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  1. #1
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    Ripley + ? = the perfect two (mountain) bike stable.

    Ripley owners: if you could own only one additional mountain bike, what would it be? They Ripley covers so much ground for me that it's hard to find too many areas where it is lacking short of really aggro all-mountain/DH stuff. Maybe bikepacking is a gap as well since the front triangle isn't well designed for a framebag.

    Personally, I'm thinking that adding either a Lenz Lunchbox or maybe one of the new 6" 650B bikes (Bronson, BikeCo HDR, Pivot Mach 6) might be the perfect complement to the Ripley.

    Obviously this depends on your local terrain and riding preferences, but I'm just curious: what gaps do you see in what the Ripley does well and how would you fill them with a second mountain bike?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by D_Man View Post
    Ripley owners: if you could own only one additional mountain bike, what would it be? They Ripley covers so much ground for me that it's hard to find too many areas where it is lacking short of really aggro all-mountain/DH stuff. Maybe bikepacking is a gap as well since the front triangle isn't well designed for a framebag.

    Personally, I'm thinking that adding either a Lenz Lunchbox or maybe one of the new 6" 650B bikes (Bronson, BikeCo HDR, Pivot Mach 6) might be the perfect complement to the Ripley.

    Obviously this depends on your local terrain and riding preferences, but I'm just curious: what gaps do you see in what the Ripley does well and how would you fill them with a second mountain bike?
    That is a good question, I've been pondering this for some time myself. The Ripley is such an amazing do it all bike. I am thinking a longer travel 650 such as the HDR or the Bronson. Then again, a 140 on the ripley may just solve the problem.....

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by joshthedoc1 View Post
    That is a good question, I've been pondering this for some time myself. The Ripley is such an amazing do it all bike. I am thinking a longer travel 650 such as the HDR or the Bronson. Then again, a 140 on the ripley may just solve the problem.....
    I switched my Rip to a 140, and I don't feel like I lost anything except a bit of weight. Strava times going up are just as fast (or slow), and it is so much more fun going down. Makes a very versatile bike even more versatile.

  4. #4
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    Ripley + ? = the perfect two (mountain) bike stable.

    A 140 is cheaper than a whole new bike. Is fox making a 120-140mm fork with the 51 offset?

  5. #5
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    Knolly chilcotin

    I had an hd and it climbed really well but I always thought it was just ok on the downs for a 160mm travel bike. Then I got the ripley and the hd just pretty much underwhelmed me. So I sold it and got a chili...Significantly better descender than the hd! Like completely different league. Plus it pedals well for a bike that descends so well. It really feels like a mini dh bike when you point it down. Perfect for a bike suited for burly rides that require pedaling and also serves as an amazing park bike.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by joshthedoc1 View Post
    A 140 is cheaper than a whole new bike. Is fox making a 120-140mm fork with the 51 offset?
    Don't think so--I think you can get 120-150. But I'd never buy and adjustable travel fork again. Suppleness takes a big hit.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by D_Man View Post
    Don't think so--I think you can get 120-150. But I'd never buy and adjustable travel fork again. Suppleness takes a big hit.
    Ibis' optional 34 Talas is a 140-120 custom made for Ibis (Instead of 140-110)

    Ripley 29 | Bikes | Ibis Cycles US
    Under the options after you pick a build kit

  8. #8
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    Cool--didn't know they had come out with that. But would still never do a TALAS again.

  9. #9
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    A fat bike so that I can bike all year long. Don't need another mountain bike. Yet.

  10. #10
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    Cool question! For me, the Ripley covers almost all kinds of riding I do. Just change tires and it becomes a more trail-oriented bike for the long, technical rides (Specialized Purgatory 2.3), or an ultra fast machine for marathon races (Schwalbe ThunderBurt 2.10 (rear)/RocketRon 2.25 (front)).
    If I were to buy a more Enduro-style bike (long-travel 650b) I would also have to ride so much harder and take so more risks on more dangerous courses, and honestly, I am not sure I am up for that. I do a lot of back country skiing and have seen how better equipment makes you seek out higher jumps and more risky terrain, where any little mistake will cost in terms of pain and possible injuries (two broken ribs this winter...). Not sure I want to risk my XC/marathon season for that little extra adrenaline kick. Anyways, the kids are so much faster on the downhill sections, my strength is on the climbs. Too old for that ****!
    I own an OK road bike (Salsa Campeon), but would like to change that to a CX-bike like the Häkkalügi. It would cover my commuter needs, road training, dirt road cycling, and my ambitions for road races do not demand anything that the Häkk would not let me do.
    The bike I miss is a fatbike! Winters are long and with a lot of snow, so being able to do some riding in the XC-skiing trails would be fun! This winter has had a long period where there was such a hard crust on the snow in the mountains, that fatbikes could ride anywhere. A fatbike would not let me do road races, but would allow me to commute to work throughout the winter.
    My choice for a second bike would be a fatbike! If I can have three: Ripley, fatbike, Häkkalügi Disc!

  11. #11
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    In addition to my Ripley I also own:

    1) Ventana El Bastardo 5" travel 650B bike.

    2) Ventana El Padrino 29er HT.

    Not that I need them but always fun to switch it up to make the local trails more exciting.
    Last edited by procos; 03-11-2014 at 04:28 PM.

  12. #12
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    Leaning toward Fatbike here too...

    Good question!

    My current stable is:

    HDR650b - Love this thing! It's more fun then my old HD, which is stunning to me.
    Hakkalugi - I use this for CX racing, gravel rides, and road with the right wheels.
    On-One 29'er HT, which I'll replace as soon as Ibis figures out what's coming after the Tranny (cuz they have to!)

    ...I'm actively trying NOT to own more bikes then I can reasonably keep in riding circulation. I don't need 10 bikes in my garage ( repeat that 10x )

    But I confess I'm Fatbike-curious, only because we get a decent amount of snow in the PNW and I know too many folks having crap tons of fun with theirs.
    - -benja- -

  13. #13
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    Ripley + ? = the perfect two (mountain) bike stable.

    Ripley + SS Ridged 29er!



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Vassago VerHauen
    Ibis Ripley.

  14. #14
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    I added a Reeb Reebdonkadonk and have been enjoying it. The Ripley is plenty of bike for my riding style and allows me long hours in the mountains. I would not be able to justify a bike with more travel as I don't have the balls for what they are capable of. The Reeb is setup fat at the moment, but with a wheelset change, can also be a 29" or 29+. Also can switch between gears and single speed on the Reeb. Looking forward to experimenting further with the Reeb as it should be very versatile.

  15. #15
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    Ripley + ? = the perfect two (mountain) bike stable.

    Ti mojo ltd 29er with ripley geo tweaked for 100mm travel fork and 142 through axle dropouts.

  16. #16
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    I have been working on the same goal for about a year and a half now. I bought a Ripley and was planning on running at 140mm Pike to make it a bit more trail friendly. I ended with a nice little bonus to play with and went the other direction.

    My Ripley is built light for all day epics and marathon racing. 120mm fork, XTR 2x10 (not a SRAM guy), and Rocket Rons. The complement to the Ripley should arrive any day, a burly build for a Mach 6, 160mm BOS Deville, BOS Kirk, XTR 1x10 with wolf tooth chainring, Magic Mary front, Hans Dampf rear.

    That's the direction I headed and expect to be really very pleased.

  17. #17
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    I had a Santa Cruz Highball as the Ripley's stablemate for a while, which was great - but I found I'd take the Ripley out way more often than the hardtail, cos it climbed just as fast and was way nicer to descend on. I sold the Highball and got a Hakkalugi Disc. Between the Hak and the Ripley, I've got most of my bases covered.

  18. #18
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    I currently have a Ripley with Pike 140 (very happy with this!). I also have the Mojo HDR 650b, Hakaluggi disc and a Santa Cruz Highball (HT 29er)..

    I bought the HDR before I had my Ripley. I pulled an ENVE wheel set off my Tallboy and put it on my new Ripley and ditched the Tallboy. Now I'm not so sure I'll be riding my Mojo as much since the Ripley handles most of the downhill stuff that I do very well!

    I really didn't answer your question. It totally depends on where and what type of riding you like to do!

  19. #19
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    I think the OP was talking more capable. So HTs and Fatbikes are on the other side.

    Intense Carbine 29r and the Ripley would cover all bases short of full on DH. The Carbine 29r starts where the ripley ends off. I rode one on some super chuck and it was scary capable even compared to my Ripley w 140 Pike and big tires.

    The ripley is very agile quick and nimble the Carbine is more monster truck.

  20. #20
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    Hakkalugi Disc

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by motoguru2007 View Post
    I think the OP was talking more capable. So HTs and Fatbikes are on the other side...
    I respectfully disagree with your "Capable" statement in regard to hardtails. I have been riding a Canfield Yelli Screamy and Nimble 9 for the last couple years and both are easily as capable (and fun) as some FS 29ers out there.

    If I were to only have two bikes, with out a doubt, one would be a slack, short chainstay 29er hardtail.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  22. #22
    mdc
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    I currently have a Ripley and A Banshee Paradox ( short chainstay 29er. HT). I really like the Paradox, but would love a similar frame in carbon ( aluminum is pretty harsh). If ibis comes out with a Tranny 29er that is more "trail" vs XC- I would be all over it in a second....

  23. #23
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    Ripley + ? = the perfect two (mountain) bike stable.

    Another view of the question...

    I've got a Krampus and a MootoX YBB, and now I'm building the Ripley.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mowabb View Post
    Another view of the question...

    I've got a Krampus and a MootoX YBB, and now I'm building the Ripley.
    Interesting. I have a MootoX YBB that is up for sale. That and my Ripley were supposed to be my two-bike stable. But it just seems like everything the Moots can do, the Ripley can do better. My only regret in selling it will be the loss of the huge main triangle, which is perfect for bikepacking with a framebag.

  25. #25
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    If I was to get another bicycle (alongside my Ripley), I'd really like a Seven Cycles hardtail 29'er. I still have my old trusty 1992 Merlin, but with a 1" head tube and cantilever mounts, it just doesn't cut it nowadays

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