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  1. #1
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    pro-pedal rear shock not beneficial on mojo?

    hi all,
    i was talking this guy over the weekend who had a mojo with a coil shock. he was saying that pro-pedal/platform pedal shocks aren't beneficial for dw-link bikes, so he outfitted his with a coil. so my question is if this is true. if so, how many people are using coil shocks or more linear air shocks (i heard the marzocchi rocco air is a good one...although i can't find it).

    thanks!

  2. #2
    Mojo0115
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    I have a vanilla rc coil rear shock on my mojo. I still have my RP23 and will keep it for when I want a light-weight build, but the feel of coil is just so nice. I never used the platform settings on the RP23, you just don't need them on the mojo except perhaps for long smooth uphill grinds.

    I would put a roco tst on as well but the size for the mojo just isn't available anywhere I could find.

    (* where were you talking to the guy who switched to coil? )

  3. #3
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    i was talking to this guy at the bottom of tamacharo boy scout trail in marin (san fran). that would be funny if that was you.

    i was curious mainly because i noticed a lot of people with coil shocks lately, but i worry about the lack of lockout features (since i hate to climb, and will take as much help as possible) and if it's worth if for a 155lb guy not hucking off of huge jumps.

  4. #4
    www.derbyrims.com
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    I'm using an early used Vanilla RC I found on ebay for $100 (before propedal), because I really like the smoothest ride possible.

    (You might have talked to me in Fairfax on Saturday?)

    The RP23 is almost as good as an air shock gets, without custom tuning. And the Mojo makes the RP23 ride better than any other bike. The DHX Air option is the only better air shock, and can be tuned a little smoother over small bumps than the RP23. But the propedal firm switch on the fly of the RP23 can be handy for long standing climbing to eliminate the mild bob when standing or perhaps street riding or hard XC racing.

    My RC is going to PUSH Industries, the top custom tuners for Fox shocks, this week for their custom tuning magic. They can remove or change the platform damping in all the old or new Fox shocks and forks. And they refine the damping everywhere.

    I asked the owner of PUSH Industries about the Roco Air compared to stock RP23 (PUSH will very soon be custom tuning Roco shocks). He said the stock Roco Air has firmer platform damping than the RP23 at minimum stock setting.

    I've tried a few shocks and a couple forks on my Mojo and air suspension make the Mojo feel quicker and livelier, but coil is oh-so-smooth and makes it easier to ride slowly through rough terrain and adds only about 2 pounds weight (the weight of 2 pints of beer!)

    If you like to ride fast and time yourself everywhere, stay with air.

  5. #5
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    I'd heard the same about the dw-link, however I can notice the difference with pro-pedal on it's lowest setting to not on at all. Having said that, it's not a massive difference, but definately noticable.
    A recent magazine review that I read (Australian Mountain Bike) tested the Mojo SX (vs a few other bikes) and commented that they found the differences to be significant between pro-pedal on & off with the RP23.

    From my point of view, pro-pedal is simply a nice feature for long climbs.

  6. #6
    No Tail-Just a Nub
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    it makes a difference...

    Sure the mojo is an efficient design, but if you get on one with an RP23 and climb with the propedal off and with it on, there is just no way you can say it doesn't make a difference. I have been reading this claim a lot and simply don't get it

    Some people may not like the propedal on, but that in itself suggests it makes a difference. I have mine set on 2 and I find it makes a big difference in the ride. With it off, my mojo climbs ten times better than my old ride, but it definitely stiffens up, accelerates better and definitely has less bob out of the saddle with propedal on.

    That doesn't make the RP23 the right shock for you...again, try it out and see...

  7. #7
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    And why not a DT Carbon and save 100 g!

  8. #8
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    I agree 100% with sangmatt. I ride any long climb with the shock on the "2" setting. Sometimes I'll forget to flick the switch--this is a very efficient climber, afteral--but switching it on just makes it that much better.

    I asked about the DT shocks when I ordered my frame as the weight advantage had me interested. Ibis said they may offer this as a future option, but the stock DT shock is not set up correctly for the Mojo. Also, Fox Racing has a track record while DT is a relative unknown for now.
    My Wanted List:

    1. '87 Shogun Prairie Breaker Team Issue (small)

  9. #9
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    I will echo sangmatt and filegiant---if you are out of the saddle cranking, there is a major difference with PP on and off on the RP23. I haven't run anything firmer than PP1, but even that makes a big difference. If you are climbing while seated, there is not a big difference between PP on/off though---and if you are seated climbing in TECHNICAL conditions, I have found that keeping PP off works much better, since the more active suspension facilitates much better traction. I've never tried a coil, but sounds fun!
    Last edited by getbusyliving; 06-20-2007 at 04:09 PM.

  10. #10
    holding back the darkness
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    The settings on the RP23 are very noticeable. I don't think this is disputable. I think the DW-link mojo is probably the most efficient design available today. If one fitted the Mojo with a coil spring with absolutely no damping whatsoever, and then compared it to other bicycles of various design set up with the same coil, the pedalling efficiency properties would probably become very noticeable.
    This is not to say that the design is perfect. It still requires some degree of damping. Suspension must by some means reduce the amount of force entered into the system to a lesser amount that exits the system. If this did not happen we would be riding expensive pogo sticks that would buck us every time we landed. Damping does this, and converts the difference in energy into heat. Blah, blah, basic thermodynamics that I'm sure Derby can explain better than I. Point being that some degree of damping is required, even desireable if you want your user to be able to tune the bike to their specific liking. The RP23 does a great job of applying the proper amounts of damping in a very tunable package. It really is the key that unlocks this bike from an all-around bike that pretty well excels at everything to a bike that kicks ass at everything. You want a super-stiff on the way up and a couch on the way down? Set the dial for 3 and flip the lever open when you get to the top. Need traction? leave it open or dial it back to 2 or 1. The RP23 adds range to an already diverse bike, and makes more accessible to dream of the One Perfect Bike, the one that pedals like a hardtail singlespeed, climbs like a bottle rocket, descends like a full on 9inch DH bike and feels a cush as my old Columbia to ride around all day on. This mythical bike doesn't exist yet, but a properly set-up Mojo is getting us close.
    Now.. if you dig a fire-and-forget approach and have a handle on how to set things up, then the coil spring ride might be for you.. or you can play with the RP23 settings and find the one that works and leave it there forever.
    I took mine over to Push and I told Darren that I wanted the mythical bike that did everything just the way I wanted, to the point of contridiction. And he came through. Those folks at PUSH are pretty bright kids who make me look like a neanderthal pondering fire where it comes to tuning. Darren let me take a look at the graphs they generate from mapping a suspension. And I realized that had the cycling industry not nabbed these guys they would be hard at work in Area 51 or Los Alamos designing black aircraft and deadly versions of flubber. Not to mention that they ride, so that in addition to the cute numbers and graphs they actually have a visceral understanding of what all that data means. I bet that Darren actually plots these little charts in his head as he rides bikes and then maps them to confirm his thoughts.
    So, yeah... their good. They're worth the bucks. And their magic works even on a highly evolved machine like the mojo.
    **** censorship

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