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  1. #1
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    Yeti 575 vs. Ibis Mojo

    Anybody have the opportunity to ride the new carbon mojo? Geometry looks pretty similar to a 575, travel is pretty close and it uses the same RP23 that on the 575s now, as well as specing a 140mm fork which it seems is ideal for the 575. Just curious to hear if anybody has personal experience on both and what kind of comparisons can be drawn between the two bikes.

  2. #2
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by jboysen
    Anybody have the opportunity to ride the new carbon mojo? Geometry looks pretty similar to a 575, travel is pretty close and it uses the same RP23 that on the 575s now, as well as specing a 140mm fork which it seems is ideal for the 575. Just curious to hear if anybody has personal experience on both and what kind of comparisons can be drawn between the two bikes.
    I doubt you will find many who have written the Ibis since it is so new and still kind of difficut to get.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jboysen
    Anybody have the opportunity to ride the new carbon mojo? Geometry looks pretty similar to a 575, travel is pretty close and it uses the same RP23 that on the 575s now, as well as specing a 140mm fork which it seems is ideal for the 575. Just curious to hear if anybody has personal experience on both and what kind of comparisons can be drawn between the two bikes.
    You may want to ask on the Ibis board or the Iron Horse board (since the Mojo and the IH both uses the DW link for suspension). It looks like the Mojo and the 575 carbon frames weigh about the same.

  4. #4
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    never mind....forget i was here.

  5. #5
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    The mojo is sweet looking. However, I'm thinking that carbon frame will come at a higher price.
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  6. #6
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    Holly Shiot. What more can I say. Took the Mojo out to Rockville
    (in Fairfield, CA) last Saturday and was just completely blown away. I
    thought the Blur was a great bike, but now I know what a great bike
    is. I was expecting great improvements on the down hill aggressive
    stuff. And it truly is much more like the Nomad once aimed down
    hill. However, where I was really surprised was on the ups. Techy
    very steep climbing stuff was so easy, the Mojo totally kept it's
    line and stay planted on the ground. And, in general, climbing is
    so crisp and efficient, with this bike I feel like a much stronger
    climber... Amazing!!!


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jboysen
    Anybody have the opportunity to ride the new carbon mojo? Geometry looks pretty similar to a 575, travel is pretty close and it uses the same RP23 that on the 575s now, as well as specing a 140mm fork which it seems is ideal for the 575. Just curious to hear if anybody has personal experience on both and what kind of comparisons can be drawn between the two bikes.
    Ibis Mojo certainly looks sweet, and I'd love to ride one but I'm just not sold on the idea of a carbon frame "all mountain" bike. My 575 takes a lot of abuse from rocks, falls, transport and carbon can be damaged by these types of things.

    I love my full carbon fiber road bike, its super compliant and light, but I'll take aluminum for blasting 25mph+ down the ski resort trails.

    Not trying to talk you out of a Mojo, if you can find one to test I'd say absolutely do it as it looks impressive in pics and on paper. I'm just trying to give you some food for thought about the potential drawbacks to it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jdub
    Ibis Mojo certainly looks sweet, and I'd love to ride one but I'm just not sold on the idea of a carbon frame "all mountain" bike. My 575 takes a lot of abuse from rocks, falls, transport and carbon can be damaged by these types of things.

    I love my full carbon fiber road bike, its super compliant and light, but I'll take aluminum for blasting 25mph+ down the ski resort trails.

    Not trying to talk you out of a Mojo, if you can find one to test I'd say absolutely do it as it looks impressive in pics and on paper. I'm just trying to give you some food for thought about the potential drawbacks to it.
    The only mountainbike I've ever snapped was an AL bike (old-old Fisher Supercaliber, pre-Trek). I've used and abused (and still do) ti, steel, and carbon mountainbikes without problems. Up until the 575, I was riding a Fuel 100 (built stupid-light) and have crashed it a number of times in Moab, Fruita, Idaho, etc... without failure...
    Of course, YRMV and the durability of carbon (vs. AL) is probably more dependent on the manufacturer's design and QC than anything else...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by flipnidaho
    The only mountainbike I've ever snapped was an AL bike (old-old Fisher Supercaliber, pre-Trek). I've used and abused (and still do) ti, steel, and carbon mountainbikes without problems. Up until the 575, I was riding a Fuel 100 (built stupid-light) and have crashed it a number of times in Moab, Fruita, Idaho, etc... without failure...
    Of course, YRMV and the durability of carbon (vs. AL) is probably more dependent on the manufacturer's design and QC than anything else...
    Yeah I've snapped an aluminum mountain bike as well. Not trying to say that aluminum is immune to its problems, but I worry about how gracefully a carbon bike would take a fall into some jagged rocks.

    I don't worry about snapping it, more about scraping it badly in a crash/slow speed fall-over type accident. Maybe my concerns are not just, but just last weekend my Big Betty slammed a fist-sized rock into my downtube. It chipped the paint, but nothing more than a cosmetic problem. Would a carbon downtube been able to sustain that impact? I don't know, but its something I would seriously consider before buying a carbon bike.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the replies guys, keep 'em comin! I'm curious to hear from Ibis as to what the Mojo's durability is supposed to be like. I agree that chucking the bike into a rock garden seems like it would cause more damage to the carbon frame than to an aluminum frame, but I think it's also possible the perceived damage would be much worse than it actually was.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jboysen
    Thanks for the replies guys, keep 'em comin! I'm curious to hear from Ibis as to what the Mojo's durability is supposed to be like. I agree that chucking the bike into a rock garden seems like it would cause more damage to the carbon frame than to an aluminum frame, but I think it's also possible the perceived damage would be much worse than it actually was.
    Check out the Ibis web site www.ibisbicycles.com. They have a whole seciton on carbon technology, comparing it to other materials (al, Ti, ChroMo...). It sounds pretty darn strong. They also have a seciton on fixing Carbon, which is relatively easy to do. Reparis cost anywhere from $35 for small stuff to about $250 for something that would be a dead frame of any other material.

    I am not sure if I am selling the Mojo to you all or to myslef. But I took a chance. Baught this bike sight-un-seen, and now that I have it I am really happy. Nothing but smiles.

  12. #12
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    Another thing I should mention is that the guys at Ibis are really cool. Definite small company mentality. They are easy to get in touch with, return calls and emails and care about their bikes and customers. That is a rare quality these days.

  13. #13
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    The pricing isn't bad. I thought it would be more than 1899.
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  14. #14
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    that ibis looks cool..and yea, i try to support small companies as much as i can myself...

  15. #15
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    does it come in turquazee?yes i did it

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jboysen
    Thanks for the replies guys, keep 'em comin! I'm curious to hear from Ibis as to what the Mojo's durability is supposed to be like. I agree that chucking the bike into a rock garden seems like it would cause more damage to the carbon frame than to an aluminum frame, but I think it's also possible the perceived damage would be much worse than it actually was.
    The durability and longevity of carbon is going to be dependent on the impact. I think that in certain cases it will outperform Aluminum, and in certain cases it won't.
    The carbon is ridiculously strong, we've been talking about making up a little video for the website showing us doing some really stupid things to a carbon frame with a baseball bat. We've been beating on a frame at the shop lately, and it's comical how hard you can hit it with no damage.
    In the real world, as flipnidaho said, YRMV. [I actually figured out what that means!]

    Some things to note:
    The Mojo has a polyurethane clearcoat. Compared to the carbon weave underneath, or for example an anodized layer on an aluminum frame, the clear is not as durable.
    But I don't think we're talking about scratches in this thread, more likely the big hits that can ruin a frame. And this is where I think carbon can fare very well, but again YRMV.
    If there is an impact big enough to crush the cured weave, I can assure you that the same impact on an aluminum frame will also cause damage. This is where we get into an argument that no one can answer definitively, as each crash or rock impact is going to be different, and therefore it's impossible to predict which material will behave better given all the possible scenarios. I don't have any hard data for this, but it is my experience that an impact big enough to seriously damage carbon will also seriously damage aluminum. That's a big huge gross generalization, but we're talking theoreticals here.
    I have crashed so hard on my Mojo, watched it careen into a huge rock with sickening hollow sounding carbon crushing thud, that I thought for sure I'd be walking home. I was amazed that all I saw was a scratch in the clear coat (hint: touch 'em up with nail polish). That's one crash, so only one data point. I really did think I ruined the frame though as I lay on the ground and watched it peg that rock.

    Here's what we do know once that happens once either frame gets damaged.
    Carbon: You should definitely get the carbon repaired, and here's the good part, it is repairable as zrymland pointed out, quite possibly for a reasonable sum. True it won't look like new but it will be as strong as new.
    Aluminum: Generally, if an aluminum frame is damaged to the point of needing repair, you'll just throw away the triangle (or swingarm as the case may be) and get a new one. That is because to replace an aluminum tube is a pain. Then you have to heat treat the entire triangle after a new tube is welded in which is a pain. And deal with cable stops. And deal with ano or paint. So by the time you've cut out the old tube replaced it and all the weld-ons or cable stop things, heat treated again and refinished, you're probably better off buying a new triangle anyway.

    If a carbon monocoque is damaged beyond repair, like aluminum you will also need to replace the whole triangle or swingarm. Same same in this case.

    We offer a "no fault' crash replacement warranty where we will replace the frame or swingarm at a nominal charge if you 'run out of talent' in spectacular, frame-crushing fashion.

    cheers,
    Chuck Ibis

  17. #17
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    i'm liking the price tag on the ibis frameset. so now i'm trying to figger out the ideal fork for that bike. the pike coil/575 i currently own has sweet geometry all-round for the rocky trail riding i tend to do...i think the HA on the ibis mojo is 69 degrees, which is a little steeper than the yeti 575, so i'm thinking i'd want a 150 or 160 mm fork on the mojo to keep the HA slack enough for my tastes. but i don't like the high-hassle servicing on the Talas 36. and i want travel adjust. perhaps the 2007 marz AM SL1 is the ideal fork for the mojo...sub 5 lbs, travel adjust from 120 to 160 mm.

    or i could just put the 140 mm coil pike on the ibis, since i own that fork already.

    zrymland, i assume your positive review was for a 2007 160 mm travel fox 36 talas / mojo?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by frorider
    i'm liking the price tag on the ibis frameset. so now i'm trying to figger out the ideal fork for that bike. the pike coil/575 i currently own has sweet geometry all-round for the rocky trail riding i tend to do...i think the HA on the ibis mojo is 69 degrees, which is a little steeper than the yeti 575, so i'm thinking i'd want a 150 or 160 mm fork on the mojo to keep the HA slack enough for my tastes. but i don't like the high-hassle servicing on the Talas 36. and i want travel adjust. perhaps the 2007 marz AM SL1 is the ideal fork for the mojo...sub 5 lbs, travel adjust from 120 to 160 mm.

    or i could just put the 140 mm coil pike on the ibis, since i own that fork already.

    zrymland, i assume your positive review was for a 2007 160 mm travel fox 36 talas / mojo?
    My build is with the new 07 Fox Talas 32 (100 - 140 mm adjustable). At 100mm you can climb up a tree. At 140 my head angle is 69 degrees which is just fine for me and I do some pretty aggresive down hill stuff. The bike seems setup just right. It is quick and responsive yet not twitchy and holds a line beautifully even through very aggresive rock gardens and baby heads. You can see my whole build on the Ibis Mojo Build thread.

    I don't know if the Talas 36 would be too much on the Mojo or not. I would like to give it a try, but for me I like the lighter front end of the 32. Either way I think you are going to love the frame.

  19. #19
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    First off i have a 575 and an Ibis, but my Ibis is a 1984 trials bike.

    I love both of these bikes. The bigger differences are probably in the pivot location and the progression rate of the suspension that you will feel when riding the two than the visual and material differences.

    Both bikes are 6.2 lbs but the 575 with a carbon swingarm is actually lighter at 5.9 lbs. The Yeti is a bit less expensive and Yeti can get damages and repairs taken care of more quickly.

    Both are fairly tough for how light they are and can both be damaged in a crash.

    So down to the differences.
    The Ibis uses DW link suspension which has a firmer feel under pedaling than the 575. This is good and bad. If you are man enough to middle ring most climbs the Mojo's suspension gives a great quick yet active feel. For the rest of us who climb big mountains in the granny ring there is a bit of noticeable pedal feedback in a 22t ring. This makes the bike firm up and grip hard while climbing steeps. However if the climb consists of loose, rocky, stair steppy sections the pedal feedback makes for a little herky jerky sensation that can cause stalling and spitting of rocks by the rear wheel. This feel is highly personal, and some will love it and others may have issues.
    The 575's pivot location is nestled right between the 22 and 32 t rings. This offers very mild chain torque when in the granny and a hair soft in the middle ring.The chain torque is so mild that it cannot really be felt as pedal feedback but does occasionally spit out rocks. This location is a happy medium that makes many people satisfied.It may not have as ideal of a wheelpath when in the middle ring campared to the Ibis but no one comes back from a test ride with any question about pedaling over rocks.
    So why does the 575 mysteriously pedal so great if the pivot is below the 32t ring? The answer is in the shock compression ratio that has been discussed many times here on the Yeti board before.
    Where ibis chooses a little chain torque to gain quick accelaratoin Yeti chooses a unique falling- to -rising rate compression rate to get a bit of firmness at the sag point. This little bit of firmness keeps the bike from sogging down as pedal pressure is applied. When a significant bump is hit the yeti sinks into a softer part of the travel and then eventually ramps up at the end to resist bottoming. This offers the famous 575 feel that is like a 4" bike while cruising up a climb and a 6" bike when rallying faster trails.
    Both systems are great. If you are thinking the Ibis is like a Heckler type semi active ride it is not. The chain torque is mild enough that many may not even notice it. Also, since the Ibis does have a bit of chain torque they can run the shock compression rate a little softer for a smoother ride over small bumps. This i do not know for sure since i have only ridden the bike for about 10 minutes. Perhaps Mr Chuck can enlighten us even further about his little wonder bike he has crafted.

    For the moment i will stay on the 575, but the mojo could be in my future.
    Krispy
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  20. #20
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    I've been eyeing the 575 for some time now and was ready to pounce on a Team Turquoise with carbon stays when I noticed that the Ibis Mojo was only around $200 more !

    Needless to say, I've put a deposit down on the Mojo and I'm supposedly the first person in Calgary who's supposed to get it.

    This isn't to say that the 575 is completely off my mind. I'll be looking to replace my second mountain bike in the future and I'd love to have that turquoise beast sitting next to the Mojo.

  21. #21
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    zrymland

    What kind of seatpost is that?
    Nice bike....I almost got one through wrenchscience, but the wait was gonna be too long.

    BTW, that techy analysis by Krispy was great.

  22. #22
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    575 vs Mojo saga continues

    After reading all the posts here I am even more confused about which would be the better bike. The reason I a moving from my Titus switchblade is to get something that descends abit better, I don’t require a downhill machine plushness. What bike descends better , the 575 or the Ibis, from what I can gather is the Ibis climbs better, and is lighter, but at almost $300 more will there be a big enough jump in descending stability to justify the price?

    I think both are very sweet looking bikes, and since test riding is not a option i really need to rely on the info I get here.

    Thanks

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by DH_WP
    After reading all the posts here I am even more confused about which would be the better bike. The reason I a moving from my Titus switchblade is to get something that descends abit better, I don’t require a downhill machine plushness. What bike descends better , the 575 or the Ibis, from what I can gather is the Ibis climbs better, and is lighter, but at almost $300 more will there be a big enough jump in descending stability to justify the price?

    I think both are very sweet looking bikes, and since test riding is not a option i really need to rely on the info I get here.

    Thanks
    Titus made the Switchblade head angle steeper a 2 or 3 years ago, quickening steering to better match the common 4.25 inch travel used.

    If you have one of the earlier original model Switchblades before the later head angle change, the handing of the early Switchblade set up with the long rockers for 5.25 rear travel and the same fork on the Mojo would handle close to the same. I don't recall the BB height of the SB, the Mojo is probably a bit lower at 13 inches at top out with 2.1 tires making the Ibis most stable descending.

    The 575 has a slacker head angle, about 68 degrees compared to the Mojo’s and early SB’s 69 degrees with 140mm fork. The 575 has fewer size options and should be sized larger rather than smaller than your current bike if not the same for a more stable descending bike than the SB. But the Ibis is more nimble handling, which helps in maintaining stability a bit better in tight downhill transitions than both other bikes.

    The Mojo is worth much more than the 575 or SB in overall value, it is light in frame weight but also built very strong to be a more versatile bike, which can be set up as XC racer to all but the most severe Freeride and DH.

  24. #24
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    575 or Mojo?

    I owned a 575 for 1.5 years and now own a Mojo. Overall, I like the Mojo much more. For descending the Mojo feels more plush. I know this is hard to believe since the 575 is already pretty plush. I think the DW link works substantially better on square-edged hits and the Mojo has more of a bottomless sensation.

    There is no doubt that the Mojo exhibits far less pedal-induced bob as the DW link is truly amazing in this department. I've owned 15 full-suspension bikes since the early 1990s and this design is a very noticeable improvement over everything else that I've ever tried.

    We will see about the carbon durability in the long run. I have owned a full-suspension carbon race bike (Giant NRS) and had no issues with the carbon in that case. I believe the carbon fiber and more specifically the Mojo lay-up/design make this bike exceptionally stiff laterally. I think the Mojo frame actually steers much better than the 575 and is way less flexy. This is one feature that has really surprised me. I notice much less deflection going through rock gardens and very bumpy section. I also think that the carbon fiber does take-out some of the very small bump buzz, similar to what you experience on a good carbon road bike.

    Don't get me wrong, I think the Yeti 575 is an excellent bike, but I do think the Mojo is superior in just about every way. I do feel more in control in very dicey situations on the Mojo. The only advantage to the 575 is that you can find them used and fairly cheap. However, considering the quality offered in the Mojo, it is a real bargain for the price. Also, the Ibis customer service is fantastic! I hope this helps your decision.

  25. #25
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    Thanks, I have never ridden a 575, so cant really comment on the plushness, but people have been raving about it, if this is better then my mind is made up, think I will wait the extra 2 months and get the Mojo then....

  26. #26
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    Sorry for hijacking this thread but I am also interested in hearing experiences with Yeti 575 and Ibis Mojo.

    I have a Yeti 575/Pike which I have been riding since 2005 and I have been very satisfied with it but I would like to try some other designs since the 575 was my first FS and I have also been tempted by the Ibis Mojo. I find the 575 very plush, a great climber when seated and if you are standing the PP should be turned on to eliminate bobbing - in many ways the Yeit 575 really is an excellent bike. I like that I feels like you are sitting in the center of the bike - you can quicky get behind and in front of the frame. I have raced it and found myself being faster than other guys on XC-frames. Some things about the Yeti 575 which irritate me is that I think that I am placed high on the frame because of the tall BB - not that it is any lower than any other AM frames but when going slow speed and turning corners it would be nice with a lower BB. Another thing is when standing up I can feel a significant amount of bob. I sometimes feel a little bit of flex but it is rare.

    I have seen that the BB height on the Ibis Mojo (13.2) is lower than the Yeti 575 (13.75). Is that you because you use lower sag or is it because of the DW-design or is there another reason for this? I assume this makes the Ibis Mojo more raceworthy than the Yeti 575. I don´t do any jumps taller than 2 feet and I would like something a bit faster than the Yeti – what are your experiences with the frames?

  27. #27
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    Mojo vs 575

    I think that the lower bottom bracket on the Mojo does help the steering some. Ibis really nailed the geometry on the Mojo and it steers very telepathically. However, I run a Talas on the Mojo and I like to experiment with fork heights and steering angles on different terrain. I do sometimes hit my pedals on rocks when riding the Mojo and I almost never did on my 575.

    I certainly think you can build the Mojo light enough to race it cross-country occasionally. I think my large Mojo frame weighs about 5.8 lbs, although I have never weighed it myself. However if you were really serious about racing I might seek something a little lighter and tighter. The Mojo is truly an a trailbike but it has a really wide sweetspot.

  28. #28
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    575 Vs Mojo

    Quote Originally Posted by jboysen
    Anybody have the opportunity to ride the new carbon mojo? Geometry looks pretty similar to a 575, travel is pretty close and it uses the same RP23 that on the 575s now, as well as specing a 140mm fork which it seems is ideal for the 575. Just curious to hear if anybody has personal experience on both and what kind of comparisons can be drawn between the two bikes.
    Hey Boysen

    I have owned both and just recently purchased another Ibis. In my opinion the Ibis is a much better bike. It climbs alot better and it goes down just as well. As for the carbon issue on the Ibis I had the same fear as most. But after riding a 4" S-works epic on the trails I ride I now have no problems with carbon on a mountain bike. Plus my Ibis weighs in at 25 1/4 lbs and I built it to be an all day trail bike. If I were you I would go with the Mojo in a heartbeat you will love it without a doubt.

  29. #29
    The Crow
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    So what the hell does YRMV means????

  30. #30
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    Your Results May Vary

  31. #31
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    Aaaahhh!!! Was wrecking my brains here!

  32. #32
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    Yeti Riders May Vomit - after finding out they could have gotten a Mojo for a little more.

    Just kidding, the 575 seems like a good bike as well.

  33. #33
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    I have one of each, like them both. The 575 is (to my backside) plusher and easier to ride all day every day, the Mojo wants to constantly 'go faster' and beats you up a little more accordingly.

    They are both great bikes, if I had to pick one only, I'd go Mojo and soften it off

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    What about the new 08 575, 30% stiffer they say. I spoke with my LBS and one of the guys has been riding a new 575 and says it is way better than the old models. That would be a whole new comparison then with the Mojo I would think.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by hd92fxrp
    What about the new 08 575, 30% stiffer they say. I spoke with my LBS and one of the guys has been riding a new 575 and says it is way better than the old models. That would be a whole new comparison then with the Mojo I would think.
    The new 575 looks way better, more sculpted in metalwork now than the prior basic tube "erector set" styling. And it's one of the best bikes for all around trail riding.

    The Mojo is still the best trail bike ever. Looks are subjective, but it sure is getting an increasing number of complements as I ride by.

  36. #36
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    Could it be that you are biased because you own a Mojo or have you actually tried out the new 08 575 and compared the two bikes? I am just looking into getting one or the other and trying I am to get info. Thanks

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by hd92fxrp
    Could it be that you are biased because you own a Mojo or have you actually tried out the new 08 575 and compared the two bikes? I am just looking into getting one or the other and trying I am to get info. Thanks
    I've ridden the earlier 575, the new version has the same suspension design. The DW link is so much better than the 575, more bump active all the time and with less pedaling bob for quicker acceleration and easier climbing on either smooth or rough trail. Increased rear end stiffness of the newer won't change pedaling efficiency that much, only really improve pedaling response and handling in rough terrain.

    I found the early 575 steering a bit too slack and floppy feeling for tighter line trail riding, but if you often ride shuttle bikes with very slack long travel forks the 575 may feel better than the Mojo's more all around trail balance.

    I really like the 575, and put it in the top 10 of all around trail bikes that can climb very well. The Mojo is #1 to me no matter the price. I tested many mid travel bikes for a few years before buying the Mojo to replace my very versatile Intense Tracer.

    But I must do medium to longer climbs a lot where I live, and the Mojo’s low weight matters. If I had only shorter climbs there are other bikes that I’d consider. The IronHorse 6 Point would be my bike if I weren’t climbing so much. I rode one recently for the first time at the Interbike Dirt Demo where there wasn’t much climbing and the heavier weight is not noticeable it works so well. And with slightly more measurable travel than the 575 it feels like 2 inches more and pedals better. And the 6Point has about the same slacker steering trail bike feel as the 575.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    I've ridden the earlier 575, the new version has the same suspension design. The DW link is so much better than the 575, more bump active all the time and with less pedaling bob for quicker acceleration and easier climbing on either smooth or rough trail. Increased rear end stiffness of the newer won't change pedaling efficiency that much, only really improve pedaling response and handling in rough terrain.

    I found the early 575 steering a bit too slack and floppy feeling for tighter line trail riding, but if you often ride shuttle bikes with very slack long travel forks the 575 may feel better than the Mojo's more all around trail balance.

    I really like the 575, and put it in the top 10 of all around trail bikes that can climb very well. The Mojo is #1 to me no matter the price. I tested many mid travel bikes for a few years before buying the Mojo to replace my very versatile Intense Tracer.

    But I must do medium to longer climbs a lot where I live, and the Mojo’s low weight matters. If I had only shorter climbs there are other bikes that I’d consider. The IronHorse 6 Point would be my bike if I weren’t climbing so much. I rode one recently for the first time at the Interbike Dirt Demo where there wasn’t much climbing and the heavier weight is not noticeable it works so well. And with slightly more measurable travel than the 575 it feels like 2 inches more and pedals better. And the 6Point has about the same slacker steering trail bike feel as the 575.
    I haven't ridden a Mojo (yet) but have owned a L 575 with DUC32's built up to about 27.5lb.
    I've ridden the 575 over everything including some pretty rough techo stuff. I've also raced
    it in numerous XC events.

    Before the 575 I owned a Craftworks FRM125 which has a well designed 4 bar rear end.

    The 575 is a VG all round bike but there are definitely a few weaknesses or compromises.
    It has an initially falling shock ratio which makes the rear end initially stiff. This helps
    pedalling efficiency but it works against you in other ways. Going down fast small rock
    infested steep descents, the rear end tends to skip around a lot unless you really keep it
    weighted. The rear end flex also comes into play here.

    Going back up those same descents, small/med rocky steep and slippery can be quite a
    chore. The pedal forces aren't well enough isolated from rear end action and it can really
    chew your power when you are making up for this. I realised this when I rode a Giant
    maestro rear end bike up same ascents and it was much smoother.

    The only other area wanting is acceleration, but I felt this most when doing XC events
    and you are against 3" to 4" travel lightweight XC rocketships, so for it's travel it is pretty
    good.

    I've pretty much made up my mind to get a Mojo as it -appears- to address all these
    areas. It should make a better XC race bike but still be good for trail riding.... unless
    something better comes along. The Trance-X is also looking nice at a better price.

    cheers

    TCD

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    Awesome feedback! thanks!

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    This is a great thread and I wish we could post it over at the Yeti forum. Both are great bikes and I own a 06 575. My next bike will also be either a Ibis or Yeti.

    The 575 shines when seated and climbing. It is rock hard "when seated" and for a front range colorado bike it is amazing. It descend great also, even though I get the rare push sensation from the front wheel on fast, real technical twisty singletrack. This is where the compromise is, standing up in low gears. I get massive pedal bob and I skid out on real techincal steep sections. Its hard to compare colorado terrain to other places, so this might be the place where I ride. I can't wait to test the new 08 575. If it performs like people are saying, its going be hard to pass up. If Yeti didn't release this bike, the Mojo was looking pretty darn sweet..

    Erik

  41. #41
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    I think Sean ZZSEAN would agree that the Mojo is a great Colorado bike. I ride pretty much full time in Colorado and its a great bike. An awesome climber bar none. It sticks like glue going up and down. The DWLink is the best suspension I have ever tried and I have tried most all of the ones on the market.

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    All the Mojo riders talk about the DW suspension, I know that this question goes in another direction, but what about the Ironhorse bikes like the 6 point 6 or the MK111 with the DW suspension? Are they worth considering?

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    I have ridden the Iron Horse MKIII and found it to be very close in ride to the Mojo. Its missing that little extra something that the Mojo has but otherwise is a pretty darn good bike. As you ride up and down, especially down if you didn't know what bike your on you'd sometimes think it was a Mojo. Of course in a A vs B comparison the Mojo still has the magic.

    Another DWLink bike I have ridden is the Pivot Cycles Mach 5 and I pretty much disliked it. Not sure what it is about the bike but it was one of those let me get this back to them cause this demo sucks type of ride.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by pastajet
    I think Sean ZZSEAN would agree that the Mojo is a great Colorado bike. I ride pretty much full time in Colorado and its a great bike. An awesome climber bar none. It sticks like glue going up and down. The DWLink is the best suspension I have ever tried and I have tried most all of the ones on the market.
    I can't comment about the 575 as I have never even test ridden one. They certainly are popular in Colorado.

    I had it in my choose a bike list when I was shopping but dismissed it primarly because of asthetic reasons - I just couldn't get over the knuckle and how terrible it looked, that and the fact that it seemed like every 3rd rider in colorado was riding a yeti meant I didn't even bother to test ride. The new 575 design definitely looks much better and had it been the bike to choose from 12 months ago I may well have actually taken it for a test ride.

    The mojo on the other hand not only looks amazing but seems so perfectly suited to the riding in Colorado it is scary. Check my blog for a decent sample of the sort of riding I have done with my Mojo for the past 12 months of ownership.

    I am also really psyched now that the desert season is here and I can start pushing myself technically even more with my mojo out there. For example I have done porcupine rim (with LPS) twice in the past 3 weeks and each time I keep thinking to myself how freaking awesome my bike is for that sort of riding. I wasn't sure this past weekend how I would feel as I threw only my Fox RP23 for the weekend as my Coil shock is with Push and even with the light air shock the bike just absolutely pinned it on the rocky fast stuff before the single track.

  45. #45
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    Go for the 575 08. Buy the lightest components you can as all that travel cushions them far better than a hard tail would. Set the RP23 to 3 with max rebound and it'll ride just like the hard tail only you wont notice the bumps. Then when you get to the down hills just grin ear to ear, mind the slack head angle though it can understeer badly on tight berms. Having said that you will enjoy riding more than ever.
    P.S. My 575 frame is for sale as I now want a Mojo SL...

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    Being born in Denver Colorado I am very partial to a bike company based in Golden. I love the new 575 my buddy has. (You see about a billion of them in Jeffco open space, if it is that good I had to give it a try.) IMHO (of course and also Jim's as he owns the bike.) The Moj blows the doors off it for rocky colorado single track. Smoother out of saddle on climbs and descends better with a really plush suspension without any lil seat stay gimicks of the Yeti. Feels lighter I suspect because of the way carbon front triangle to me seems to ramp up your energy by transmitting to the drivetrain and not thru-out the frame. At the same time on the other end of the bike not transmitting trail vibration to your bod. The Yeti reminded me somewhat of the Fuel 9.5 ex 2007 pre-abp with the shock on max pro-pedal. Maybe similar seat stay "pivots".
    I think you would be best served if you do the rent to buy Ibis program where you can rent one and if you decide to buy, the $ goes to the purchase. Funny, I did that so much I ran up significant denero cause I could not let it go back to shop. The bike has so much hype because of it's looks I thought it was hard to live up to that. Note: I'm a xcountry/marathon type and did not think I could get such a bike to perform at an xc level. I was wrong. So, I will leave the tech compairisons to the experts, but at least try the Moj. before you jump to a 575.
    (If I wind up buying a 575 in addition to Moj down the road it is because of sentiment and I need a good backup bike, nothing wrong with that ethier to support the home team. The 575 is a fine bike and every rider should test ride and test ride somemore. Please don't decide on a bike based on silly forum postes. If you posted on Yeti forum you would have opposite reaction. The ride experience on every bike: Fit, angles, suspension system, frame material, and a mirade of other factors is a proprietary personal experience. Remember one huge thing Ibis and a few other manufacturers do is the demo rent to own program. If you go to a participating bike shop and rent a demo bike, the rental fee applies to your purchase. On the trail is the only right way to decide on a new mountain bike, but it sure is fun shopping. )
    Last edited by ghawk; 06-15-2008 at 02:42 AM.

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    I currently run an 06 575 and recently demo'd back to back a 08 575, a Mojo and a Blur LT (Old model). The 575 and Mojo were quite similar but the mud clearence (very sticky British mud) on the Yeti was rubbish - the bridge between the seatstays clogged and the 575 was the only bike out of the 3 that I had to stop and unclog. As I'm a UK rider mud clearence is important! My 06 575 doesn't clog so it was a shame that the new one does. If it'd been a dry day it would have been a very close call between the Ibis and Yeti, I was also amazed at how much stiffer the new 575 is compared to mine. I didn't like the feel of the Blur, but understand the new version is better, so I'm buying a Mojo.

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    Smile

    I have a 08 575 and a Mojo. if you are doing more back country stuff with logs, big rocks
    the 575 is a little nicer with a taller bb height. For everything else, the Mojo excels.
    both bikes have the same forks and wheels for comparison.
    just my 2 cents worth.
    Mitch
    Boise

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbmitch2
    I have a 08 575 and a Mojo. if you are doing more back country stuff with logs, big rocks
    the 575 is a little nicer with a taller bb height. For everything else, the Mojo excels.
    both bikes have the same forks and wheels for comparison.
    just my 2 cents worth.
    Mitch
    Boise
    Good point re. BB height Mitch - i run a Fox 32 Talas on my 575 and find the BB a touch low on it, even with the fork at 140. I have read that a Mojo should be run with less sag than a normal full sus bike - any thoughts on this guys?

  50. #50
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    Spot and Mojo

    This season should be fun....Mojo is right at 27.15 lbs and the Spot is 29 now....was 30.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  51. #51
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    Newer 575

    Just to update this thread to 2010, I have an 05 Yeti 575, all aluminum and I recently rode the 09 carbon. Major stiffness improvement!! The familiar rock garden wobble was gone. I still have the 05 and am considering building on the new frame, or the Mojo SL

    I have been considering Mojo and I am reading all this good news except the bb height. The bb on my Yeti is too low. Lots of rock bashing in the deep stuff. So if the Mojo is lower???

    I guess it boils down to where you ride. Here in Idaho, most trails are steep yet smooth so Mojo sounds like the choice. For technical rock and root trails like Fruita or East and West coast, maybe the Yeti is the choice over the Ibis.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by FPTRU
    Just to update this thread to 2010, I have an 05 Yeti 575, all aluminum and I recently rode the 09 carbon. Major stiffness improvement!! The familiar rock garden wobble was gone. I still have the 05 and am considering building on the new frame, or the Mojo SL

    I have been considering Mojo and I am reading all this good news except the bb height. The bb on my Yeti is too low. Lots of rock bashing in the deep stuff. So if the Mojo is lower???

    I guess it boils down to where you ride. Here in Idaho, most trails are steep yet smooth so Mojo sounds like the choice. For technical rock and root trails like Fruita or East and West coast, maybe the Yeti is the choice over the Ibis.
    I have ridden my Mojo in Colorado and Eastern Utah for the past 3 years. I have never had issues with rock strikes out here. I did up in British Colombia on their crazy roots at times, but not down here. The only time I even notice the low BB is when I am pedaling up and through rocks and I have to time my pedal strokes to avoid obstacles.

    I love the low BB of the Mojo and my other bike (DH) has an even lower BB and has to hit rock gardens at even higher speeds (but only in a downward direction).

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by FPTRU
    Just to update this thread to 2010, I have an 05 Yeti 575, all aluminum and I recently rode the 09 carbon. Major stiffness improvement!! The familiar rock garden wobble was gone. I still have the 05 and am considering building on the new frame, or the Mojo SL

    I have been considering Mojo and I am reading all this good news except the bb height. The bb on my Yeti is too low. Lots of rock bashing in the deep stuff. So if the Mojo is lower???

    I guess it boils down to where you ride. Here in Idaho, most trails are steep yet smooth so Mojo sounds like the choice. For technical rock and root trails like Fruita or East and West coast, maybe the Yeti is the choice over the Ibis.
    With a 150mm fork, I get fewer rock strikes (compared to a 140mm fork). Taller tires helped as well.

    I was not pleased with how the 2009 575 rode, though I put a higher premium on climbing and pedaling performance than most.

    -D

  54. #54
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    The DWL and the newer multi-link bikes will be better climbers and will pedal more efficiently. That is pretty inherent in their design...they are all designed pretty well. The 575 did climb pretty well back in its day but that day has gone and it was all relative. I liked the ASR and 575 a lot back in the mid-2000s. There are better choices now and Yeti had done nothing with those designs but sat back and redesigned the frames a bit and added the carbon in. Sorry but the suspension design is really dated and feels sluggish in comparison to so many others. The Yeti guys climb well but they also are strong riders and put way more pressure in the shocks, so as to almost run them hardtail-like so they can stand and climb.

    Quote Originally Posted by Diesel~
    With a 150mm fork, I get fewer rock strikes (compared to a 140mm fork). Taller tires helped as well.

    I was not pleased with how the 2009 575 rode, though I put a higher premium on climbing and pedaling performance than most.

    -D

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diesel~
    With a 150mm fork, I get fewer rock strikes (compared to a 140mm fork). Taller tires helped as well.

    I was not pleased with how the 2009 575 rode, though I put a higher premium on climbing and pedaling performance than most.

    -D
    Good point. I should have prefaced my response with the fact that I run a 160mm Coil Lyrik as my fork on my Mojo.

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