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  1. #1
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    Rock Shox Pike and Revelation: overkill?

    For the Foothills are the Rock Shox Pike or Revelation overkill?

    What about for the McCall or Sun Valley area? I do most of my riding (weekdays) in Boise so I don't want an overkill fork.

    Anyone use either of these longer travel forks up Hard Guy, down Bob's and twisting through Dry Creek and over the Ridge Road without complaint?

    Or the group ride to Reynold's Creek this weekend: anyone sporting a 5 inch fork?

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    EP you should take this one....
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by westin
    For the Foothills are the Rock Shox Pike or Revelation overkill?

    What about for the McCall or Sun Valley area? I do most of my riding (weekdays) in Boise so I don't want an overkill fork.

    Anyone use either of these longer travel forks up Hard Guy, down Bob's and twisting through Dry Creek and over the Ridge Road without complaint?

    Or the group ride to Reynold's Creek this weekend: anyone sporting a 5 inch fork?
    I have a 5" fox and a 5" manitou sherman and my wife has a 5" marzocchi. Yes, they are all overkill for the foothills, but I didn't buy them for the foothills. Almost anywhere that we ride outside of Boise, it is nice to have a little more cush. Being able to adjust the ride height for climbs (e.g. the marzocchi) is nice for long steep climps (e.g. bobs). If someone else wants to recommend a rock shox product, it's all yours (I'll keep my mouth shut).
    [SIZE=1]"Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race." - H.G. Wells[/SIZE]

  4. #4
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    I'd go 5" without any hesitation. I've been running a Zokie for years, and I've recently switched to a RS and it's been more reliable than my Zokie every was which is saying a lot.

    Don't worry about the 'overkill' factor, as there are plenty of rides in our immediate area that it makes it that much more fun to rake out the travel and let it rip. I would go Pike Air U-Turn and you'd have a light, stiff, strong fork with a quickly adjustable travel. The U-Turn is great because it's so quick and easy (don't have to hop off).
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  5. #5
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    I ride a 5" fox Talas in McCall (and everywhere else for that matter) it is mostly overkill, but it sure is nice to have sometimes. I haven't looked at the pike or revelation, but make sure they have on-the-fly travel adjust. Dialing the travel from 5" to 3" radically changes the feel of the bike. 5" = slow steering, plow through anything feeling. 3" = xc fast steering for the twisty singletrack. I'll climb the back side of Brundage in 3" mode, then crank it up to 5" for the ride down the front. Its the best of both worlds.

  6. #6
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    Pike

    I had a Pike Race coil with the U-turn - finally a decent fork from Rock Shox. Anyway it was stiff and worked great (sold it for a fork with less travel and weight). However if you aren't looking for drops like Zebdi or the Hucksters, 5" is overkill for most of the riding here in Idaho. It's really hot in the industry now to have a 5.5 - 6.5" trail bike, which is cool, but I would buy a bike with travel based on the terrain I spend 90% of my riding. A large travel trail bike would be best for Frutia, Moab or North Shore, etc; but if it's not your style or only travel to these types of places a few times a year, you're using a bazooka for deer hunting. I would recommend around 4" travel - it should be lighter, pedal pretty well uphill, and have plenty of cushion going down.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuna
    I had a Pike Race coil with the U-turn - finally a decent fork from Rock Shox. Anyway it was stiff and worked great (sold it for a fork with less travel and weight). However if you aren't looking for drops like Zebdi or the Hucksters, 5" is overkill for most of the riding here in Idaho. It's really hot in the industry now to have a 5.5 - 6.5" trail bike, which is cool, but I would buy a bike with travel based on the terrain I spend 90% of my riding. A large travel trail bike would be best for Frutia, Moab or North Shore, etc; but if it's not your style or only travel to these types of places a few times a year, you're using a bazooka for deer hunting. I would recommend around 4" travel - it should be lighter, pedal pretty well uphill, and have plenty of cushion going down.
    Good points. I have a 4" bike now, but I want more quality travel. Let me rephrase. I want more travel because I am 100% committed to not racing, and I want to do fun trail rides and let the extra travel bomb my way back down.

    I race motorcycles and the need for better and quality travel has always been in the back of my mind. Five inches of travel is all I want; never go bigger because I do like to climb. The frame I'm getting is a DW-Link so it climbs better in 5 inches than many frames do in 4 or less.

    Also, my 4" travel bike needs a platform because it has an RL, and that will cost about $175 to get it Pushed; may as well sell it and use the money toward a longer travel setup. It's a good dilemma, wouldn't you say??

  8. #8
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    I'll likely be the lone voice saying "don't do it." For the foothills, I prefer either a rigid bike, or a short travel front suspension hardtail. That's all you need. Bob's and Hull's are easily ridden on a rigid bike (a little slower for sure, but completely ridable). I've ridden up and down Hulls on my cyclocross bike many times, so there's no reason it can't be done. Full suspension is definitely nice on some of the Table Rock trails, and in the Bogus area, but it's not "required" by any means.

    Susupension certainly smooths out the trail, but if you're looking for a smooth trail, why not ride a road bike? That's my feeling anyway.

    A full suspension certainly makes longer rides in the Stanley area (or similar) possible, but for local trails it's overkill IMO. There's enough trail users locally, that riding a bike that makes you go slower is likely a good thing (especially in the lower foothills).

    Riding is about having fun and be challenged. A long-travel bike requires higher speeds to get the same "fun factor," and on many local trails a FS removes most/all of the challenge.

    Anyway, take that for what it's worth.
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    Good points, and I've seen rigid bikes in the Foothills and spoken to skilled riders who say the same thing, but... I have a bad back, and 10 minutes on a hardtail leaves me immobile for hours. Plus I'm not that skilled or technical to ride anything but fs.


    Quote Originally Posted by laffeaux
    I'll likely be the lone voice saying "don't do it." For the foothills, I prefer either a rigid bike, or a short travel front suspension hardtail. That's all you need. Bob's and Hull's are easily ridden on a rigid bike (a little slower for sure, but completely ridable). I've ridden up and down Hulls on my cyclocross bike many times, so there's no reason it can't be done. Full suspension is definitely nice on some of the Table Rock trails, and in the Bogus area, but it's not "required" by any means.

    Susupension certainly smooths out the trail, but if you're looking for a smooth trail, why not ride a road bike? That's my feeling anyway.

    A full suspension certainly makes longer rides in the Stanley area (or similar) possible, but for local trails it's overkill IMO. There's enough trail users locally, that riding a bike that makes you go slower is likely a good thing (especially in the lower foothills).

    Riding is about having fun and be challenged.

    A long-travel bike requires higher speeds to get the same "fun factor," and on many local trails a FS removes most/all of the challenge.

    Anyway, take that for what it's worth.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by westin
    Good points. I have a 4" bike now, but I want more quality travel. Let me rephrase. I want more travel because I am 100% committed to not racing, and I want to do fun trail rides and let the extra travel bomb my way back down.
    I went from a 3.5" travel Superlight to a much heavier 5" travel Ventana X-5 last year. Is it "overkill" for the foothills? Yes, it sure is. (Heck, anything more than a rigid singlespeed is probably overkill for the foothills, per Laffeaux.) Is it a more fun a versatile bike than the Superlight? Yes, it sure is. Do I regret it? Heck no. I say go for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimi1114
    I ride a 575 with a fox 36 RC2 and I don't believe it is overkill at all. The fork is relatively light for a long travel fork, is super plush and provides a level of steering precision that I really enjoy. If you want to ride lift assisted runs (Brundage) you can, or you can drop the travel for climbing. The Fork also offers several adjustments for compression and rebound. I originally got the bike with the Fox Talas RLC and it just had too much flex for me. The 36 doesn’t move at all. That has a lot to do with the 20 mm through axle as well which you have to take into consideration. I not only climb and descend the likes of Hulls and Hard Guy with no problem with the fork, I do it on flats as well. I like having the travel when I want it for the more tech./aggressive trail type of stuff and higher descent speeds. In my opinion these forks just give you a much broader spectrum of riding opportunities. That's just my two cents.
    Thanks to all. I've decided on either the 2005 Rock Shox Pike Team or the 2006 Pike 426 U-Turn. Never even shopped for a thru-axle hub/wheel so this should be an experience, ha.

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    Quote Originally Posted by westin
    Good points, and I've seen rigid bikes in the Foothills and spoken to skilled riders who say the same thing, but... I have a bad back, and 10 minutes on a hardtail leaves me immobile for hours. Plus I'm not that skilled or technical to ride anything but fs.



    I ride a 575 with a fox 36 RC2 and I don't believe it is overkill at all. The fork is relatively light for a long travel fork, is super plush and provides a level of steering precision that I really enjoy. If you want to ride lift assisted runs (Brundage) you can, or you can drop the travel for climbing. The Fork also offers several adjustments for compression and rebound. I originally got the bike with the Fox Talas RLC and it just had too much flex for me. The 36 doesn’t move at all. That has a lot to do with the 20 mm through axle as well which you have to take into consideration. I not only climb and descend the likes of Hulls and Hard Guy with no problem with the fork, I do it on flats as well. I like having the travel when I want it for the more tech./aggressive trail type of stuff and higher descent speeds. In my opinion these forks just give you a much broader spectrum of riding opportunities. That's just my two cents.

  13. #13
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    OK.... I'll throw in a nickel

    Quote Originally Posted by westin
    Thanks to all. I've decided on either the 2005 Rock Shox Pike Team or the 2006 Pike 426 U-Turn. Never even shopped for a thru-axle hub/wheel so this should be an experience, ha.
    I have the Rockshox Pike Race (Same as the new 426) and I can say great things about its reliability and serviceability. I have this fork on a bike with 4" of rear suspension and it feels great. That said, the foothills don't demand any type of particular travel or bike. The trails are what you make them, not what everybody says how you should ride them. For that matter, if I listened to every butthole in this valley who told me my Santa Cruz Heckler was totally overkill for this area I probably would have quit riding long ago. Fact is, even without overwhelming technical trails around here, the trails are what you make them. I've manage to have a really good time since I've lived here riding these same trails. More travel, while not necessary, may encourage you to ride a little more aggressively. Is this bad, nope, not as long as its not at the expence of someone else's happiness. If it make you grin while riding and helps you stay motivated to ride, then more travel has done its job. Give me a call at Reed's and I can offer some suggestions on 20mm wheels, even if you don't buy them from us. It would be great to have you stoked on your new setup, regardless of where you purchased it at.

    Laffeaux.....evolve. Its not personal, but embrace the new technology MTB's have to offer. You might just find out how wrong you've been this whole time. Buy a bike above your current technical level and grow into it. You'd be surprised how much fun riding can be when your pushing yourself technically and accomplishing new personal goals. Not a personal attack, just an opinion based on your posts.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by westin
    Never even shopped for a thru-axle hub/wheel so this should be an experience, ha.
    Look at the Hope hubs that can convert from a QR to a 20mm thru, ala the Bulb or the new Pro II.

    BTW, what's with the plug for Suncor on your signature? Do you have some connection to Avimor?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by westin
    Or the group ride to Reynold's Creek this weekend: anyone sporting a 5 inch fork?
    If memory serves correctly, I think that 6 out of 9 riders had at least a 125mm travel fork, or one that would adjust out that far. Two guys had short travel (80mm) forks, and Laffeaux, god love him, was running a rigid fork.

    Speaking of, and in regards to Ivan's comment to Laffeaux to "evolve," I say to each their own. First, I bought a bike above my technical level last year, but I can't say it made me a better rider or even pushed me to risk injury or bike damage just so I could say I rode a technical feature I had never ridden before. Second, Laffeaux proved himself to be one hell of a great rider, and had no problems keeping up on the ride, even on the bumpy or rockier sections. I don't know if that means he's a great rider, or the rest of us are crappy riders, or some combo thereof, but it was fun to watch him clean some of the rocky uphill sections on a rigid bike that certain of us (me included) were having trouble with on 5" boingers.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivan the Terrible
    Laffeaux.....evolve.
    This could get interesting.
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  17. #17
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    That's because...

    Quote Originally Posted by Earthpig
    First, I bought a bike above my technical level last year, but I can't say it made me a better rider or even pushed me to risk injury or bike damage just so I could say I rode a technical feature I had never ridden before.
    Your being a pu$$y!!. Just kidding. I'm not trying to start any crap here. I totally agree with your comments and don't think everyone should ride the same kind of bike as I do. Really, I agree about "to each his own". If your having a good time, that's awesome.

    And Laffeaux.... I'm not attacking you personally, really. I just wanted to present the other side. I really do hold folks who ride rigid artfully in high regard. Its been so long since I've done that I don't know if I could do it well anymore. No offense......really.

    Oh and Earthpig, do you really think I like to ride technical lines, jumps, and drops just so I can tell everyone about it. C'mon, you know me better than that

  18. #18
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    Si senor

    Quote Originally Posted by westin
    Or the group ride to Reynold's Creek this weekend: anyone sporting a 5 inch fork?
    I sport a 5" Zochi on my 04 Kona Coiler. It's the low-end OEM Drop-Off Comp 130mm which works fine for me. Maybe I don't know any better and ignorance is bliss. Had it overhauled in Moab last year with some heavier oil, but that's it, no other maintenance.
    Plush enough for my drops and hits, stiff enough for my climbing needs (I'm pretty slow).

    I've read nothing but good about those Pikes though.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivan the Terrible
    Laffeaux.....evolve. Its not personal, but embrace the new technology MTB's have to offer.
    I have. I own a 4.5" travel Santa Cruz and love it. I'll ride it up Hard Guy, on the Bogus Trails, and on Table Rock. However, on most of the lower foothills trails it's less fun than an old beater bike. The suspension turns a fun trail into a sidewalk. It's a lot more fun to me to climb Bob's on a rigid bike than on my Blur.

    If you can only have one bike, a full-suspension is fine. But I'd rather ride my FS on trails where it makes them more enjoyable, and use less technology on trails where it's not needed.

    Ride Bob's on a CX bike sometime and try not to dab. IMO It's a larger accomplishment than doing it on a FS.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  20. #20
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    Agreed

    I don't personally enjoy riding CX bikes like that. I know its tough but its just not my cup of joe. Similarly, I have noticed that Bob's and Hull's are both more fun on my 4" FS than on my 7" FS. So while I'm not riding a rigid bike, I do know what your getting at. Sometimes too much travel isn't worthwhile, at least not around here.

    I reserve the hardtail for dirtjumping and street riding only. I used to have a Kona Score, ti hardtail, that I wished I had never sold because it would have made an excellent foothills bike, but hindsight is 20/20 or so they say.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivan the Terrible
    Your being a pu$$y!!. Just kidding. I'm not trying to start any crap here. I totally agree with your comments and don't think everyone should ride the same kind of bike as I do. Really, I agree about "to each his own". If your having a good time, that's awesome.

    And Laffeaux.... I'm not attacking you personally, really. I just wanted to present the other side. I really do hold folks who ride rigid artfully in high regard. Its been so long since I've done that I don't know if I could do it well anymore. No offense......really.

    Oh and Earthpig, do you really think I like to ride technical lines, jumps, and drops just so I can tell everyone about it. C'mon, you know me better than that
    Anybody who rides with me knows I'm a huge wuss on technical drops. No bike or amount of travel is going to get me past my fear of falling and getting injured. And, about riding a rigid bike, I do that about 2x a week and it's a great way to feel very connected to the trail, but sheer hell on my arthritic wrists and hands.

  22. #22
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    Westin - Wool & spackle comments aside, if the boing gets you sprung, you should go for it. I hear the new generation of RS forks work really well. And for the 20mm, ask Ian to show you RS's 20mm thru-axle setup. If I remember the RS forks have a Maxle (sp?) quick release, which is a little different and can save you some hassle on the trail.
    ...building wherever they'll let me...

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivan the Terrible
    Laffeaux.....evolve.
    If evolution is outlawed only outlaws will ride long travel sleds.

    Getting back to OT, me thinks a bike is overkill only if said rider does not try to use said bike to it's full potential.

    I should write a book on philosophy. That way I could justify eating salad with my fingers.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Visicypher
    Filipinos already eat with their fingers...does that make philosophers of us all?
    Naw. It makes you poets and performance artists.
    Nobody cares what kind of bike you ride.

  25. #25
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    Filipinos already eat with their fingers...does that make philosophers of us all?
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