Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    90

    Recommendations for single chainring

    I'm going to convert my x-cal to a 1x10 and I'd like some recommendations on the chainring size for the Boise foothills trails. The 44t big ring is probably a bit too big, but the middle ring is too small. I want to still be able to climb 3 bears, sidewinder, Hard Guy etc...

    I was thinking the e.13 38t. What are you guys running out there?

    I'm a reasonably strong rider. I single speed pretty regularly, which is why I'm wanting to simplify my x-cal. I drop chains off the front more often than I'd like pedaling between jumps or rough sections.

    I'm going to run without a bash guard so I assume all I'll need some single chainring bolts, a chainguide, and the ring.

    Thoughts?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: flipnidaho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    6,418
    if you're riding all day and in no hurry on the downhills, go 34T and 11-36.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    90
    I'm in a bit of a hurry downhill - I don't want to lose too much top end ability on the low grade downs.. I'm used to high cadence.. but the single speed doesn't cut it across freeway, down red cliffs, down bucktail etc... That's kinda why I was thinking 38t - I've never tried it though and I don't want to throw away money.. of course that's what bikes are for.
    Last edited by stackwalker; 07-18-2012 at 02:10 PM.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    972
    do a 2x10 with a chain guard and you got all day fast downhill and all day mountain climbing.
    I like to go downhill fast and have gone to a 2x10 and there are times i miss the big ring, but i would never ever give up my tiny front ring for the mountain climbing.

  5. #5
    gringo-fied facsimiles
    Reputation: surly_an_instigator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    397

    I agree with flip

    I would be very suprised if you could push a 38t in the foothills, not saying it cant be done, and there might be some animal out there reading this that is, but that is a BIG gear. what gear do you run now on some of these trails? I, and the majority of the people I ride with, have been on 1x9 and 1x10 for the last 5 years or so. Most of us are 32t a couple of the hard cores on a 34t. Some of these guys hold some of the fastest times on strava on the downhills so they arent missing any gears. renthal and raceface make some great chainrings.
    http://www.bradwaltonphoto.com
    "you slow whitted rectal beltch" -sp

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    90
    Okay - 38t too big - good info.

    I've been doing the single speed thing for the last few weeks and really like the simplicity of it, so I'm looking to dumb down my geared bike a bit. I managed sidewinder on my single speed 32x18, but it was a groaner. I think the biggest gear I'd want to ride on the steep stuff like 3 bears connector, 8th st motorcycle trail etc.. is 2-1, 2-2 with my current setup. I'm a tech gear newbie so I don't know what all the ratios really translate to when I'm riding.

    I'd like to think that I could handle the 34t up front, but I'm not sure if it's going to turn into a 2 hour stand and mash or pedestrian event on Hard Guy. Perhaps I'll play it safe and start with the 32t and see where it goes from there. I can always reuse the 32t on my SS.

    Thanks!

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    98
    If you're referring to your mtb gears as 2-1,2-2, then most likely 2-1 is 32-32, since most mtb cranksets are 22/32/44, and the most common cassette is 11-32. Just guessing, though.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    90
    yeah.. pretty sure I have a 22/32/44. What's the right way to refer to the gear position?

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    98
    I don't think there's a "right" way, but higher end shifters don't have the numbers, so most folks will use the tooth counts or gear inches.

    But it sounds like you're currently using a 32t ring on the harder climbs, so a 38t would be a hard step up indeed.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    98
    But, if I'm right about that being a 32-32 combo, and you're switching to an 11-36 10-speed cassette, then you could use a 36t ring and have the same low-end. If you're leaving your cassette as is, then stick with a 32t ring, IMO.

    Google "gear inch calculator", and you can put in chainring and cog sizes, and find what would be equivalent.

  11. #11
    bike me, then beer me
    Reputation: brewidaho's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    88
    What size wheel are you running? It does matter. I run 29".I just put a 11-36 cassette on my soon to be 1x9 where I run a 32t chainring. Works great for all the footies, wilson and bogus. That extra big gear on the back allows me to not use the small 22 at all, so i will only use for the hangover rides! I have a single speed with a 32t too, so the gearing is not so foreign when I switch bikes.

    Hope that helps!

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    90
    It's a 29er. I figured it played a part - the wheel is just another cog in the drivetrain.

    Is the cassette swap straightforward if I were to switch out to the 11-36? I am pretty new to all this part swapping business. Up until this year I have been a rider who just left my bike stock and beat the crap out of it for five or ten years.

  13. #13
    More cowbell!
    Reputation: spudbumkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    26
    I'm a big fat fatty and I run 1X9 on my 29er. 32t front chain ring and 11-34 on the cassette. Cllimbing Sidewinder isn't too hard, but the steep part of trail 5 above the big power line makes me get off and push. I am just too gassed after long haul from the shooting range. I also have to push on the steep parts of 3 Bears. Plenty of gear on the downhills, I don't get into 9th until I'm on the pavement down 8th St. or going down Mountain Cove Rd. Removing cassettes is easy; one needs a cassette removal tool ($5 bucks) and a chain whip ($15 bucks), Google is your friend!

  14. #14
    FASTER, DAMIT, FASTER
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    145
    I've been running a 1x for about 4 years now, I find that I like the 32t in the early parts of the season and move on to the 34t a little later in the season when I'm feeling stronger.

    Cassette swaps are simple...if you got the right tools. You'll need a chain whip and a cassette lockring tool. Without them it can be mighty difficult.

    I've had really great luck with E Thirteen rings. They last quite a while, have great performance, and don't cost a crazy amount.

    Welcome to the club.
    DON'T EXTINGUISH THE STOKE.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •