with rubber seals.

    On the site, it states that angular contact ball bearings and taper roller bearings are the best type for load stress from the top, bottom and side as a MTN bike suspension would have. Needle bearings are not good for this as some people have stated in the never ending discussion of bushing vs bearings.

    Anyway ,after looking at Boca and seeing all the options, I've noticed that you can opt for different types of balls and seals as well as types of bearings and grease. You can spend anywhere between $5.00 to $100 on one bearing. The quality and characteristics are up to you.

    My Tracer bearings have held up fine for almost two years. It's good to know I can actually improve the type of bearing to get a stiffer rear end and chose different balls and seals and grease to keep them from from deteriorating.

    Thanks!
    Don

  13. #13
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    Sweet

    Quote Originally Posted by Blaster1200
    Photo of me and the 5.5 at San Juan.
    Again, note that the wheels, brakes, and seat will change in the next week or so.
    Blaster

    Sweet bike mate. I'm from the UK where these frames are not in stock anywhere yet (and when they do they will cost £1,700). I am thinking of getting either a 5.5 or an Ellsworth Moment as I am looking for something that will climb and take the big hits. What do you think to the Ellsworth? Would be greatful for any advice

  14. #14
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    Stuss: CycleSurgery has 5.5 frames in stock

    Stuss: CycleSurgery has 5.5 frames in stock in London. I went to see one about three weeks ago. I think that particular frame might be gone by now but they said that they had more frames coming soon. The one that I saw was in their Camden store and it was red medium size frame. I think they don't advertise Intense frames on their website (http://www.cyclesurgery.com/) but they still carry those frames in stock.

    Pertti
    www.mckramppi.com

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by stuss
    Blaster

    Sweet bike mate. I'm from the UK where these frames are not in stock anywhere yet (and when they do they will cost £1,700). I am thinking of getting either a 5.5 or an Ellsworth Moment as I am looking for something that will climb and take the big hits. What do you think to the Ellsworth? Would be greatful for any advice

    I have never (or will ever) own an Ellsworth. Not that there is anything particularly wrong with them, I just don't like the styling, or geometry. You can read more about them in the Ellsworth forum. Several of my friends have Ellsworths. No thanks.

  16. #16
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    size

    Quote Originally Posted by Blaster1200
    I have never (or will ever) own an Ellsworth. Not that there is anything particularly wrong with them, I just don't like the styling, or geometry. You can read more about them in the Ellsworth forum. Several of my friends have Ellsworths. No thanks.
    Blaster

    What size is the frame in the photo. I would need a medium and just wondered whether the medium frame has a kinked top tube unlike the small which is straight.

    Cheers mate

  17. #17
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    dosh

    Quote Originally Posted by Portti
    Stuss: CycleSurgery has 5.5 frames in stock in London. I went to see one about three weeks ago. I think that particular frame might be gone by now but they said that they had more frames coming soon. The one that I saw was in their Camden store and it was red medium size frame. I think they don't advertise Intense frames on their website (http://www.cyclesurgery.com/) but they still carry those frames in stock.

    Pertti
    www.mckramppi.com
    Pertti

    How much were they and were you tempted??

  18. #18
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    Stuss: Yes I was tempted

    Stuss: Yes I was tempted.

    At the moment I have three options for a new frame: 5.5 EVP, Rocky Mountain ETS-X70 or Nicolai Helius CC. The Nicolai and RM are quite similar but the 5.5 EVP is bit heavier and has more suspension travel. 5.5 EVP looks very nice and I'm certainly considering buying one myself.

    I already forgot the UK price but I think it was 1.899 GBP since the Spider frame is 1.699 GBP and i think that 5.5 EVP was 200 pounds more. I couldn't find the prices from the Intense UK distributor site (http://www.nwmtb.com/index.asp) either but I have the Intense 2004 catalog at home which has the prices. I will check the price and give you more accurate information tomorrow. The price in Germany is almost the same as in the UK but the price in Finland (which is my home country) was a little bit cheaper. That was a big surprise because usually all the bike stuff is more expensive in Finland than in the UK or Germany.

    By the way, the medium size has a kinked top tube.

    Pertti
    www.mckramppi.com/en

  19. #19
    mtbr member
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    Rocky Mountain

    Quote Originally Posted by Portti
    Stuss: Yes I was tempted.

    At the moment I have three options for a new frame: 5.5 EVP, Rocky Mountain ETS-X70 or Nicolai Helius CC. The Nicolai and RM are quite similar but the 5.5 EVP is bit heavier and has more suspension travel. 5.5 EVP looks very nice and I'm certainly considering buying one myself.

    I already forgot the UK price but I think it was 1.899 GBP since the Spider frame is 1.699 GBP and i think that 5.5 EVP was 200 pounds more. I couldn't find the prices from the Intense UK distributor site (http://www.nwmtb.com/index.asp) either but I have the Intense 2004 catalog at home which has the prices. I will check the price and give you more accurate information tomorrow. The price in Germany is almost the same as in the UK but the price in Finland (which is my home country) was a little bit cheaper. That was a big surprise because usually all the bike stuff is more expensive in Finland than in the UK or Germany.


    By the way, the medium size has a kinked top tube.

    Pertti
    www.mckramppi.com/en

    Pertii

    My mate bought a Rocky Mountain ETS-X70 (last year) and had all sorts of trouble. The downtube craked in half during a light cross country ride while I was with him - unbelievable. Rocky Mountain replaced it without question but as soon as he had it back from Rocky he sold it.

    Just something to bear in mind - could be just a one off! He said the ride was great but after the frame snapping it just put him off the bike.

    Stuss
    Last edited by stuss; 03-25-2004 at 11:41 AM.

  20. #20
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    Stuss: The correct price of the 5.5 frame is 1,799 GBP

    Stuss: I checked the pricelist at home and the correct price for the 5.5 EVP is £1,799 so it is slightly cheaper than in Germany but more expensive than in Finland. Still, it is quite expensive frame.

    The options for the 5.5. EVP frame are:

    Silver finish + £50
    Ball Burnish finish + £100
    5th Element Air rear shock + £50

    The standard rear shock is Manitou Swinger Air 4-way but you can also have Fox Float for the same price.

    Thanks for the RM info.

    Pertti
    www.mckramppi.com/en

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Portti
    Stuss: I checked the pricelist at home and the correct price for the 5.5 EVP is £1,799 so it is slightly cheaper than in Germany but more expensive than in Finland. Still, it is quite expensive frame.

    The options for the 5.5. EVP frame are:

    Silver finish + £50
    Ball Burnish finish + £100
    5th Element Air rear shock + £50

    The standard rear shock is Manitou Swinger Air 4-way but you can also have Fox Float for the same price.

    Thanks for the RM info.

    Pertti
    www.mckramppi.com/en
    Pertti

    Found out some more RM info. Loads of the early ETS X70 frames snapped on the downtube. RM acknowledged there was a problem and have now beefed up the downtube on all the new models so you should be ok with one now. My bet would be to pay the extra and get the 5.5.

    Stuss

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by stuss
    Blaster

    What size is the frame in the photo. I would need a medium and just wondered whether the medium frame has a kinked top tube unlike the small which is straight.

    Cheers mate

    It's a medium.

    I finally got my wheels together. I will post a pic soon.

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