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  1. #1
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    Forest Jobs and Recreation Act

    An almost civil discussion is going on over at New West magazine. Important topic that will also affect Idaho by it's closures of the CDT.

    http://www.newwest.net/topic/article.../L41/#comments

    Many good points are made, the way people find to articulate ideas makes me jealous of their talent.
    I don't know what trail we're on, but at least it's getting dark

  2. #2
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    These trail closures would violate the free and unencumbered interstate travel clause of the interstate commerce act.

    Also, wilderness can't be made or (re-)created. No experiments necessary.

  3. #3
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    I've got an idea; why don't we work with the Forest Service to build MORE trails close to town in areas where the riding would be great and the controversy would be nonexistent. I'm just not that into 100 mile car shuttles...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Galbraith
    I've got an idea; why don't we work with the Forest Service to build MORE trails close to town in areas where the riding would be great and the controversy would be nonexistent. I'm just not that into 100 mile car shuttles...
    There is two answers to this question.

    100+ miles shuttles have their place, they really do. The great rides and destinations have no substitute.

    And if we didn't have to fight the wilderness movement, we could focus on trails closer in. But to that end, we are working hard on trails close in (to Bozeman), and have a grand scheme cooking to radically make improvements over the next few years.
    I don't know what trail we're on, but at least it's getting dark

  5. #5
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    how much space do hikers need to have to themselves and who is paying for it

    Designated wilderness areas in the United States total 103.8 million acres( bigger than all of Montana), according to the Congressional Research Service. Of that, the U.S. Forest Service administers 34.7 million acres. Another 60 million acres of USFS managed land is considered wild, or roadless, but is not officially designated as wilderness. Besides the Forest Service, wilderness areas are administered by the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
    billions a year of deficit spending for a few thousand people to enjoy.
    how far into a wilderness area can a family get?
    or how about a disabled person?
    of course an out of work person could probably get maybe 20 miles into one

    the more land that is closed off, the more we import goods and devalue our dollar
    just another side to the land issue

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbmitch2
    the more land that is closed off, the more we import goods and devalue our dollar
    just another side to the land issue
    Hmm, that's a leap in cause & effect... Generally, the lower the value of $$, the lower the trade deficit due to exports increasing and imports decreasing. US goods become cheaper overseas. This is exactly the situation that is going on currently as the $$ continues to lower in value and the trade deficit drops. In moderation, this is consider good economic news.

  7. #7
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    Why do you guys even give a sh$t about Testers bill?. Has anybody read this thing?. I believe if you do, you will realize it does not have a chance in hell of passing. And as we (I) speak, Tester is selling out to any user group that knocks on his door, that includes atv users, extractive industries, etc. This is not just speculation is it Greg? You want access?, get ready to share it with motor heads, miners, and loggers, then we can bit$h about that.

  8. #8
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    Designated wilderness areas in the United States total 103.8 million acres( bigger than all of Montana), according to the Congressional Research Service. Of that, the U.S. Forest Service administers 34.7 million acres. Another 60 million acres of USFS managed land is considered wild, or roadless, but is not officially designated as wilderness. Besides the Forest Service, wilderness areas are administered by the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
    billions a year of deficit spending for a few thousand people to enjoy.
    how far into a wilderness area can a family get?
    or how about a disabled person?
    of course an out of work person could probably get maybe 20 miles into one
    Mitch, rewilding America isn't about "strengthening the economy" and "providing access". You should know that.

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