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  1. #1
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    mountain lion spotted on rocky canyon road

    my mom saw a mountain lion on the road about a half mile to three quarters a mile past the cattle grate this morning. She said it looked as big as a retriever, and it was standing on the road when she turned the corner. There was another man on the other side of the mountain lion, and they both saw it. The lion crossed the road down to the creek on the other side. scary stuff.
    It's all downhill from here.
    (There's a **** of a lot of climbing left.)

  2. #2
    Cleavage Of The Tetons
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    There are so many mountain lions here, it's not worth a forum post. I see at least one every two years.
    "We LOVE cows! They make trails for us.....

    And then we eat them."

  3. #3
    Sheepherder/Cat Herder Moderator
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    That wasn't a mountain lion. That was huckin kitty.
    ...building wherever they'll let me...

  4. #4
    TRAIL KUBUKI CORNDOGGER
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    Truth is stranger than fiction. This one showed up in my back yard.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails mountain lion spotted on rocky canyon road-kitty.jpg  

    Nobody cares what kind of bike you ride.

  5. #5
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    do you think there are a lot of big cats in the Boise area?
    It's all downhill from here.
    (There's a **** of a lot of climbing left.)

  6. #6
    Sheepherder/Cat Herder Moderator
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    those things are dangerous I tell ya....
    ...building wherever they'll let me...

  7. #7
    Sheepherder/Cat Herder Moderator
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    definitely a lot of cougars...
    ...building wherever they'll let me...

  8. #8
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    Visicypher...I agree with your sightings...I have seen a few cougars in the foothills. They are dangerous upon encounter, but in the end they turn up to be somewhat harmless.

  9. #9
    Cleavage Of The Tetons
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    Their divorce lawyers, however, tend to be masters of evisceration.
    "We LOVE cows! They make trails for us.....

    And then we eat them."

  10. #10
    Sheepherder/Cat Herder Moderator
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    now those are fierce lil' buggers...
    ...building wherever they'll let me...

  11. #11
    TRAIL KUBUKI CORNDOGGER
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    Quote Originally Posted by rideit
    Their divorce lawyers, however, tend to be masters of evisceration.
    At least it's the lawyers that are the masters of evisceration. I would never want to be labelled as a master of evisceration. That would be pretty embarassing. Just ask the Earthpig.
    Nobody cares what kind of bike you ride.

  12. #12
    Back of the pack fat guy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Visicypher
    definitely a lot of cougars...
    I'll second that observation about the cougar population in Boise. I've had my own personal experiences with the Boise cougars. They tend to roam the foothills in packs, usually preying on ususpecting male riders. Just so we're clear, I'm referring to "cougars" of the female human sort, not of the feline variety, of course.

    And Twisted, I think you meant "emasculation."
    Last edited by Earthpig; 02-22-2011 at 01:04 PM.

  13. #13
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    in all seriousness, if you have deer you have mountain lions. they go hand in hand. you usually see the deer and don't see the lions but they are there. Nothing to be worried about they where always there.

  14. #14
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    I saw a couple of wolves in my headlamp beam on the Bogus skate ski trails last night. How b!tchin is that, to have these Marty Stauffer moments? It's one of the joys of living in the intermountain west. I was hpoing they'd take out some of those lycra warrior racer boy puffers that were getting their pacelines on.

    If you haven't seen mountain lions or wolves on your local rides, then you don't spend enough time on your bike.
    Nobody cares what kind of bike you ride.

  15. #15
    Braille Riding Instructor
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwistedCrank
    If you haven't seen mountain lions or wolves on your local rides, then you don't spend enough time on your bike.
    Mountain lions are occasionally spotted near the trails around Poky, and I've heard of one person who claimed to have seen a wolf near Scout Mountain, but neither is common.

    I did ride right by a moose last spring, only the second one I've seen up close. They are ironically majestic animals for such awkward-looking beasts.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwistedCrank
    I saw a couple of wolves in my headlamp beam on the Bogus skate ski trails last night. How b!tchin is that, to have these Marty Stauffer moments? It's one of the joys of living in the intermountain west. I was hpoing they'd take out some of those lycra warrior racer boy puffers that were getting their pacelines on.

    If you haven't seen mountain lions or wolves on your local rides, then you don't spend enough time on your bike.
    sorry for the post to inform people on a popular road where a lot of people go running by themselves or with their dogs.
    It's all downhill from here.
    (There's a **** of a lot of climbing left.)

  17. #17
    Sheepherder/Cat Herder Moderator
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    mzinn - Cougars, the animal kind, have been spotted on the Greenbelt, in Military Reserve, Upper Hulls Gulch, etc. I've even chased a handful of deer down Warm Springs Rd on my bike and seen foxes and coyotes in Ann Morrison.

    hd - you are lucky in that you only have 2 moose sitings under your belt. for a while this past summer, I had moose encounters every ride. if it wasn't a moose, it was a bear. I still remember when All Talk watch as a cougar tried to take a fawn by where he was parking.

    As TC and Tim elude to and anyone who has rode in the interior of BC, it is mountain biking...watch out for the animals.
    ...building wherever they'll let me...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Visicypher
    you are lucky in that you only have 2 moose sitings under your belt. for a while this past summer, I had moose encounters every ride. if it wasn't a moose, it was a bear. I still remember when All Talk watch as a cougar tried to take a fawn by where he was parking.
    I've seen several from a distance, but only two up close. And I see moose scat all the time when I'm cross-country skiing or riding. Strange stuff. Looks like Milk Duds. If you tell me it tastes like Milk Duds, I will take your word for it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Visicypher
    As TC and Tim elude to and anyone who has rode in the interior of BC, it is mountain biking...watch out for the animals.
    BC as in some place near Boise and not British Columbia? Odd that bears are still a common sight around Boise. Are these black bears?

  19. #19
    Sheepherder/Cat Herder Moderator
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    LOL. hd, you were correct the first time in assuming British Columbia. Bears still do exist in the Stack Rock and Dry Creek areas. However, in Coeur d'Alene (where I call home now), I think there are more bears and critters running around. In the Kootenays in British Columbia, grizz, cougar, and moose are the critters I look out for when doing big backcountry rides.

    As for the moose, the little guy I used to see all the time...and I got to see way too often up close. The big bull....well, I didn't like seeing him up close...but I did at least on one occasion. I was lucky. The encounter scared the crap out of both of us, and he ran off. He was a big boy...and I am glad he ran off. A black bear cut a ride my son and I were doing short.

    As for the Milk Duds, I can't verify that for you. I have heard grizz crap smells like peppers....
    ...building wherever they'll let me...

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Visicypher
    LOL. hd, you were correct the first time in assuming British Columbia.
    Gotcha. I remember watching a documentary about animal attacks a couple of years ago that stated cougar attacks on humans are more prevalent on Vancouver Island than anywhere else on the continent.

    Quote Originally Posted by Visicypher
    As for the moose, the little guy I used to see all the time...and I got to see way too often up close. The big bull....well, I didn't like seeing him up close...but I did at least on one occasion. I was lucky. The encounter scared the crap out of both of us, and he ran off. He was a big boy...and I am glad he ran off. A black bear cut a ride my son and I were doing short.
    The first moose I saw up close and personal was several years ago while jogging on the Pocatello Greenway. It was a young bull moose.

    The second moose was last April as I was flying down the Upper City Creek trail on my mountain bike. I don't know enough about moose to know how quickly bulls regrow their antlers, but this one had none. I'm guessing it was probably a cow, but it was still a very, very large animal.

  21. #21
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    What are the odds?

    Life is so damned coincidental at times it leaves me dumbfounded.

    I say that because I went cross-country skiing twice today and had to cut the second stint short because, about three-quarters of the way up, a moose was standing in the middle of the trail about 30 yards ahead of me as I came around a turn.

    During my first ski earlier that day, I passed a skier coming down who said she had seen a cow and her calf in the area. I saw no sign of a calf, so I don't know if I saw the same cow, but I decided not to hang around and find out.

    Bittersweet for me because I had the camera with me on the first ski but not the second. However, I did take a picture in the morning from the same spot where I saw the moose later that afternoon. Here it is:



    So make that three moose that I've seen up close and personal.

  22. #22
    Cleavage Of The Tetons
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    I see swampdonkeys pretty much every day.


    Dumb fVckers.
    "We LOVE cows! They make trails for us.....

    And then we eat them."

  23. #23
    TRAIL KUBUKI CORNDOGGER
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    Quote Originally Posted by rideit
    I see swampdonkeys pretty much every day.
    I just wanted to point out that the Urban Dictionary has several definitions for swamp donkey:
    • A really sloppy, annoying, and usually slightly overweight sorority girl. She's most likely the black sheep of the group. This girl will be the most drunk, the most forward, and the most not attractive.
    • Woman so ugly you wouldn't touch her with a barge pole strapped to the end of a pole vault pole.
    • Although it is typically used as a noun, ie "she's a swampdonkey" (referring to a particularly nasty female) it can also be used as an exclamation of immunity. If a male and his peers go to a social function, one male from the group is allowed to claim "swampdonkey". This allows said male to take home even the dirtiest of barflies home with him while his mates are not allowed to give him a hard time of any kind. This is typically used when a male is on an extended dry spell.
    • A girl that has just gotten a train run on her. Think about it, swamps are disgusting and full of nastiness and everyone can ride on a donkey.


    I just thought I'd put that out there.

    It's beyond the pale, really
    Nobody cares what kind of bike you ride.

  24. #24
    Braille Riding Instructor
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    Well, that's a weight off me mind.

  25. #25
    Boise, ID
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwistedCrank
    I saw a couple of wolves in my headlamp beam on the Bogus skate ski trails last night. How b!tchin is that, to have these Marty Stauffer moments? It's one of the joys of living in the intermountain west. I was hpoing they'd take out some of those lycra warrior racer boy puffers that were getting their pacelines on.

    If you haven't seen mountain lions or wolves on your local rides, then you don't spend enough time on your bike.
    Not neccissarily. My pops is a retired logger from the heart of spotted owl country in Oregon. He spent most of his life in the woods, many years as a timber faller and never saw a spotted owl or a cougar in the woods, and only a handfull of bears.
    Some people are just luckier(or unlucky depending on how you see it) when it comes to spotting wildlife.

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