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  1. #1
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    is the Ripley too much of a trail bike to be a XC weapon of choice?

    XC race bike. I raced a carbon HT (Rocky Vertex) in a national series last season, I am looking for a 100ml dually. To race on for longer racers this season.
    120ml is probably too much travel for racing. could the Ripley be fitted with a 100ml fork?
    Have been looking at the turner and pivot 100 ml bikes, could the Ripley be an option to these two offerings? are there any after market fixes to bring down rear end travel in a similar way to the mojo HD.
    Raced the Mojo (great bike )with a 100ml fork for a season but in the end the rear had too much travel for racing . Will the Ripley have the same issues as the Mojo as a XC rig.

  2. #2
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    If Evan Plews can win on it, then you can win on it. It's the motor more than the chassis, ya know? You can always put the fork/shock into climb mode and that's basically a lockout.

  3. #3
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    What specifically is the problem with the extra travel in the rear? Frame weight and pedaling efficiency are spectacular. It has a relatively high amount of anti-squat engineered in given its travel. In that sense, I'd think of the Ripley as a 100mm bike in which Ibis added an extra 20mm of travel because it was essentially free.

    If I was building a race machine today, and the courses were rugged enough to make suspension preferable to the hardtail, I'd go with a Ripley, put a 120mm SID on the front, and build it as light as I could afford.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by lazarus2405 View Post
    If I was building a race machine today, and the courses were rugged enough to make suspension preferable to the hardtail, I'd go with a Ripley, put a 120mm SID on the front, and build it as light as I could afford.
    Word. I have a SC Highball C (~21lb) and a Ripley(~25lb), and would race the Ripley over the Highball for most courses. The only exception for that would be short course races, or super smooth XCO style courses - everywhere else, the Ripley kills it.

  5. #5
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    You say that you are talking about longer races right? For 50 milers and up, I think a Ripley, with 120 mm fork, and a light build with light wheels is going to be perfect. For the typical less than 2 hour XC type races a carbon hardtail is almost always the way to go. For the very fit young racer, the 29er carbon hardtail can even work for endurance racing on smoother courses. But, if I were still doing a regular schedule of endurance racing, i would choose a lightly built Ripley without question, and love it for both racing and long trail rides.

  6. #6
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    I think its more XC than you realize, not in a bad way. I woudn't worry about running 120mm front and rear. The bike is flat out fast and super efficient with a built in "oh sh*t" cushion if you need it.

  7. #7
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    thanks for the feed back . probally need to get on one somewhere. but the mojo in the end didn't really work as a race bike for me for two reasons,( i did race it for one season and still own it for trail riding) 1. too short in the top tube 2. too much travel (bob ) in the rear. I won't discount the rip till i ride one but would prefer less travel.

  8. #8
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    I think for short races - 2 hours or below, then you are really looking at a hard tail. Anything endurance I think the Ripley should be considered. Climbing performance is amazing by all reports and having the 20mm extra travel will be beneficial on those sketchy descents.

  9. #9
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    If you want an almost single purpose "every second counts" race bike, then you will likely be better off on a light short travel 100mm 29er IMO. But if you also want it to double as a trail bike as well (or your target race courses are on the rougher side), go Ripley.

    From what I've seen, most race courses (including longer ones) are smooth enough for 100mm, so in general the shorter travel will be a bit more efficient. But this will of course vary depending on which bikes you are comparing, so definitely test ride (on familiar terrain with a timer) if you can. And in a tie, go with the more versatile.

  10. #10
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    Racing the Ripley

    Quote Originally Posted by mmatrix View Post
    XC race bike. I raced a carbon HT (Rocky Vertex) in a national series last season, I am looking for a 100ml dually. To race on for longer racers this season.
    120ml is probably too much travel for racing. could the Ripley be fitted with a 100ml fork?
    Have been looking at the turner and pivot 100 ml bikes, could the Ripley be an option to these two offerings? are there any after market fixes to bring down rear end travel in a similar way to the mojo HD.
    Raced the Mojo (great bike )with a 100ml fork for a season but in the end the rear had too much travel for racing . Will the Ripley have the same issues as the Mojo as a XC rig.
    I am sure going to try racing it. 24.5 pounds, efficient travel. I think it can be done. I'll post how that goes. Here are my thoughts so far:
    dirtsurf

  11. #11
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    I've got the Ripley with the 120 fox in front, and I did the 12 hours of Temecula last weekend. I had no problems on this bike. Super efficient climber, and I was passing the Hard tails on the descents. I had the opportunity to use a stupid light cannondale HT on one of my laps just to compare, but I was just having too much fun on the Ripley. Much less beat up than my HT buddies

  12. #12
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    The Ripley's BB height is already as low as most 100mm travel race bikes, with a shorter fork even lower.

    The Ripley is much firmer pedaling than the Mojo SL as is.

    And the shock could be custom shimmed about 1/4 inch to make 100mm travel, or with mail order volume spacers from direct from Fox or RockShox to reduce air volume with no solid travel reduction, either way would ramp up to be more firm for standing pedaling.

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