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  1. #1
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    Stem length on the Mojo

    I've just got a new Mojo and am loving the ride. That being said, I have come from a Stumpjumper and while Mojo goes up hill far quicker and easier than the Stumpjumper, I feel less confident in the tight fast single track.

    I've been wondering whether it maybe because of the 120mm stem that comes on the Large Mojo and have been thinking about trying out a 100m stem and possibly a layback seatpost like a Thompsen. Has anyone had a play with stem length? Would be keen to hear your thoughts/ experience.

  2. #2
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    Hi,

    You might want to check out the latest issue of MBA in which they tested a bicycle with various stem lengths. To make things short, out of the 130,120,100 and 70mm stems they tested, they preferred the 100mm :

    "Out of the saddle attacks were fun, because the bike held its intended line better. This stem moved the riders' weight rearward, so lofting the front wheel was easier and the downhill was attacked instead of just ridden. The medium stem put the rider in better touch with the front tire, and this really showed up on the switchbacks."

  3. #3
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    Same boat...

    I love my mojo but the 120mm on the large felt too long for the technical downhill sections so I bought a 100mm. I haven't done extensive testing yet, but while cruising it around the block it feels much better and more stable. I have the seat back very far, so now my elbows can bend a bit more and I have more control. I'm riding on some trails tomorrow (provided it warms up to 30!), so I'll let you know how it works. BTW I found some great WTB stems on ebay for $25 in a 100mm. They are very light and look great....it's worth the price just to have some options.....

    ecibis

  4. #4
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    Anybody look at a Syntace adjustable stem? The one I looked at could go from 85-135 mm. VRO they call it.
    A bicycle will take you to fantastic places....if you let it.


    Ibis fan since '08 now rolling on the big wheeled Ripley.

  5. #5
    www.derbyrims.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4212darren
    Anybody look at a Syntace adjustable stem? The one I looked at could go from 85-135 mm. VRO they call it.
    Syntace VRO $23 on ebay right now:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/NEW-SYNTACE-MOUN...QQcmdZViewItem

    That would be handy to dial in your best ride postion then get a lighter or better looking fixed length stem once comfort is found.

  6. #6
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    Stem made a huge difference

    I took out the mojo yesterday with my new 100mm stem to replace the 120mm stock stem and there was a huge difference. My elbows were able to bend a bit more so whipping the bike through twisty rocky singletrack became much easier....I think before I must have been near the limit of my arms reach when I made a tight turn. Descending felt much better. I was able to go down several technical rollers with complete control whereas before I aws a bit white knuckled on a couple of them.

    I was also surprised at how well I could climb. There are lots of rock garden climbs that I have had trouble with in the past that I was finally able to clean. One negative observation for climbing is that the front end lofts very easy. After I did a few tech climbs I got used to the feel and it wasn't an issue. I don't see any reason why I would be going back to the 120mm.

    Ecibis

  7. #7
    flow where ever you go
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    Point and shoot, point and shoot, change your point... shoot.

    I was thinking that besides stem length, the Mojo geometry and added travel may create such a different feel, that it causes you to feel less confident. But really, once used to it, you may feel more confidant than ever. I do.

    I just read a MBA description of riding the Intense 5.5 that I think explains some of the difference between a x-country ride and a 5.5 (or Mojo) type ride on singletrack. Though we all know the Mojo is better than the 5.5, the following quote (I think) describes a similar singletrack experience to the Mojo:

    "The Intense holds a line with great precision, so cross-country racer types who are used to indiscriminately wagging the handlebar while they ride will be chasing the 5.5 around the trail at first. Point it where you want to go and it will take you there within a half inch. Learn this, and you can relax through almost any technical situation that one would find on a forest singletrack."

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