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  1. #1
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    New question here. When is it time to replace the linkage/bearings?

    I've done 1200kms on my Mojo (in dry conditions) already and wondered when I should starting thinking about replacing the linkages. I did notice a little flex in the rear when I grabbed the rear wheel - I can actually see the distance between the seat-stay and the seat-tube change very slightly. Of course this may have always been this way (I just never looked), or it might it be an indication of something else (eg bearings wearing).

    So does anyone know if there is an easy way to tell when to replace the linkages & bearings? Perhaps I'm just looking for an excuse to buy different coloured linkages

  2. #2
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    best engineered on the Market

    Quote Originally Posted by jacko69

    So does anyone know if there is an easy way to tell when to replace the linkages & bearings? Perhaps I'm just looking for an excuse to buy different coloured linkages
    Probably, I am looking for the blue ones myself Bearings can last many years. The bearings of my GT STS are 11 years old and still running very fine (granted I have not used the bike much in the last 4 years), different thing but my TNT bottom bracket is still working fine after 10.

    I put on about 2,000 miles on my Mojo in a year and there is no sign of wear, maybe check the bolts if you think there is a bit of slack ... or buy the nice colored links ... they are very cheap and they the smartest and best engineered system on the market by miles: allowing to change bearings with just 1 allen key

  3. #3
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    On most of the full suspension bikes I've owned in the last 11 years the main bearings near the BB wear out first and begin to show noticeable free side play at the bearings in 1 to 1.5 years riding about 3000 miles a year about 1/4 of the time in wet conditions.

    I haven't seen any play in the Mojo bearings yet in over 1.5 years and two wet winters, but I'm riding a less distance these days due to less time off work than the past.

  4. #4
    It's the axle
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    I also have about 2000 miles in the last year, and in wet conditions.

    One way to discover bearing condition is to pull the linkages and examine the bearings for rough action or play. Pulling the wheel from side to side is one way. But that flex is the result of a multiple of things. The most telling is to simply feel the bearings by hand.

  5. #5
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    New question here.

    Quote Originally Posted by jacko69
    I did notice a little flex in the rear when I grabbed the rear wheel - I can actually see the distance between the seat-stay and the seat-tube change very slightly. Of course this may have always been this way (I just never looked), or it might it be an indication of something else (eg bearings wearing).
    Does anyone/everyone else get a little flex in the rear using this method, ie by grab the seat-tube & then the rear-wheel and seeing the distance from the seat-stay to the seat-tube change by perhaps 1mm (the gap is only a few mm anyway)?
    I'm not really worried, just curious.

  6. #6
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    I had about 700 miles (maybe) on mine before they needed replacing. Pulled my mojo apart for some cleaning and noticed the rough action. Lucky its easy to replace them, just not that free... Though not entirely expensive, even though you're replacing the whole linkage- by comparison my old stumpy FSR cost me around $140 by the time I paid for the bearing kit and the shop time.... Apparently the Specialized specialized tool to do the job properly cost almost as much as the bike did.
    **** censorship

  7. #7
    oiz
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    headset

    I hope this is not too off topic, mind you it is a bearing question. Are you happy with the stock Cane Creek headset or is there a better alternative. I will be building from scratch so I have a choice. Thanks everyone.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacko69
    Does anyone/everyone else get a little flex in the rear using this method, ie by grab the seat-tube & then the rear-wheel and seeing the distance from the seat-stay to the seat-tube change by perhaps 1mm (the gap is only a few mm anyway)?
    I'm not really worried, just curious.
    Yes, its normal. There's plenty of clearance and not any more flex whenever there is such side load on the rear than many designs I've ridden and owned previously. It could have been designed with less flex using bigger parts. Maybe durable weight savings was a bigger design goal. Virtually anyone who has ridden the Mojo says that this dw-link suspension design rides very easily.

  9. #9
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    There is some interesting info here. Frame Flex on Mojo or Mojo SL
    It would be nice if someone could compare a New Mojo vs a NEW Mojo SL to compare the amount of flex?

  10. #10
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    On my previous 2 fullies (Spec Epic and Stumpy) in contrast what Derby has posted upper link bearings wear first. In average I needed to replace them every 2 years (= ca. 6000 - 7000 km) regardless of what type of bearings I've used (brand SKF or much cheaper 2RS sealed "noname"). To be honest, I've replaced bearings when they stopped move smoothly and have had ripple feeling if rotated by finger or with unjoined link or stays. The best time to check the bearings is when rear shock needs maintenance (i.e. every 50hrs. according to Fox manual )

  11. #11
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    My lower pivot bearings were feeling digitized after six months from new. Real easy to replace.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarsellone
    There is some interesting info here. Frame Flex on Mojo or Mojo SL
    It would be nice if someone could compare a New Mojo vs a NEW Mojo SL to compare the amount of flex?
    Hans mentioned some time ago the Super High Modulus type carbon fiber was about 10% stiffer.

    The Mojo flex is partly due to the bike being light weight carbon fiber. I think CF applications being somewhat stiffer with the same part dimension but much more durable than aluminum, so the CF parts are designed lighter in weight while maintaining better durability but flex increase is the tradeoff. The rest is similar causes of difference in flex from any bike to bike, partly from the geometry of the swingarm and partly from the size of the parts (links, pivots, swingarm tubes, seat tube, rear axle, etc.).

    Typically lighter bikes are flexier than heavier bikes; the Mojo is no exception. There is no other bike as light with as much travel and durability. If you want a stiffer bike you will have to find a bike with much less travel for the same weight and durability, or less durability with the same weight and travel, or at least 2 pounds heavier in weight for the same travel and durability.

    The Mojo's weight, durability, and flex seems very well balanced for a very high quality ride and reliability.

    Big jump riders should probably look for a much heavier stiffer bike for somewhat increased control of big hit landings. Hard cornering downhill riders should probably find a stiffer shorter travel bike of the same weight with steeper fork angles. The Mojo is a more versatile all around trail bike that may miss being the best at the extremes of use but more than makes up in quality high performance for 98% of most rider’s uses.

  13. #13
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    My bearings were shot after 3 months of riding..... No not really.. I just wanted the blue ones so told my wife that...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarsellone
    There is some interesting info here. Frame Flex on Mojo or Mojo SL
    It would be nice if someone could compare a New Mojo vs a NEW Mojo SL to compare the amount of flex?
    As I enjoy saying NOBODY can measure or compare the "flex" of bike without using instruments (see photos below, from http://www.liteville.com/ ). Most of the talk about flex is just coffee talk, fun but fairly useless. To top it all "flex" is a fairly meaningless notion when applied to riding, if anything you would want to measure reflex of a frame. The carbon used in the SL is "high modulus carbon fiber" according to the IBIS web site. Of course we do not know which one high modulus, nor how a higher modulus translates into frame numbers. So ... you want to save 150 grams? I would have just for the fun of it .. still I am very happy with the regular Mojo and I can carry an extra 150
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  15. #15
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    moved

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    Frameskin™ Bike Protection Film
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  16. #16
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    removing the bottom links

    Quote Originally Posted by mojojoe
    My lower pivot bearings were feeling digitized after six months from new. Real easy to replace.
    i know i'm technically retarded, but seriously i cannot loosen the lower pivot bearings (the ones with the plastic caps). i have the allen wrenches on the drive and non-drive side, and have put tons of weight on it to loosen and it wont budge. any tips?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide
    As I enjoy saying NOBODY can measure or compare the "flex" of bike without using instruments (see photos below, from http://www.liteville.com/ ). Most of the talk about flex is just coffee talk, fun but fairly useless. To top it all "flex" is a fairly meaningless notion when applied to riding, if anything you would want to measure reflex of a frame. The carbon used in the SL is "high modulus carbon fiber" according to the IBIS web site. Of course we do not know which one high modulus, nor how a higher modulus translates into frame numbers. So ... you want to save 150 grams? I would have just for the fun of it .. still I am very happy with the regular Mojo and I can carry an extra 150
    Tangent or continued hijack: imho as always
    The ole flex Pandora's box. Anyone remember the tarantula ?
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...20#post3665320
    SL ~37% uhm (In the carbon industry uhm carbon is some neat stuff .) the uhm carbon fiber about equally distributed between the front and the back triangles brings sl to about 5% stiffer in Ibis's deflection test I was told. http://www.netcomposites.com/education.asp?sequence=35
    The sl is more than just the uhm carbon and a few grams.
    - paint ? $$$ expensive to do for the upcharge on the bike, compaired to what other manufacturer's are charging for comparable carbon frames with classic clearcoat or paint (notoriously hard to get paint to stick on carbon and hold up over a few years) Also, with the pu paint, look at the problem Ibis is having with the browns and grays that's $ in this new technology)
    Not to mention carbon seat tube insert (no more issues with galvanization that the alums had in the moj classic.)
    No doubt the sl is worth it, except the wait time on the colors ........at this point, i have nothing better to do than wish i had one.
    Last edited by ghawk; 04-12-2008 at 01:29 PM. Reason: cause I'm a nut

  18. #18
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    For me it was 6 months. Found out while taking off the rear triangle, as I poked a hole in it. Remember cabon hitting pointed rocks is not Good times. At the same time found the lower link was rubbing the bottom of the triangle. The Ibis guys said that was the reason for the bearings going, the rear link was apparently not up to snuff. At any rate they gave me a new set of red links, I had to pay $250.00 for the rear triangle. the hole was about 4mm sq and did not go all the way through but was well into the underlying layers

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by SMT42
    For me it was 6 months. Found out while taking off the rear triangle, as I poked a hole in it. Remember cabon hitting pointed rocks is not Good times. At the same time found the lower link was rubbing the bottom of the triangle. The Ibis guys said that was the reason for the bearings going, the rear link was apparently not up to snuff. At any rate they gave me a new set of red links, I had to pay $250.00 for the rear triangle. the hole was about 4mm sq and did not go all the way through but was well into the underlying layers
    Sorry to hear about the hole in the swingarm. And I hope you survived the impact better.

    I haven't yet seen or felt any slop or play in the bearings after 1.75 years on my Mojo and about 4,500 miles. I'm 200 lbs and usually wear out moving or rotating components in 1 or 2 years. I just bought a complete link/bearing set and plan to replace them soon as preventative maintenance to avoid any second "half-life" deteariation in precision. The Mojo is so well refined it deserves the greatest precision in every component.

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