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  1. #1
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    Running a 140mm fork on a Mojo HD 160mm

    Hi,

    sorry for barrage of questions, but I am trying to figure out what I can have and some of the compromises I'll need to make. From what I have read, the Moho HD in the 140mm configuration loses some of the plushness that comes with having an extra 20mm of travel. I like the idea of a plush rear suspension as our trails are pretty gnarly, but I don't think I need the extra travel up front. My idea would be to run the Mojo HD with a 140mm fork and the CC Angleset, so that I keep the slack front end, but keep the 160mm of travel at the back. Is that a good idea or not? The bike might have a bit of an unbalanced feel, but I am trying to see where I could lose a little bit of weight on the bike. Or would I be better off with sticking to 140mm front and back and use the Angleset to get the slacker head angle?

    Thanks a lot in advance.
    A climb is really just a flat piece of road that points up. A headwind is a climb that you can't see. So it's all flat road, really.

  2. #2
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    Get a 36 160 Fork and lower it to 140..........if it doesn't feel right raise it back to 160.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuck_tacoma View Post
    Get a 36 160 Fork and lower it to 140..........if it doesn't feel right raise it back to 160.
    I am not a big guy, about 155lbs without gear, so I am trying to keep the weight in around 27lbs-28lbs and yet still have the benefits of the slacker head angle. Running the Mojo in 140mm up front would allow me to use a Fox 32, rather than the 36 and save some weight in the process. By keep the rear at 160mm, I would keep the plushness aspect of the Mojo HD.

    Thoughts?
    A climb is really just a flat piece of road that points up. A headwind is a climb that you can't see. So it's all flat road, really.

  4. #4
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    Reputation: clewttu's Avatar
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    why wouldnt you want a balanced bike with a 160 f/r?

  5. #5
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    Interesting thought on changing the bike. I ran my HD140 w/a 160 36 in the front and 140 in the back, still feels balanced (because the limbo chips reduce the needed eye-to-eye on the shock). Now I'm lowering my 36 to 150 for the benefits of a slightly lower axle to crown on geo, while retaining the awesomeness of 20mm axle and 36mm stanchions.

    In theory lowering your fork shouldn't make the bike feel that unbalanced from a geo perspective, albeit the axle to crown on a 140mm 32 is more than 10mm less than 36 at 150, and 10mm less than the 32 at 150. However, in terms of what you are getting out of your suspension it very well might feel unbalanced. Imagine the back of your bike being plush and stiff, with the front much less plush and much less stiff. IMHO you want as much out of the front of your bike as possible especially if you're riding gnarly trail. Fork flex (highly dependent on axle width and stanchion width) can be very noticeable during cornering and from deflection when riding "gnarly" trails. Don't compromise the front end of a great bike for .75lb. try to save some weight where you will notice every gram - maybe not every gram , wheels...
    Evil Undead & a box of trail bike parts waiting for a new frame

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by clewttu View Post
    why wouldnt you want a balanced bike with a 160 f/r?
    Right now, my thinking is that I am not sure the weight penalty of having a 160mm fork up front is worth the benefits I am going to get out of it. I would think, and please correct me if I am wrong, that the major benefit of 160mm is on jumps and gaps, which I don't really do. Right now, I ride a 140mm fork and I have never really been in a situation where I wished I had more travel upfront.

    Does that answer your question?
    A climb is really just a flat piece of road that points up. A headwind is a climb that you can't see. So it's all flat road, really.

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