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  1. #1
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    Stem size for my Mojo

    Hey all,

    I'm not sure where to post this, so I figure I'd start here.

    I've got an XL Mojo, and I'm just over 6'1".
    When I first bought the bike I had it fitted and they put on the 120mm stem. I rode it for a few months and then upgraded the stem to a Thomson 100mm. I enjoyed the control of the shorter stem.

    About a year ago I had my road bike and Mojo professionally fitted by "one of the best". He changed my stem back to the 120mm. I've been riding it this way ever since, but I know I preferred it with the shorter stem.

    Just wanted to get some feedback on if I should switch back, and if there will be any major effect on the overall fitting and comfort of the bike.

    Thoughts???

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    You 100% answered your own question. Only thing to check is, throw a 120 on and hit the trails. You'll know whats right, better than the fit guys. IMO the fit guys will get you most of the way there, and maybe even right on the mark, but your body will tell you the final little tweaks, if you listen to it.

  3. #3
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    Consider a wider bar also when going to a shorter stem, and changing stem height spacers or bar rise to be a little lower in front to keep your reach and forward lean similar to using the longer stem and current bar.

    Wider bars + shorter stem + lower bar height = no loss in seated pedaling and climbing, and much better corner handling and downhill, increased stability, and more powerful standing while climbing, accelerating, or stepping up rocks and logs. The only downside is slightly more wind resistance which is a non-issue off road except windy race days.

  4. #4
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    I'm the same size as you and run a 70mm, it handles way better than the 90 I had on before.

    Do what derby says:
    wider bars (710mm)
    lower bar height
    and throw on a 70mm stem.

    I did those three things and will never go back.

    Also "one of the best" isn't you on your bike.
    Those who know, ride a Mojo AND a Mojo HD.
    Quadzilla
    Quote Originally Posted by benja55
    Ok, whatever, cold water on my bike boner right there.

  5. #5
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    I'm 6'2" on an XL with a 50mm stem and low rise wide bars. Anything longer than 70mm and I feel pretty sketchy on steeper rockier stuff. But that's me and how I like my bike to fit, so it all comes down to what you're comfortable with.
    Did the person who fit you consider the type of riding you will be doing?

  6. #6
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    Sounds like your fitter may be more of a roadie/ XC racer. If that's the kind of riding you do then fine, but I'd experiment with shorter stems.

  7. #7
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    Definitely try a way shorter stem.

  8. #8
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    I'm running a 710mm Race Face carbon with a 70x0 stem and love it. Love it.

  9. #9
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    i'm 6'1" + and ride a large SL currently with a 110 stem. After reading some other posts and giving it more thought, I'm switching to a 90. I used to ride shorter stems when I was more of a free rider and i remember much more stable handling/descending characteristics.

    Unless you are an XC racer, your fitter made a poor choice by recommending a 120. In general, bike fitting on mtb's like the mojo are destined to be flawed. unless the fitter is out there, riding with you, seeing your terrain and riding style they will not be able to account for how you shift around on the bike. A road bike is a lot different in that you are not moving around, shifting your body weight, anywhere near as much. You also are unlikely to encounter the type of technical terrain that would warrant a short stem and wide bar on a road bike.

    You should just ask for your money back on the mtb fit and use it to buy the shorter stem and wider bar.

  10. #10
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    Thanks everyone for the replies!
    I went ahead and threw the shorter (100mm) stem back on last night and rode her this morning. What a difference. Felt so much better on anything slightly technical. Plus I was comfortable the whole time.
    I definitely will experiment with something even shorter. Sounds like I should go somewhere in the 70mm range from all the responses.
    I've already got the wider carbon bar. Easton Monkeylite XC 685mm. Might look into the 710mm bar at some point.

    Thanks again!

  11. #11
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    Ended up throwing a 65mm Easton Havoc stem on there. (it was on sale at Jenson for $29) Probably a little on the heavy side, but it was the right price.
    After one short ride; so far so good!

  12. #12
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    stem length is about fit not handling. It baffles my mind why people on 5"+ bikes don't understand this. yes different length stems handle different but the stem is only one part in this equation. If you like a bike that handles well with a super short stem search out a bike with a longer top tube so your body is in the right spot but your bike still "feels right". Seems kind of ironic that you paid "one of the best" fitters a couple hundred bucks no doubt to fit you on your bike and then completely disregarded what he told you and then found a cheap ass stem on line.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by customfab
    stem length is about fit not handling. It baffles my mind why people on 5"+ bikes don't understand this. yes different length stems handle different but the stem is only one part in this equation. If you like a bike that handles well with a super short stem search out a bike with a longer top tube so your body is in the right spot but your bike still "feels right". Seems kind of ironic that you paid "one of the best" fitters a couple hundred bucks no doubt to fit you on your bike and then completely disregarded what he told you and then found a cheap ass stem on line.
    \

    He's only 6'1"" on a XL, I mean you have a point about the TT length etc, but unless this guy is some sort of freak, I can't see anyone that tall needing a 120mm stem on a XL mojo for the correct fit, let alone how shitty the bike will handle with that long stem Its not a road bike I doubt he'll be pedaling in the saddle for 4-6 hours, a shorter stem will handle way better and still be relatively comfortable.

    FYI I'm 6'2"" on a XL with a 70mm stem and 28" bars, no spacers under no rise stem and 1.5" riser bars with a 150mm fork

  14. #14
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    Agree with Yody. Fitting experts tend to be (but not always) road focused. You can't apply the same rules to a mountainbike. See bikejames.com and leelikesbikes.com. They both have had great pieces on mtb fit.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by customfab
    stem length is about fit not handling.
    On a roadie yes.

    On an XC hardtail, yes to an extent.

    On a Mojo, not really.

    Your position is a lot more dynamic on an MTB, especially a trail focused 5"+ bike.

    Stem length has two main properties:

    1. Fit or posture on the bike. Very important on a roadie, where you may be in much the same position for hours on end. Not so important on a trail bike, because you move around a lot, jumping, turning, etc.

    2. Quickness of the steering. Long stem has a "tiller effect" which deadens the steering.
    Quick steering is Important on a MTB, esp for technical riding. On a roadie, steering inputs are small and less frequent. Whereas bombing through a rockgarden on a mojo you need to flick it around. This is why DH bikes have such short stems.


    I agree with the other poster that said the Bike "fitter" was roadie focused.

  16. #16
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    Customfab, I have heard the exact opposite regarding stems. Infact a couple of mtb specific skill coaches state that stem length is all about handling and getting the centre of gravity in the right place and should not be used to address fit. Unfortunately this road based fit belief has been embedded in the mountain bike world due to there being no other view for such a long time. It's funny the eureka moment some XC riders experience when you loan them a shorter stem.

  17. #17
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    IIRC tom at ibis who is pushing 6'6" rides the XL with a 120 and he picked the geometry of that bike. rides just fine. It's all about body proportions he may only be 6'1" but if he is all arms he may need a longer stem. Of course something that is short is going ot feel OK most people like being upright but there is a reason the fitter put him their.

  18. #18
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    I always suspected the ibis guys were roadies lol, so is that who we can blame for the ghey short top tube on both the mojo and hd??

  19. #19
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    I personally think it does come down to handling on a mtn bike. I ride a road bike as well (when I'm feeling ghey), and I haven't changed any of the settings from that fitting.
    I didn't pay all that money to buy one of the best handling mtn bikes, and then have it fitted to decrease its handling capability on descents.
    The fitting process was explained to me as follows. First they get your bottom half set up correctly (the motor). This is obviously the more important part, since it gives you greater efficiency and power, and will also reduce the likelihood of any pains. Then comes the upper body (the controls). Certainly this is important as well, but if I decided to shorten the stem, and I'm still comfortable and able to climb efficiently, then what's the big deal?
    I definitely feel a huge difference on anything slightly technical going down. The 120mm stem felt much slower to react. The front end came alive with the 65mm stem. At first it felt a bit twitchy, but the more I ride it, the better it gets. I'm sure my senses will soon adapt, and it will soon feel normal.
    Also, I spent a lot of money on the bike fitments because I was beginning to experience random pains in my body. It has made the biggest difference on my road bike. Mtn bikes are a whole lot more comfortable to begin with, but I figured I might as well have it fit since I was already going. I bought the stem on sale because I would rather spend $29 on a mistake than spend $100 on a Thomson. The stem is quite nice. Probably the best $29 I've spent on the bike.

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